Report of Operations

Outcome and Strategies

Performance reporting in this chapter is based on the Library’s outcome and strategies set out in the Portfolio Budget Statement 2012–13. The Library has one outcome:

Enhanced learning, knowledge creation, enjoyment and understanding of Australian life and society by providing access to a national collection of library material.

In 2012–13, the Library achieved this outcome through its focus on four strategic directions:

  • collect and preserve Australia’s documentary heritage
  • make the Library’s collections and services accessible to all Australians
  • deliver national leadership
  • achieve organisational excellence.

Strategic Direction One: Collect and Preserve Australia’s Documentary Heritage

The Library collects Australian printed publications under the legal deposit section of the Copyright Act, as well as selected materials in other formats, including oral histories, manuscripts, pictures and e-publications. The Library also harvests and archives a snapshot of the Australian (.au) internet domain.

In 2012–13, the Library undertook to:

  • document Australia’s cultural, intellectual and social life by collecting, storing and preserving Australian print and digital publishing, personal papers, photographs, paintings, maps and oral histories
  • inform Australians about their region and their place in the world through the Library’s Asian and other overseas collections.

Major Initiatives

Legal Deposit Consultations

In November and December 2012, the Library participated in consultations concerning the extension of legal deposit to electronic materials. Other participants were publishers and other stakeholders, including the Australian Copyright Council, the Australian Publishers Association, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the Australian Digital Alliance and the Australian Libraries Copyright Committee. The views of the Copyright Agency Limited and the Australian Society of Authors were also represented. These consultations addressed the core concerns raised during the public consultation held earlier in 2012. Significant progress was made on substantive issues.

Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement Project

The Library completed the tender process for the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project, selecting DocWorks as its digitisation workflow system, and Safety Deposit Box as its preservation and digital library core system. The development of associated standards, specifications, workflows and selection policy for the digitisation of books and journals has also been completed, and digitisation will commence, using DocWorks, in 2013–14.

Overseas Collecting

The Library completed the implementation of strategic changes to its overseas collecting program during the year. The number of print journal subscriptions was reduced from approximately 2,000 titles to 750 titles, with the majority of the cancelled titles being out of scope for the Library’s collection or not core journals in their subject areas. In January 2013, the Library began offering overseas ebooks in place of print books. It is estimated that one-third of United States monographs acquired are now in ebook form, providing much-improved access for users.

In 2013–14, the Library will begin transferring remaining print subscriptions to digital format where possible, completing the strategic move from print to digital collecting.

Australian Digital Collecting

The PANDORA Australian web archive collection continued to increase, with a 14 per cent addition of new archived instances of websites and documents. The result was an increase of 29 per cent in the amount of data managed in the archive.

In May 2010, the Secretaries’ ICT Governance Board for whole-of-government arrangements gave approval for the Library to collect online government publications, resulting in bulk harvests of Australian Government websites in 2011, 2012 and 2013. The combined content collected in these harvests amounted to around 27 million files, or 2.1 terabytes of data. The Library will make this collection available in the second half of 2013 through the new access portal called the Australian Government Web Archive.

Issues and Developments

While Australian ebook publishing continues to evolve, most titles are still being produced in both print and electronic formats. The Library collects print versions through legal deposit, and has been negotiating with creators and publishers for the voluntary deposit of electronic versions where these can be made available for public access.

Australian print publications received through legal deposit declined during 2012–13. The number of print books received fell by approximately 15 per cent and the number of journal issues by around 10 per cent. While there are other variables influencing the receipt of legal deposit materials, such as publishers’ awareness of their obligations, this decline has been noticeable for some years. It reinforces the need for a legislative framework that enables the Library to receive e-publications through deposit in the same way that it does for print materials.

A project to preserve and digitise the Enemark Collection of 500 nitrate negative panoramic images (acquired by the Library in 1965) was completed. The images depict cities, towns and rural views in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory during the period 1917 to 1946. Their unusual format and fragility had meant they were not accessible prior to the digitisation.

Important collection items that received preservation treatment during the year included:

  • drawings and watercolours by George French Angas
  • pictures, plans and documents from the Eric Milton Nicholls collection for the exhibition, The Dream of a Century: The Griffins in Australia’s Capital
  • a seventeenth-century atlas, Atlantis Majoris, which required treatment for verdigris corrosion before being exhibited in Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia.

As part of an ongoing program to upgrade collection storage equipment, 7,500 linear metres of older, motorised compact shelving were replaced. Refurbishment of the Strong Room with purpose-designed shelving and plan cabinets for outsized material has enabled a 75 per cent increase in storage capacity for the Library’s most valuable, rare and highly restricted collection material.

Behind-the-scenes volunteer activities were reviewed, with the aim of aligning them more consistently with the priorities of collecting areas. Volunteers contribute to a range of collection activities, including sorting, describing and researching collection material to improve access.

The Library acquired many interesting and significant materials during the year. A selection of notable acquisitions is listed in Appendix J.

Performance

Data on the Library’s performance against deliverables and key performance indicators relating to storing, maintaining and cataloguing its collection is provided in the following tables (Tables 3.1 to 3.3) and figures (Figures 3.1 and 3.2).

Table 3.1: Develop, Store and Maintain the National Collection: Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2012–13

 

Measure

Target

Achieved

Deliverables

Collection items stored and maintained (no.)

6,470,000

6,496,935

 

Items catalogued or indexed (no.)

62,000

62,264

Key performance indicators

National collection: processing (%)

85.0

94.0

 

National collection: storage (%)

95.0

94.0

Figure 3.1: Number of Collection Items Stored and Maintained

Figure 3.1: Vertical bar graph showing the Number of Collection Items Stored and Maintained.

The target was met.

Table 3.2: National Collection—Storage (%)

Achieved

Achieved

Target

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

95.8

95.3

95.0

94.0

95.0

95.0

95.0

95.0

The average annual result is just below target. With the exception of the September quarter, conditions throughout the remainder of the year met or exceeded the 95 per cent target.

Figure 3.2: Number of Collection Items Catalogued or Indexed

Figure 3.2: Vertical Bar graph showing the Number of Collection Items Catalogued or Indexed

The target was met.

Table 3.3: National Collection—Processing (%)

Achieved

Achieved

Target

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

84.0

91.3

95.0

94.0

85.0

95.0

95.0

95.0

The target was exceeded. The target for this year had been reduced (by 10 per cent) to 85 per cent, in anticipation of the impact on staff training required to introduce the new Resource Description and Access (RDA) cataloguing rules. However, the move to the new cataloguing standard was achieved without the expected temporary decline in the time taken for processing.

Strategic Direction Two: Make the Library’s Collections and Services Accessible to All Australians

The Library provides access to its collection for all Australians through services to users in the main building and nationally through online information services. Its reference and collection delivery services are provided both to onsite users and to those outside Canberra via online services and the digitisation of selected collection resources. The Library also delivers a diverse annual program of exhibitions and events.

In 2012–13, the Library undertook to:

  • harness new and emerging opportunities in the digital environment—including the National Broadband Network—to engage with diverse Australian audiences, including those in regional and remote communities
  • support research and lifelong learning for all Australians by maximising online access to the Library’s collections and services.

Major Initiatives

Digitisation partnerships were a prime focus.

During 2012–13, 1.1 million pages of newspapers published in New South Wales and 330,000 pages from the New South Wales Government Gazette were digitised under a partnership with the State Library of New South Wales. This partnership will see 6 million pages of newspapers and the complete Government Gazette of almost 1 million pages digitised and accessible on Trove by June 2016.

In addition, 41 regional libraries, councils and other organisations sponsored the digitisation of 49 newspaper titles, amounting to 310,000 pages. Individuals and organisations also generously contributed to the project to digitise issues of The Canberra Times between 1955 and 1995.

Issues and Developments

Collection Management

A major project commenced to review policies and improve workflows associated with the development and management of the Library’s archival collections. This project will streamline collection processing activities including acquisitions, enhance collection control, and enable integration of similar work functions. It will also provide faster access to collection material for users, and better management of digital records.

Online Access to Special Collections

The Library continued its focus on increasing the discoverability and online access to special collections.

Innovative approaches have led to the cataloguing of over 1,150 map series, enabling users to identify individual sheets via digitised graphical indexes. All series covering the Pacific, South Asian and Middle East regions were completed, leading to increased use of these collections. Another project—to increase discoverability of pictures lacking an online catalogue record—produced subject-based records for approximately 365,000 photographs. A further 500 hours of oral history recordings were also delivered online, with the audio linked to transcripts and time-pointed summaries to support easier discovery and navigation.

In addition, a project to convert catalogue card entries for Chinese collection material was completed. This resulted in 7,000 new holdings being added to the online catalogue, greatly improving access to this important collection.

Information and Research Services

The Ask a Librarian and Copies Direct services are widely appreciated, particularly in regional Australia. Thirty-eight per cent of questions from Australian users to Ask a Librarian and 28 per cent of Australian Copies Direct requests came from people living in regional Australia. In the words of one user: ‘Superb service, courteous, accurate, fast … you will have saved me a trip to Canberra from Melbourne which is extra good. In addition, I am a disabled student with only one hand so your service is more than extra good, it is a life-saver’.

The system used to manage reference inquiries was upgraded to enable questions to be redirected efficiently. Inquiries received by Trove are now being transferred to the Ask a Librarian service, negating the need for clients to resubmit inquiries, and saving staff time through automatic transfer of both the inquiry and transaction history. Planning is under way to extend this functionality to enable the transfer of inquiries between all state and territory libraries.

The Library’s continued support of in-depth study of its collections is borne out by the output of researchers and authors. Dr Martin Thomas, for example, won the National Biography Award for his book, The Many Worlds of R.H. Mathews: In Search of an Australian Anthropologist, which was based on research undertaken during his Harold White Fellowship; author Kate Grenville was a regular user of the Petherick Reading Room; and Alan Fewster made extensive use of the Library for his book, The Bracegirdle Incident: How an Australian Communist Ignited Ceylon's Independence Struggle.

Online Engagement

A Social Media Coordinator was appointed to manage online engagement through Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube and blogs. The Library’s Flickr Commons account is updated with a monthly upload of photographs on selected themes such as the outback and Australians at war. The account generally receives over 800 visits per day, with a surge in visitation to approximately 75,000 daily visits following the upload of each new set of images. The Library has also commenced offering online participation in learning programs using the Google+ platform, which enables participants outside Canberra to hear the presenter and view the presenter’s screen.

An evaluation of the Library’s four instructional videos found they had received 30,000 unique views in the six months since release. These short online videos have an excellent retention rate; they explain how to get a library card, what is available online, how to order copies, and how to start researching family history. Two additional videos were developed on accessing newspapers and searching catalogues.

Publications and Exhibitions

The Library published 18 new books promoting the collection. Sold through more than 1,550 outlets in Australia and New Zealand and also online, sales of two titles—Flying the Southern Cross: Aviators Charles Ulm and Charles Kingsford Smith, and Topsy-turvy World: How Australian Animals Puzzled Early Explorers—required reprinting within six months of release. Topsy-turvy World has been shortlisted for the 2013 Children’s Book Council of Australia’s Eve Pownall Award for Information Book. Collaborative arrangements with the Indigenous Literacy Foundation’s Book Buzz program and the Libraries ACT Bookstart for Babies program resulted in bulk purchases of the Library’s children’s books.

Since the opening of the Treasures Gallery in October 2011, over 170,000 patrons have enjoyed viewing some of the Library’s greatest treasures. During the year, over 200 new items were displayed as the gallery content was refreshed on four separate occasions. Public response remains positive, and the gallery has successfully established itself as a new destination for tourists.

Performance

Performance data relating to access to the collection and service to users is provided as follows:

  • Table 3.4 shows deliverables and key performance indicators relating to access to the national collection and other documentary resources during 2012–13
  • Figure 3.3 compares delivery of physical collection items to users against targets over the past four years
  • Table 3.5 compares performance against the Service Charter over the same four-year period.

Table 3.4: Provide Access to the National Collection and Other Documentary Resources—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2012–13

 

Measure

Target

Achieved

Deliverable

Physical collection items delivered to users (no.)

238,000

182,192

Key performance indicator

Collection access: Service Charter (%)

100.0

99.0

Figure 3.3: Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users

Figure 3.3: Vertical Bar Graph Showing The Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users

The target was not met. There is a clear trend of reduced usage of the Library’s printed collections, with users preferring digital resources, including Australian newspapers on Trove.

Table 3.5: Collection Access—Service Charter (%)

Achieved

Achieved

Target

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

The Service Charter standards for reference inquiries responded to and for collection deliveries were both met. The website availability target was not met due to an extended internet outage in September 2012.

Strategic Direction Three: Deliver National Leadership

The Library delivers national leadership by providing a range of IT services to Australian libraries and collecting institutions, and by leading and participating in activities that make Australia’s cultural collections and information resources more readily available to the Australian public and international communities.

In 2012–13, the Library undertook to:

  • provide national infrastructure to underpin efficient and effective library services across the country, and to support Australian libraries in the twenty-first-century digital world
  • share knowledge and innovation experiences with the Australian and international sectors and collaborate to respond to new challenges and opportunities.

Major Initiatives

Resource Description and Access (RDA)

RDA, the new standard for bibliographic description of library materials (and the first major change in cataloguing rules in 40 years) was successfully implemented. The Library supported the Australian library community in the implementation by providing train-the-trainer courses for educators, professional trainers, staff from cataloguing agencies, and system vendors. All training and implementation documentation was made freely available online, and the Library is facilitating practical implementation through a dedicated email discussion group. Libraries Australia services were updated to support the new standard. Within the Library, a comprehensive and tailored training program was conducted for staff, and changes to related systems, workflows and policies were all completed.

Libraries Australia

Australian libraries use the Libraries Australia Search service on a daily basis to support their cataloguing and collection management workflows. Use of the service has increased steadily over the last ten years, with a 13 per cent increase in the last year. The Library commenced a project to replace the underlying software to deliver improved performance, the capacity to support large-scale data quality improvement projects, and a more usable and efficient interface. A prototype search interface was released to Libraries Australia’s 1,200 members for comment in May; the new service is due for delivery by March 2014. Libraries Australia continues to be the primary pathway through which Australian library collections are added to Trove.

Trove

Trove’s content base grew significantly during the year, largely as a result of increased participation in the national newspaper digitisation program. Trove Newspapers was originally developed to support delivery of up to 4 million pages of content. However, the success of the Library’s newspapers contribution model has seen Trove Newspapers climb to more than 10 million pages of content this year. The combination of major increases in Trove content and a nearly 50 per cent increase in use over the last year placed strains on Trove’s supporting infrastructure and software, resulting in a significant number of service outages.

In response, the Library replaced and upgraded Trove hardware during the year, embarked on a major project to redevelop the Trove Newspapers search and delivery services (due for completion in August 2013), and completed a range of smaller scale tasks to improve reliability and performance. The redeveloped Trove Newspapers interface will be mobile friendly, reflecting the increasing proportion of Australians accessing the service on smart phones and other mobile devices. In addition, a number of features previously available in the decommissioned Picture Australia and Music Australia services were implemented in Trove.

In addition to collaborating with libraries to deliver more digitised newspaper content, the Library has increased its efforts to collaborate with other collecting institutions and organisations. Six museum collections—large and small, national and local—were added to Trove during the year, and work is under way to incorporate collections from Australian archives. In addition, significant content has been added from the ABC (podcasts and transcripts for most Radio National shows) and from the CSIRO (articles from more than 30 scientific journals dating back to 1904).

National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA)

The Library continues to work collaboratively with NSLA on a range of projects aimed at transforming and aligning services offered by the national, state and territory libraries so that the needs of Australians for access to library services in the digital age can be better met.

The Library is leading the NSLA Digital Preservation Group. This group’s work will drive digital capability development over the next decade or more. During the year, the group developed a joint statement on digital preservation, defined a matrix outlining the most important components of digital preservation systems, and developed a model for a technical registry and format library for NSLA libraries.

The Library also co-led projects on managing and providing access to very large collections of pictures and maps.

International Relations

The Library continued to collaborate with the international library community. The Director General attended the annual congress of the International Federation of Library Associations held in Helsinki, Finland, in August 2012, and the annual Conference of Directors of National Libraries in Asia and Oceania held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in March 2013. These gatherings provided opportunities to participate in meetings and discussion groups canvassing issues of mutual interest to national libraries, including the collecting and management of digital collections. Library staff also presented at international conferences and seminars, and liaised with colleagues around the globe.

Australia’s special relationship with libraries in the Asia–Pacific region was reinforced through a number of initiatives. These included signing a memorandum of understanding with the National Library of China, and providing significant support to the National Library of Malaysia as it prepared to implement RDA in that country.

Issues and Developments

Although the most obvious indicators of Trove use are via its dedicated interface, the last year has seen a subtle shift towards Trove as a platform for development by others. Almost all content is freely available to developers via the Trove application programming interface. In the last year, the Library has provided full copies of newspaper content to a range of national and international researchers, including the Smart Services Cooperative Research Centre based in Sydney, and Harvard’s Cultural Observatory. These organisations aim to improve the results of Optical Character Recognition and to derive semantic meaning from digitised text. The Library is facilitating such requests in the belief that these centres of excellence will eventually develop software solutions that could be redeployed into Trove and the Library’s digital library infrastructure.

At a smaller scale, a number of local developers have used Trove to develop experimental interfaces to Trove content, especially its pictorial content. In June, NSLA offered two prizes in the 2013 national GovHack competition, hosted by the Department of Finance and Deregulation. Developers from across the country used the Trove dataset to develop prototype services, ranging from a mobile device application juxtaposing modern and historical photographs of Perth, through to mixing Trove content with other data sources such as shipping indexes. The Library is assessing these developments, and considering whether any can be integrated into Trove within the existing resource base.

These developments highlight the ways in which digital data and content can be released for use in multiple national and international services, reaching wider audiences and increasing return on investment. The Library’s current and potential role as an aggregator of cultural content from the library, archives, museums, galleries and research sectors means it will be pivotal in making Australia’s cultural heritage more available to the world.

In contrast to the Library’s expanding role as a disseminator of freely available digital content, the Library closed its Electronic Resources Australia (ERA) service during the year. Established in 2007, ERA aimed to improve Australians’ access to licensed electronic resources by advocating for national or sectoral licences, and establishing a financially self-sufficient consortium to deliver common licensing terms and conditions, and competitive pricing on selected e-resource products. ERA delivered benefits to more than 1,000 libraries (principally school libraries) over its life. However, despite advocacy and considerable efforts by many, the Library reluctantly concluded that national or sectoral licences are not achievable in the foreseeable future, and that there is no sustainable business model for a service of this nature.

Performance

The following tables and figures show performance data relating to the Library’s goals for collaborative projects and services.

Deliverables and key performance indicators in relation to providing and supporting collaborative projects and services in 2012–13 are shown in Table 3.6.

Table 3.6: Provide and Support Collaborative Projects and Services—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2012–13

Measure

Target

Achieved

Deliverables

Agencies subscribing to key collaborative services (no.)

2,420

1,399

Records and items contributed by subscribing agencies (no. in millions)

15.060

37.570

Key performance indicators

Collaborative services standards and timeframes (%)

97.0

98.0

Figure 3.4 depicts the changes over the last four years in the number of agencies subscribing to key collaborative services.

Figure 3.4: Number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative Services

Figure 3.4: Vertical bar graph showing the number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative Services

The target was not achieved due to the cessation of the ERA service. This resulted in 1,058 agencies (mainly school libraries) discontinuing their participation.

A comparison over the past four years in the number of records contributed by subscribing agencies is provided in Figure 3.5.

Figure 3.5: Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies

Figure 3.5: Vertical Bar graph showing the Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies

This target was exceeded. There was an increase in the number of newspaper articles and museum collection records contributed to Trove, and large batch loads of records were added to the Australian National Bibliographic Database.

Performance against the standards and timeframes for collaborative services is depicted in Table 3.7.

Table 3.7: Collaborative Services Standards and Timeframes (%)

Achieved

Achieved

Target

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

97.8

96.6

98.0

98.0

97.0

97.0

97.0

97.0

The target was met.

Strategic Direction Four: Achieve Organisational Excellence

The Library aspires to integrate social and environmental goals into its governance and business operations; develop the full potential of its staff to achieve the Library’s vision; diversify its funding sources to support the need to deliver collections and services to all Australians; and maximise returns on government and private sector investment by managing financial resources effectively.

In 2012–13, the Library undertook to provide its staff with:

  • a work environment that promotes career development, work–life balance, and work health and safety
  • the opportunity to participate in, and contribute to, sound governance arrangements and effective financial management.

Major Initiatives

Strategic Workforce Plan

The Library reinvigorated its mentoring program, developed a set of core leadership capabilities and a related leadership model, and implemented a diversity work-experience program and a reflective senior leadership forum to assist with career sustainability. To prepare for the Library’s changing digital environment, a process to identify potential workforce gaps has also begun. This will be followed by a review of initiatives across similar institutions.

The Library is forming working groups to explore issues and initiatives relevant to each of the plan’s three priority areas: building on existing staff capabilities, developing responsiveness to digital change, and cultivating operational and career sustainability.

Work Health and Safety Management

Work health and safety continues to be a high priority for Council and the Corporate Management Group. Over the course of the year, the Library consolidated its work health and safety systems and processes. The documentation for the Work Health and Safety Management System was endorsed by the Corporate Management Group and is now available to staff via the intranet.

Environmental Management

The Library continued to make significant gains in environmental management, as outlined in the Corporate Overview. More than 75 per cent of staff were trained in best-practice approaches to managing waste, resulting in accreditation with the ACTSmart Office Recycling program.

The Library completed a trial at the Hume Repository, which involved turning off the air-conditioning for a period of 12 months to see how well the building passively maintained conditions. Temperature and relative humidity levels remained suitable for collection storage, and the trial was extended to other collection storage areas.

In addition, a review of collection storage practices was completed, to better align preservation requirements, stacks practices, and energy use and requirements.

Personal Giving, Philanthropic and Business Partnerships

In 2012–13, 24.4 per cent of Library revenue came from non-appropriation sources, including 0.9 per cent from personal giving and philanthropic partnerships.

Assisted by the Chair of Council and the Library’s Foundation Board, the Library raised $559,000 in cash donations and $20,000 of in-kind sponsorship. A major priority was to raise funds and secure in-kind support for the international exhibition, Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia, which will open in November 2013. By June, over $1.2 million in cash had been pledged, with $298,500 received. The Library also sought to develop stronger relationships with its donor communities and, through the annual fundraising appeal and two fundraising dinners, gained support for the preservation and digitisation of an important collection of panoramic photographs, and for an early atlas. Building on the Library’s strong supporter base, work on a formal bequest program was completed in June.

The Library also entered into fee-for-service partnerships with various state libraries to digitise collections, mostly newspapers. The value of the work undertaken in 2012–13 was $3.090 million.

Governance Arrangements

The Library has continued its sound governance practices. These include strategic plans and policies to manage the collection, workforce, buildings and other plant and equipment. At the time of writing, no compliance issues had been identified in respect of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act and no issues of significance were identified during the course of the internal or external audit programs. Regular reporting was provided to Council and Government on major projects, and additional reports and processes were set in train to manage identified budget risks.

Individual performance management cycles were aligned to the financial year, to achieve better integration of performance and management with Government performance targets.

A new regime for valuing the collection asset was also established, to provide greater assurance to Council and Government of its overall value.

Cross-agency Key Performance Indicators

In May 2012, the Hon. Simon Crean, then Minister for the Arts, announced that a new planning and performance reporting framework would be implemented to provide more consistent reporting across national cultural agencies. The first tranche of this new framework commenced in this reporting year.

Government Priority: Access and Relevance

Table 3.8 shows the total number of physical visits to the Library and its collection. Total visitation to the Library building covers both paid and unpaid visits, as well as visits by students as part of an organised education group. Also included in the total visitation data are offsite visitors who see items from the Library’s collection on display at other venues, usually through loans for exhibitions. As the Library has no control over how other institutions measure their visitation, it is difficult to predict a target with any accuracy.

Table 3.8: Number of Visits to the Organisation

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Visits

1,081,081

863,000

882,000

900,000

917,000

The target for the total number of visits was exceeded. There were several factors contributing to this result: a number of successful events and Friends programs, the popularity of the ACT Government’s Enlighten festival in March, and the higher than anticipated number of people who visited other venues interstate to view the Library’s collection items. Less than 1 per cent of all visits were for paid events.

Online visits to the Library’s website are measured separately, and are shown in Table 3.9.

Table 3.9: Online Visits

  Achieved Target Target Target Target
 

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

Visits (millions)

45.47

35.00

36.00

37.00

39.00

Pageviews (millions) 357 342 352 369 390

The targets were exceeded.

Government Priority: Vibrancy

Table 3.10: Number of Initiatives that Strengthen Ties with Other Countries

  Achieved Target Target Target Target
 

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

Formal

30

30

30

30

30

Informal 67 100 100 100 100

The Library hosted 30 formal initiatives that helped strengthen ties with other countries, involving visits from official representatives from over 13 countries; hosted government delegations from three countries; signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Library of China; exchanged information with senior colleagues on areas of potential collaboration with more than ten international libraries and other cultural institutions; and hosted visits by former Ministers for the Arts.

Other initiatives during the year included responding to international requests for advice and information on a range of Library services and activities, and hosting visits by staff from more than 12 international institutions. Library staff also presented papers or appeared on panels, either by invitation or as guest speakers, at 12 international conferences, seminars and meetings.

Government Priority: National Leadership and Organisational Excellence

Share of Funding by Source shows the funding received from Government, cash sponsorship, cash donations and other income as a percentage of total.

Table 3.11: Share of Funding by Source (as a percentage of total funds)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Operational from Government 68.4 71.3 71.8 72.0 72.0
Capital from Government 13.3 14.1 14.3 14.4 14.4
Cash sponsorship income 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Other cash fundraising income 0.8 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1
Other income 17.3 14.4 13.8 13.5 13.4

In summary, the majority of the Library’s funding is provided by Government. The variances to budget for funding from Government are due to increased funding received compared to budget for income from sources other than Government, and reflects the conservative nature of the budgets for non-Government funding. The main variances in the source of funding compared to budget were other income and the receipt of additional cash donations. ‘Other income’ refers to revenue from independent sources less resources received free, cash sponsorship and donations. The variance to the budget is due to additional sales of goods and services and the receipt of additional interest. 

In Table 3.12, expenditure on collection development, other capital items, other (non-collection development) labour costs, and other expenses is shown as a percentage of total expenditure.

Table 3.12: Expenditure Mix (as a percentage of total expenditure)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Collection development

31.2

30.5

31.5

31.6

31.6

Non-collection capital

9.3

13.6

10.8

11.0

11.1

Other (non-collection development) labour costs

26.6

23.5

24.3

24.2

24.0

Other expenses

32.9

32.3

33.3

33.2

33.3

A large proportion of Library funding is related directly to collection development, including selection, acquisition, accessioning and cataloguing. Other Non-collection capital expenditure relates to building refurbishments, software, plant and equipment. The actual variation against the target in this category relates mostly to revised timing for two major projects, the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project and the Reading Room Integration project. In respect of Other (non-collection development) labour costs, the variation was brought about, firstly, by reduced expenditure overall that was mostly driven by the underspend in Non-collection capital and, secondly, by salary spending on extra strategic projects.

Government Priority: Collection Management and Access

The following tables (Tables 3.13 to 3.17) provide data relating respectively to acquisitions, accessions, access, conservation and preservation, and the digitisation of the collection.

Table 3.13: Acquisition

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Number of acquisitions

132,634

107,400

58,400

58,400

58,400

The target was exceeded.

Table 3.14: Accessions

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Number of objects accessioned

48,428

47,000

52,250

52,250

52,250

Number of objects awaiting accessioning 3,336 8,294 2,750 2,750 2,750
Percentage of total objects accessioned 94.00 85.00 95.00 95.00 95.00

The targets were met. At the beginning of the year, it had been anticipated that the introduction of the new Resource Description and Access cataloguing rules would have a significant impact on accessioning timeframes. The impact was less than expected, resulting in an increase in the number of objects accessioned and a decrease in the number of objects awaiting accessioning.

Table 3.15: Access (percentage of the collection available)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

To the public (records in the catalogue)

92.10

90.00

90.00

90.00

90.00

To the public online

3.60

3.64

3.84

4.04

4.52

The target for the percentage of the collection available to the public was exceeded, due to the completion of the Chinese Card Catalogue Conversion project.

Table 3.16: Conservation/Preservation (as a percentage of total objects)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Number of objects assessed/condition checked 4.02 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00
Number of objects prepared for display or digitisation 0.03 - - - -
Number of items treated for preservation purposes only 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

The number of collection items assessed for preservation purposes was not met. There were fewer items than anticipated requiring condition checking. The condition of all new collection material is routinely checked, as are items requested for use onsite, through interlibrary loans, and for exhibitions. The number of collection items assessed for preservation purposes is below target because the condition of material requested for use is assessed before it is issued, and use of printed material has significantly declined this year.

Table 3.17: Digitisation (percentage of the collection digitised)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Percentage of the total collection digitised

3.30

3.00

3.00

4.00

4.00

The target was exceeded.

Government Priority: Education

Table 3.18 shows that the target for participation in the Library’s learning and school education programs was exceeded. This was predominantly a result of significantly underestimated numbers of online visits to the Treasure Explorer website. Attendances at the Learning Program sessions were on par with expectations, although an increasing number of attendees referred to difficulties in finding a parking spot.

Table 3.18: Participation in Public and School Programs

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Learning and school education programs

43,743

12,500

12,500

13,700

13,700