Twelve Queensland groups will receive grants to help preserve the state’s heritage following the announcement of the 2010 Community Heritage Grants.

The successful and popular program is providing grants worth $78,200 to 12 community groups and organisations around the state in 2010. The groups include museums, historical and heritage societies, Indigenous and community organisations. Each will receive funds to assist in the preservation of community owned but nationally significant heritage collections.

Highlights include $7,000 to the Brisbane Tramway Museum Society for a preservation needs assessment of the collection; $8,000 to the Queensland Folk Federation Inc for a significance assessment and preservation needs assessment of the collection; Museum and Gallery Services Queensland received $10, 300 to conduct collection management workshops in Far North Queensland; and $4,000 went to the Queensland Country Women’s Association for a significance assessment of the collection.

Recipients attend a three-day intensive preservation and collection management workshop held at the National Library, the National Archives of Australia, the National Museum of Australia and the National Film and Sound Archive in Canberra.

National Library Acting Director-General Warwick Cathro said the Community Heritage Grants program showed the commitment by the National Library, along with its partner institutions and the Federal Government, to encourage and assist communities to care for the nation’s heritage, whether held in capital cities, regional centres or remote areas.

“These grants are a reminder that if we don’t preserve our history now, it could be lost forever,” he said.

“The national collecting institutions that support this program are delighted that practical assistance is being provided to communities to ensure that their local heritage collections are still there for future generations.”

The grant money is used for significance assessments, preservation needs assessments, conservation treatments, preservation training, digitisation, and purchasing archival-quality storage materials or environmental monitoring equipment.

The Community Heritage Grants Program is managed by the National Library. It is funded by the Australian Government through the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Office for the Arts; the National Archives of Australia; the National Film and Sound Archive; the National Museum of Australia and the National Library.

Contacts:
Sally Hopman, Media Liaison Manager, 02 6262 1704; 0401 226 697; shopman@nla.gov.au
Dianne Dahlitz, CHG Coordinator, 02 6262 1147; chg@nla.gov.au


QUEENSLAND

Abbey Museum of Art and Archaeology received $3,400 to conduct a significance assessment of the collection. The collection of over 5,500 artefacts includes jewellery, coins, medals and ritual objects from many countries including Australia.

Australian Country Hospital Heritage Association Inc received $4,000 for a significance assessment of the collection. The collection includes nursing records dating back to 1885, uniforms, medical instruments and equipment, photographs and oral histories reflecting the history of nursing in Queensland. Records documenting the work of Sister Kenny with polio patients are of significance.

Burdekin Library received $4,700 for a significance assessment and a preservation needs assessment of the Mirka Mora mural Painting of Life. The mural was painted in 1984, hangs inside the library and was inspired by the history of the region. In particular it relates to the story of a shipwrecked sailor who lived with the local traditional owners prior to European settlement.

Girl Guides Queensland received $4,000 for a preservation needs assessment of the archive and museum collection. This nationally significant collection of approximately 7,000 items and organisational archive reflects all aspects of Guiding in Queensland dating back to 1910. Photographs, memorabilia, uniforms, badges are significant items in the collection.

Mareeba Heritage Centre Inc received $4,000 for a preservation needs assessment of the Tobacco industry in North Queensland 1928-2004 collection. The collection includes artefacts from all eras of the tobacco industry and from all associated activity – land clearing, planting, cultivation, harvesting, curing and usage. It provides a unique history of the industry in Australia.

Museum and Gallery Services Queensland received $10,300 to conduct Collection Management and Preventative Conservation workshops in Far North Queensland (Atherton and Cooktown regions). The organisations benefitting from the training include regional museums, heritage centres and art galleries. The training will assist the organisations to participate in museum standards programs.

National Trust of Queensland received $14,000 for conservation treatments, environmental control equipment and collections care and management training workshops for the Atherton Chinatown and James Cook Museum, Cooktown collections. The Atherton collection contains Chinese and Chinese Australian artefacts including puppets, domestic wares, artworks and archaeological items from the nearby site of early Chinese settlement. The James Cook Museum contains a wide range of artefacts relating to the history of the region.

North Stradbroke Island Historical Museum received $6,800 for a preservation needs assessment of the collection and preservation training. Nationally significant items in the collection are the Dunwich Benevolent Asylum collection which reflect the history of the asylum; the Oodgeroo collection (personal papers and memorabilia); and the stretcher from the Australian Hospital Ship Centaur which sank in 1943 with the loss of 268 lives.

Queensland Country Women’s Association received $4.000 for a significance assessment of the collection. The collection comprises textiles, organisational records, craft items, furniture, decorative arts, memorabilia and photographs documenting activity of the Queensland Country Women’s Association since its commencement in 1922.

Queensland Folk Federation Inc received $8,000 for a significance assessment and preservation needs assessment of the collection. The collection comprises archives, documents, artefacts, artwork, ephemera, still photographs and audiovisual material representing the history of the cultural activities of the Queensland Folk Federation over the past 24 years, including the Woodford Folk Festival, the Dreaming and the Planting Festivals.

The Brisbane Tramway Museum Society received $7,000 for a preservation needs assessment of the collection including archival items and metal objects. The archive collection includes manuals, plans, destination rolls, photographs and advertising signs. Restored trams dating back to 1989 are a highlight of the collection.

Thoroughbred Racing History Association Inc received $8,800 for a significance assessment and preservation needs assessment of the collection. The collection comprises letters and organisation records, photographs, racebooks (dating back to 1880) trophies and sashes and memorabilia reflecting the history of the racing industry in Australian, and in particular, Queensland.