Annual Report 2011 - 2012

Annual Report - Introduction

Published by the National Library of Australia
Parkes Place
Canberra ACT 2600
T 02 6262 1111
F 02 6257 1703
National Relay Service 133 677
http://www.nla.gov.au/corporate-documents/annual-reports

 ABN 28 346 858 075

© National Library of Australia 2012

National Library of Australia
Annual report / National Library of Australia.—8th (1967/68)—
Canberra: NLA, 1968–—v.; 25 cm.
Annual.
Continues: National Library of Australia. Council. Annual report of the Council = 
ISSN 0069-0082.
Report year ends 30 June.
ISSN 0313-1971 = Annual report—National Library of Australia.
1. National Library of Australia—Periodicals.
027.594

Prepared by the Executive and Public Programs Division

The images throughout this report are of the National Library of Australia’s Treasures Gallery or of items on display in the Treasures Gallery.

Letter to the Minister

Annual Report - Chair's Report

The Hon. James. J. Spigelman AC This year has been one of culmination and of planning. It was a year of assessment of the successful implementation of the Library’s Strategic Directions 2009–11 and of deliberation and promulgation of Strategic Directions 2012–14.

After many years of planning and development, the Library opened its permanent Treasures Gallery and the adjoining Exhibition Gallery. The Treasures Gallery, for the first time, highlights our national heritage from the permanent collection. The Exhibition Gallery opened to universal acclaim, with Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin succeeded by an equally well-received Australian exhibition to mark the centenary of the birth of Patrick White. 

The Library’s 14-year campaign to extend the statutory requirement for the deposit of published material beyond print to encompass e-publications and public websites, to which I referred in last year’s Annual Report, reached a critical stage. In February, the Attorney-General released the consultation paper, Extending Legal Deposit. The paper invites public submissions on how best to preserve Australia’s digital heritage. Every year of delay has meant that part of the heritage has been lost forever. The Library looks forward to the successful culmination of this project.

The transition to a digital information environment is the great challenge facing libraries throughout the world. The success of the Library’s discovery and access service, Trove, which builds on collaboration with Australia’s state libraries and other cultural organisations, was manifest in widespread praise and increased usage over the course of the year. There is, however, a long way to go.

In the absence of new funding for digitising the permanent collection, the amount of additional material made accessible each year to readers and researchers throughout Australia, not just those who live in or who can visit Canberra, is limited. Therefore, the Library welcomed the provision of additional funding in the 2012 Commonwealth Budget to assist the Library to make its collection more accessible over the next few years. The Library has taken steps to place itself in a position to undertake the transition to a National Digital Library of Australia by redirecting resources to a five-year Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project, which will replace existing electronic systems and provide the tools needed to acquire, preserve, deliver and give access to the nation’s existing and future digital information.

The three-year program, set out in Strategic Directions 2012–14, reflects the enhanced priority given to digital collecting. Some difficult decisions have been made, particularly to reduce the extent to which overseas printed material is collected. The Library has commenced a transition from print to digital for some forms of overseas collecting.

I will retire as Chair as and from 30 June 2012. I do so because of my new responsibilities as Chair of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. My association with the Library has been exceptionally rewarding, which I attribute to the professionalism and skill of the staff and the dedication of my fellow Council members.

The Hon. James. J. Spigelman AC

Annual Report - Director-General’s Review

Director-General Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich The National Library of Australia’s Strategic Directions 2012–14, which the Chair has noted, recognises that continuity and change characterise the work of the Library. In 2011–12, the Library has seen significant achievements in planning and preparing for change and in pursuing long-term goals.

The Library’s strategic thinking has been informed by trends in use, information seeking and publishing. We have also referred to consultation papers and reviews, such as the National Cultural Policy Discussion Paper, the Book Industry Strategy Group’s Final Report, the review of philanthropy, the development of the 2011 Strategic Roadmap for Australian Research Infrastructure and the review of Australia’s engagement in Asia.

If the Library is to succeed in the digital world, it is vital that it has the capacity to acquire, manage, preserve and provide access to petabyte-level information. The alternative is a significant and growing gap in Australia’s documentary memory. In the short term, the Library will meet its essential minimum requirements by redirecting internal resources, including IT resources, to focus on the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement (DLIR) project.

The DLIR project commenced in early 2011 and runs over five financial years. It will replace existing systems that form the backbone of the Library’s digital library infrastructure and will deliver capabilities for digital preservation and online deposit, as well as the ability to support an extended range of digital formats.

Central to the project is an open approach to the market, with the aim of purchasing existing software or services to deliver the software, supplemented by in-house development activities to implement components that cannot be purchased. Formal project governance and management processes have been established and the procurement process almost completed. The implementation phase will commence in the new financial year.

Over the last decade, in response to the dramatic effect of digital technology on information dissemination, the Library has advocated for change to the legal deposit provisions of the Copyright Act 1968 (section 201). The Library advocates the inclusion of publications, such as CD-ROMs, DVDs, websites, blogs and electronic books, journals, magazines and newspapers, in the requirement that a copy of material published in Australia be delivered to the Library.

In early 2011, the Library welcomed the Attorney-General’s establishment of a working group to consider the Library’s legal deposit requirements and to prepare a public consultation paper on the issue. The paper, Extending Legal Deposit, was issued by the Attorney-General on 7 March 2012. It presented a model for how an extended scheme would apply to both online and offline e-publications on a physical carrier. 

Last financial year, the Library began a review of its collecting of books and journals published overseas. It assessed options for reducing the cost associated with acquiring and processing overseas materials, taking into account the needs of researchers and trends and developments in information dissemination, such as e-publishing and mass digitisation. The review was completed in August 2011 and the Library has begun implementing the recommendations. This includes immediate work to make processes more efficient and a long-term strategy to shift the Library’s largely print collecting model to a digital collecting and access model over the next five years. This means that, where possible, the Library will collect e-books and e-journals and it will provide access to freely available digital content hosted elsewhere, instead of collecting print versions. In addition, the Library will reduce its total expenditure on overseas resources, in order to release funds for strategic priorities, such as digitising more of the Australian Collection. As a consequence, the range of overseas resources accessible from the Library will decrease and a significant number of print journal subscriptions and electronic services will be cancelled. This will be reflected in a revised Collection Development Policy, which will be developed early next financial year. The Library will continue to give priority to both print and digital publications in Asian languages.

Over the course of the year, the Library initiated and completed some 20 projects aimed at advancing digital readiness and services. These are outlined in the Report of Operations.

The knowledge, expertise and skills of Library staff are vital to the advancement of the Library’s work, particularly as we seek to strengthen our digital capacity. In developing the Strategic Workforce Plan (2012–14), the Library has placed a premium on building expertise, skills and confidence to work in the digital world. 

On 6 October 2011, the Treasures Gallery was opened by the Governor-General, Ms Quentin Bryce AC CVO, marking the culmination of many years of planning. The gallery provides the Library with a world-class space in which to display its treasures. Over 95,000 visitors have enjoyed the gallery since its opening. Treasure Explorer, the website developed for primary school children (http://treasure-explorer.nla.gov.au), and new education programs centred on the gallery are extending the appreciation of the Library’s collection and the stories it reveals about Australian history and culture. The Treasures Gallery Family Day attracted 2,500 people to a wide variety of activities, including lectures, behind-the-scenes tours and craft programs.

The opening of the Treasures Gallery marked the successful conclusion of the major capital fundraising campaign led by the Development Council. To build on this success, the National Library of Australia Foundation Board was established to consolidate and further the work of the Development Council in seeking support for the Library’s priorities.

In association with the completion of the Treasures Gallery, other major works were completed on the Ground Floor. A new entrance was created for the Main Reading Room, with a new service desk, an improved display of new collection items and an informal area for group work. The Library’s Bookshop, which specialises in Australian publications, was also refurbished. Visitors have welcomed the improved Bookshop and sales of exhibition-related merchandise have been particularly strong.

In November 2011, Nobel Laureate Professor Brian Schmidt launched Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, the inaugural exhibition in the Library’s new Exhibition Gallery. Handwritten was a highly successful international collaboration, with government and corporate support valued at over $800,000. The public response was enthusiastic—73,000 visitors viewed the works of some of the most significant contributors to the development of Western thought and creativity, including Copernicus, Galileo, Dante, Einstein, Mozart and Beethoven.

The reporting year has seen excellent progress in the Library’s fundamental work on developing the national collection, promoting access and engaging audiences, collaboration and leadership, and achieving organisational excellence. The Library’s success in collection building is reported in Appendix J, which features acquisition highlights.

Digitisation activities remain an important priority for the Library. Collaborative projects undertaken this year have included:

  • digitising regional Victorian newspapers, funded by the State Library of Victoria
  • digitising The Mirror (Perth) and The Northern Times (Carnarvon, WA), funded by the State Library of Western Australia
  • digitising The Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Hobart), funded by the Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office
  • digitising The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate (NSW), funded by the Western Plains Cultural Centre.

On 2 November 2011, the Library marked the 30th anniversary of the Australian National Bibliographic Database, which lies at the heart of Trove. Twelve hundred libraries across Australia currently contribute catalogue records, describing books, journals, websites, pictures, maps, manuscripts, audiovisual materials and local history collections. The database enables efficiency in local cataloguing operations and makes collections discoverable by all Australians.

Trove continues to be central to accessing the collections of the Library and of Australian collecting institutions of all kinds. More than 50,000 people use the service daily, many of them on mobile devices. Scholars particularly value Trove’s digitised content, which has revolutionised their research and opened new possibilities for enquiry. Thousands of users engage enthusiastically with Trove—annotating, tagging and correcting computer-generated newspaper text or adding their own digital content to the service. Since April 2012, individuals and agencies have been able to use new functionality to engage further with Trove records—tags and comments can now be retrieved using an application programming interface, opening new possibilities for displaying Trove content in other services. In October 2011, Trove again attracted international recognition, when it was nominated in the European Digital Heritage Awards as one of the top-five global crowd-sourcing projects.

Highlights of the Library’s events program included the Ray Mathew Lecture ‘Prodigal Daughter’, delivered by writer Susan Johnson, and the Seymour Biography Lecture ‘Pushing against the Dark: Writing about the Hidden Self’, presented by author Robert Dessaix. The Library was also the venue for two significant national events: the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards 2011 and the launch of the National Year of Reading 2012, an initiative of the library profession to improve Australian literacy rates by encouraging Australians to become a nation of readers.

The Friends of the Library hosted a strong program of events for its 2,000 members. The two major events—the celebration of Australian author Alex Miller and the Kenneth Myer Lecture
‘Why Did I Do That? A Fresh Look at the Psychology of Human Motivation’, delivered by Hugh Mackay—attracted good audiences.

Social media is playing an increasingly important role in the Library’s communication, promotion, development and delivery of services and the collection. The Library’s Facebook and Twitter accounts have 9,000 followers collectively. Social media helps the Library to reach new audiences. For example, on 2 March 2012, a tweet relating to a Dr Seuss sketch in the Library’s collection was retweeted over 650 times, reaching an additional 50,000 Twitter users, and the link to the item was viewed 3,233 times. The Trove Twitter account provides followers with topical links to related historical newspaper and other content, and is an ideal channel to communicate new service developments and for Trove users to communicate with the Library and with each other. In September 2011, there was an equally strong response to the release on Flickr Commons of images from the Library’s collection; within a few hours the images had been viewed over 10,000 times. The Library will continue to explore and exploit the potential of new social media channels.

The Library has continued its efforts to achieve Reimagining Libraries, the vision of National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA). Library staff have led and contributed actively to NSLA groups, working on a range of strategic priorities to improve and harmonise public access to collections and services.

As a result of Reimagining Libraries activities, Australians can experience consistent approaches to services across all NSLA libraries. Registered patrons of the National Library and of Australian state and territory libraries can access a core set of e-resources, with most products available
for offsite use in homes, schools and offices. Articles from some licensed resources can be
accessed via Trove. To enable their patrons to access resources which are not available in digital form, NSLA libraries are collaborating to streamline and align document delivery services.

NSLA groups will also continue to work on important physical and digital infrastructure issues which will benefit library users for generations to come. Groups working on collaborative collecting, storage for physical collections and the challenges of collecting, preserving and providing access to digital heritage are all focused on efficient long-term access to Australia’s documentary heritage.

As it enters its eighteenth year, the Community Heritage Grants program continues to be an important source of support for community groups. The program is managed by the Library on behalf of funding partners, including the Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport Office for the Arts, the National Archives of Australia, the National Museum of Australia and the National Film and Sound Archive. Grants of up to $15,000 are awarded to libraries, archives, museums, genealogical and historical societies and multicultural and Indigenous groups. In 2011, $409,000 was distributed to 82 organisations, half of the recipients being in regional and remote Australia. Following a concerted awareness campaign, it is pleasing to note that almost ten per cent of recipients are Indigenous organisations. The 2012 grant round closed on 4 May and received 181 applications.

Staff voted in favor of a new Enterprise Agreement, which became operational on 30 November 2011. The negotiations resulted in greater engagement between staff and management.

The Library has continued to prioritise improving workplace health and safety. As well as implementing stronger governance regimes linked to the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, there has been a focus on training and awareness of issues, including work–life balance, stress management and resilience, risk management, dealing with hazardous substances, working with contractors and first aid.

On 30 June 2012, the Hon. James J. Spigelman AC relinquished the Chair of the National Library of Australia Council. Over the last two years he has been a formidable advocate for the Library, advancing its work in several vital areas. The Library shall be the poorer for his departure.

This report provides me with a welcome opportunity to thank the Library’s volunteers, Friends, members of the Development Council (now the Foundation Board), donors and partners. The generosity with which they deploy their time, energy, goodwill and expertise on behalf of the Library is inspiring. 

It is with gratitude I note that the counsel received from colleagues in the Office for the Arts was, as always, immensely useful. 

Staff of the National Library take pride in advancing the institution’s role in supporting learning, scholarship, curiosity and cultural life. They respond to change and pursue vital long-term goals with industry, innovation and intelligence, conscious of the extraordinary legacy of which they are stewards. The pages ahead tell the story.

In the coming year, the Library will advance its strategic directions, appreciative that it will benefit from the measure announced in the 2012–13 Commonwealth Budget that provides supplementation for national collecting institutions and grateful to be among the cultural institutions exempted from the application of an additional efficiency dividend of 2.5 per cent.
To ensure that Australians can access, enjoy and learn from a national collection that documents Australian life and society, the Library seeks to accelerate digitising the collection, to focus on digital collecting and preservation, to improve reading-room facilities for special collections and to commemorate the Centenary of Canberra.

Anne-Marie Schwirtlich

Annual Report - Summary of Financial Performance

Operating Outcome

During 2011–12, income, including revenue from government, amounted to $66.616 million and expenses were $76.440 million, resulting in a deficit of $9.824 million. From an income-statement perspective, the Library does not receive appropriation funding for depreciation of the national collection (totalling $12.024 million), which forms part of operating expenses. Government funding for the purchase of collection material is provided through an equity injection totalling $9.779 million.

Income

The total income of $66.616 million for 2011–12 was $3.761 million above budget and compares to total actual income of $64.418 million for 2010–11. Figure 1.1 shows a comparison of income across items against budget for 2011–12 and 2010–11.

Figure 1.1: Income, 2011–12 and 2010–11Figure 1.1: Income, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

Figure 1.1: Income, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format
 Actual 2011–12Budget 2011–12Actual 2010–11
Revenue from government48.98948.98949.105
Sales of goods and services8.9078.0387.780
Interest2.9882.2803.333
All other income5.7323.5484.200
Total66.61662.85564.418

The major variations between financial years relate to increases in the sales of goods and services ($1.127 million), largely due to an increase in revenue received from digitising other library collections, increased sales through the Bookshop and sponsorship revenue associated with the Library’s exhibition program; increases in other revenue ($1.613 million), largely due to increased grant and donation revenue; and reductions in interest revenue ($0.345 million) and revenue from government ($0.116 million). The decline in interest revenue is primarily the result of reduced deposit rates received during 2011–12.

Expenses

The total expenses of $76.440 million for 2011–12 were $0.216 million above budget and $4.458 million more than 2010–11. Figure 1.2 shows a comparison of expenditure across items and against budget for 2011–12 and 2010–11.

Figure 1.2: Expenses, 2011–12 and 2010–11Figure 1.2: Expenses, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

Figure 1.2: Expenses, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format
 Actual 2011–12Budget 2011–12Actual 2010–11
Employees39.18237.01636.016
Suppliers17.10017.40116.214
Depreciation and amortisation19.39221.21419.029
Other0.7660.5930.723
Total76.44076.22471.982

Employee expenses were $3.166 million more than 2010–11. This is the result of a combination of factors, including a net increase in leave expenses ($1.842 million), of which $1.254 million is due to the movements in the long-term bond rate during 2011–12, which has the effect of increasing the value of the liability; reduced capitalisation of staff time ($0.401 million) associated with the production of internally developed software and with the digitising of collection material, which has the effect of increasing salary expenditure; and base salary increases and a small productivity payment provided to staff under the Library’s Enterprise Agreement and partially offset by a small reduction in staff numbers (8.9 average staffing level).

Supplier expenses were higher ($0.886 million) than 2010–11, largely due to increased cost of goods sold ($0.193 million), primarily as a result of increased sales through the Library’s Bookshop, and increased promotional expenses ($0.585 million), largely associated with the opening of the Library’s Treasures Gallery and the exhibition, Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin. Much of the additional expenditure associated with the exhibition was funded by the receipt of sponsorship revenue.

Depreciation and amortisation expenses were $0.363 million higher than 2010–11. The primary reason for the variation is increased depreciation of plant and equipment ($0.242 million),
largely the result of the replacement of existing assets.

Equity

In 2011–12, the Library’s total equity increased by $86.766 million to $1,776.531 million. The net increase is a result of an equity injection for collection acquisitions ($9.779 million), a net revaluation increment ($86.811 million) following the revaluation of the Library’s collection, land and buildings, and the net operating result ($9.824 million) for 2011–12.

Total Assets

Figure 1.3 shows that the total value of the Library’s assets increased by $86.339 million to $1,793.712 million in 2011–12.

Figure 1.3: Total Assets, 2011–12 and 2010–11Figure 1.3: Total Assets, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

Figure 1.3: Total Assets, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format
 Actual 30 June 2012Actual 30 June 2011
Financial assets54.366m56.194m
Inventories and other3.840m3.893m
Intangibles—software4.102m4.663m
The National Collection1,516.170m1,435.175m
Plant and equipment13.289m12.937m
Land and buildings201.945m194.511m
Total1,793.712m1,707.373m

The increase in non-financial assets ($88.167 million) is largely the result of the revaluation of the Library’s collections, land and buildings (a net increment of $86.811 million) and the net difference between current-year assets acquisitions, disposals and current-year depreciation expenses ($1.409 million). In addition, there was an increase in the value of inventories ($0.089 million) and a reduction in the value of prepaid supplier expenses ($0.142 million). The decrease in financial assets ($1.828 million) relates primarily to a reduction in receivables ($0.676 million), a reduction in cash at bank ($0.781 million) and a reduction in investments ($0.579 million).

Total Liabilities

As Figure 1.4 shows, the Library’s total liabilities reduced by $0.427 million from last financial year to $17.181 million.

Figure 1.4: Total Liabilities, 2011–12 and 2010–11Figure 1.4: Total Liabilities, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

Figure 1.4: Total Liabilities, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format
 Actual 30 June 2012Actual 30 June 2011
Employee provisions12.279m11.001m
Payable4.902m6.607m
Total17.181m17.608m

The changes in liabilities relate to a reduction in supplier payables ($1.971 million) and increases in grants payable ($0.007 million), employee provisions ($1.278 million) and other payables ($0.259 million).

Cash Flow 

In 2011–12 there was a reduction in the Library’s cash balance, which decreased by $0.781 million to $5.443 million as at 30 June 2012. Figure 1.5 shows a comparison of cash flow items for 2011–12 and 2010–11.

Figure 1.5: Net Cash Flow, 2011–12 and 2010–11Figure 1.5: Net Cash Flow, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Figure 1.5: Net Cash Flow, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format
 Actual 30 June 2012Actual 30 June 2011
Net operating8.259m10.625m
Net investing-18.819m-18.280m
Net financing9.779m9.743m
Total-0.781m2.088m

The decrease in net cash from operating activities ($2.366 million) reflects the comments under ‘Income’ and ‘Expenses’. The increase in net cash used by investing activities ($0.539 million) primarily reflects the net movement of funds from investments to cash at bank between years ($4.391 million), a decrease in the investment in property, plant and equipment and intangibles ($4.452 million) and a decrease in proceeds from the sales of property, plant and equipment as a consequence of the sale in 2010–11 of an apartment gifted to the Library ($0.600 million). The decrease in the investment in property, plant and equipment and intangibles is largely the result of increased building expenditure during 2010–11 as a result of the construction of the new Treasures Gallery. There was a minor increase in net cash from financing activities between financial years ($0.036 million), as a result of the Library’s equity injection provided by government to fund collection acquisitions being slightly increased.

Annual Report - Corporate Overview

Annual Report - Role

The functions of the Library are set out in of the National Library Act 1960 (section 6). They are:

  • to maintain and develop a national collection of library material, including a comprehensive collection of library material relating to Australia and the Australian people
  • to make library material in the national collection available to such persons and institutions, and in such manner and subject to such conditions, as the Council determines, with a view to the most advantageous use of that collection in the national interest
  • to make available such other services in relation to library matters and library material (including bibliographical services) as the Council thinks fit and, in particular, services for the purposes of:
    • the library of the Parliament
    • the authorities of the Commonwealth
    • the Territories
    • the Agencies (within the meaning of the Public Service Act 1999)
  • to cooperate in library matters (including the advancement of library science) with authorities or persons, whether in Australia or elsewhere, concerned with library matters.

The Library is one of several agencies within the Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport portfolio with responsibilities for collecting Australian cultural heritage materials and making them available to the Australian public. The Library was part of the Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio until 14 December 2012. The Minister for the Arts, the Hon. Simon Crean MP, has responsibility for the Library. The affairs of the Library are conducted by the National Library Council, with the Director-General as the executive officer.

Annual Report - Legislation

The Library was established by the National Library Act 1960, which defines the Library’s role, corporate governance and financial management framework. As a Commonwealth statutory authority, the Library is subject to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act), which provides the reporting and accountability framework.

Annual Report - Organisation

The Library’s senior management structure comprises the Director-General and six Assistant Directors-General.

Figure 2.1 shows the Library’s organisational and senior management structure.

Figure 2.1 shows the Library’s organisational and senior management structure.

    Director-General Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich
  • Collections Management - Ms Pam Gatenby Assistant Director-General
    • Australian Collections
    • Management and Preservation
    • Digitisation and Photography
    • Overseas Collections Management
    • Serials Collection Management and Standards
    • Web Archiving and Digital Preservation
  • Australian Collections and Reader Services - Ms Margy Burn Assistant Director-General
    • Collection Delivery and Storage
    • Maps
    • Oral History and Folklore
    • Pictures and Manuscripts
    • Reader Services
  • Resource Sharing - Dr Marie-Louise Ayres Assistant Director-General
    • Collaborative Services
    • Database Services
  • Information Technology - Mr Mark Corbould Assistant Director-General
    • Collection Access
    • Collection Infrastructure
    • IT Services
    • Web Publishing
  • Executive and Public Programs - Ms Jasmine Cameron Assistant Director-General
    • Communications and Marketing
    • Development
    • Education and Events
    • Executive Support
    • Exhibitions
    • Publications and Sales and Promotion
  • Corporate Services - Mr Gerry Linehan Assistant Director-General
    • Accountability and Reform
    • Building and Security Services
    • Contracts and Legal Support
    • Finance
    • Human Resources

Annual Report - Corporate Governance

Figure 2.2 shows the key elements of the Library’s corporate governance structure.

Figure 2.2 shows the key elements of the Library’s corporate governance
                structure.

Council

The National Library Act 1960 provides that a council shall conduct the affairs of the Library. The Council has 12 members, including the Director-General, one senator elected by the Senate and one member of the House of Representatives elected by the House.

At 30 June 2012, there was one vacancy on Council. Appendix A lists Council members and their attendance at Council meetings.

In 2011–12, in addition to general administrative compliance and financial matters, Council considered a range of matters, including:

  • the Library’s Strategic Directions 2012–14
  • the implications and governance of new work health and safety legislation
  • budget trend analysis information
  • potential revenue-raising opportunities from Library activities
  • new acquisitions
  • the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement (DLIR) project
  • the National Cultural Policy
  • the Strategic Workforce Plan
  • environmental management
  • community language newspaper digitisation
  • the Library’s Asian Collection
  • building works and maintenance plans
  • extension of legal deposit provisions
  • new key performance indicators for 2012–13 for Australian Government arts and culture agencies.

The Council has two advisory committees: the Audit Committee and the Corporate Governance Committee .

Audit Committee

The role of the Audit Committee is to:

  • support the Library and Council members in complying with their obligations under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997
  • provide a forum for communication among Council members, senior managers and internal and external auditors
  • ensure there is an appropriate ethical climate in the Library and review policies relating to internal controls and risk management.

The Audit Committee comprises a minimum of three non-executive Council members. If required, Council may appoint external members to the Audit Committee. The Council Chair and Director-General also attend meetings. Details of Audit Committee members and meeting attendance can be found at Appendix A.

In 2011–12, the Audit Committee considered a range of matters, including:

  • financial statements for 2010–11
  • fraud risk assessment and the Fraud Control Plan 2012–13
  • harmonisation of work health and safety legislation
  • Library trust-account disbursements
  • internal assessment of Audit Committee performance
  • internal audit schedule
  • Australian National Audit Office 2011–12 financial statement audit strategy
  • compliance report
  • internal audit plan
  • internal audits of:
    • management of capital works
    • post-implementation review of the Bookshop stock control system
    • Sales and Promotion and Bookshop annual stocktake
    • control framework maturity assessment
    • GST/FBT compliance and business continuity planning
  • reports on legal services, compliance, fraud management, risk management and business continuity, contract management and training.

Corporate Governance Committee

The role of the Corporate Governance Committee is to:

  • evaluate Council’s effectiveness in its corporate governance role
  • evaluate the Director-General’s performance and remuneration 
  • oversee the development of a list of prospective members for appointment to Council, subject to consideration and approval by the Minister.

The Corporate Governance Committee comprises three non-executive Council members—the Chair, the Deputy Chair and the Chair of the Audit Committee—and has the authority to coopt non-executive Council members.

Appendix A lists the Corporate Governance Committee members. In February 2012, the Corporate Governance Committee met to consider a Council evaluation and, in June 2012,
it met to discuss the Director-General’s performance
.

Corporate Management Group

The Corporate Management Group (CMG), consisting of the Director-General and the six senior executive service (SES) staff, provides strategic and operational leadership for the Library.In particular, it monitors the achievement of objectives and strategies, oversees budget matters, develops policy, coordinates activities across the organisation and oversees a range of operational issues. CMG meets weekly.

A number of cross-organisational committees advise CMG in key areas, such as workforce planning, asset management, building works, collection development and management, events and education, exhibitions and publications.

Corporate Planning Framework

The Balanced Scorecard continues to be the Library’s principal planning support system, facilitating the integration of strategic, operational and budget planning. Since its introduction in 2000–01, the Balanced Scorecard has proven to be a successful performance management tool accepted by staff and other stakeholders. All scorecard achievements, initiatives and targets are reviewed regularly as part of strategic management planning and monitoring processes.

Risk Management Framework

The Library’s Risk Management Framework continues to provide effective tools for the identification and evaluation of and response to risks that may affect the collection, core business functions and resources and/or strategic decision making. The Library’s Risk Management Register, which is subject to annual review, is central to this framework. The register lists risks to the Library, as well as risk-reduction strategies. These strategies are managed through established procedures and plans, such as the Collection Disaster Plan, the IT Disaster Recovery Plan, the Business Contingency Plan for Critical Building Systems and the Business Continuity Plan.

Risk management within the Library is overseen by the Library’s Emergency Planning Committee, which is chaired by the Assistant Director-General, Corporate Services, and includes SES staff representing all business areas. The committee provides a clear control structure to identify, monitor, respond to and mitigate risks that may affect the Library.

Following completion of Strategic Directions 2012–14, the Library undertook a legal risk-management review to help safeguard the organisation against high-level risks associated with reputation, litigation and professional exposure. Although no major residual risks were discerned, the review was useful for both Trove and the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project.

Annual Report - Public Accountability

External and Internal Audit

The Library’s Audit Committee met three times to consider external and internal audit reports.

Australian National Audit Office Reports

Australian National Audit Office reports containing Auditor-General recommendations implemented by the Library during 2011–12 were:

  • Green Office Procurement and Sustainable Office Management (2008–09, No. 25)
  • Direct Source Procurement (2010–11, No. 11)
  • Capitalisation of Software (2010–11, No. 14)
  • The Protection and Security of Electronic Information Held by Australian Government Agencies (2010–11, No. 33)
  • Development and Implementation of Key Performance Indicators to Support the Outcomes and Outputs Framework (2011–12, No. 5)
  • Information and Communications Technology Security: Management of Portable Storage Devices (2011–12, No. 18).
  • Establishment and Use of Procurement Panels (2011–12, No. 31)
  • Development and Approval of Grant Program Guidelines (2011–12, No. 36).

Internal Audit Reports

The Audit Committee considered a number of internal audit reports, as listed on page 23.

Parliamentary Committees and Government Inquiries

The Library made a submission responding to the Attorney-General’s public consultation
paper, Extending Legal Deposit, and a submission responding to the National Cultural Policy Discussion Paper.

Ministerial Directions

Under section 48A of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act), the Minister for Finance and Deregulation (Finance Minister) may make a General Policy Order specifying an Australian Government general policy applicable to the Library, provided the Finance Minister is satisfied the Minister for the Arts has consulted the Library on the application of the policy. No General Policy Orders applying to the Library were made in 2011–12, although Council provided input into a General Policy Order proposing that the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines apply to agencies operating under the CAC Act. The Australian Government general policies that apply to the Library under section 28 of the CAC Act are:

  • Foreign Exchange Risk Management Policy
  • Australian Government Cost Recovery Guidelines
  • National Code of Practice for the Construction Industry.

Legal Action

A claim that was lodged in the ACT Supreme Court in 2003 on behalf of Wagdy Hanna and Associates Pty Ltd, seeking damages for an alleged disclosure of information in respect of a 1996 tender process for one of the Library’s offsite storage facilities, remains outstanding. The court proceedings were held in December 2008, with Justice Richard Refshauge reserving his decision. The Library is awaiting the judgment.

Ombudsman

During 2011–12, no issues relating to the Library were referred to the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

Australian Human Rights Commission

A visitor has lodged a complaint with the Australian Human Rights Commission alleging that the Library indirectly discriminated against the person on the grounds of disability. The Library is defending the claim and its actions, asserting there has been no unlawful discrimination.

Freedom of Information

The Library received and granted access to two requests under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) and a third was received on 30 June 2012. 

In December 2011, the Library was advised that the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner had closed an application for a review of a Library FOI decision in 2010–11. The commissioner advised that the application was invalid and the matter is finalised.

Agencies subject to the FOI Act are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with IPS requirements. The Library complies with IPS requirements and a link to the scheme is provided on the Library’s website (nla.gov.au/corporate-documents/information-publication-scheme).

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums

The premiums under the Library’s insurance coverage with Comcover encompass general liability, directors’ and officers’ indemnity, property loss, damage or destruction, business interruption and consequential loss, motor vehicles, personal accidents and official
overseas travel.

The Library’s insurance premium received an 8.8 per cent discount as a result of its performance measured by Comcover’s Risk Management Benchmarking Survey. Under the terms of the insurance schedule of cover, the Library may not disclose its insurance premium price.

The Library continued to be represented at the Insurance and Risk Management Corporate Insurance Forum of cultural agencies, which holds regular meetings with Comcover to discuss insurance issues.

Social Justice and Equity

The Library serves a culturally and socially diverse community and aims to make its collection accessible to all. The Library’s collection includes material in over 300 languages. Its programs and services are developed with an emphasis on public accessibility and adhere to the principles outlined in the Australian Government’s Charter of Public Service in a Culturally Diverse Community. The Library is conscientiously implementing the charter and seeks to provide all Australians with the opportunity to access documentary resources of national significance. In particular, during 2011–12 the Library:

  • provided an introductory program to 75 international students of non-English-speaking backgrounds
  • provided exhibition and education tours for adults and young people with special needs, including Alzheimer’s Australia, Canberra College Year 11 Special Needs Unit and senior citizens groups
  • continued an ongoing customer service training program for front-of-house staff, including mental health awareness
  • supported community projects, including the National Year of Reading, National Reconciliation Week, the Indigenous Literacy Project, National Simultaneous Storytime, Children’s Book Week, Get Reading! and Libraries and Information Week
  • supported the development of youth arts activities through events and education programs
  • offered a range of assistive technologies in the reading rooms to help people with sight, hearing or mobility impairments to access the collection and use the full range of services
  • commissioned Vision Australia to undertake an accessibility audit of the Trove interface; redeveloped the interface to ensure that sight-impaired users are able to fully engage with this service
  • upgraded equipment to support visitors with physical disabilities, including the installation of handrails in the Theatre, the upgrade of wheelchairs and the installation of hearing loops in Library venues
  • hosted a tour for organisations that represent Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants, as part of the events marking the second anniversary of the National Apology 
  • developed four short animated online videos about Library services to support user autonomy and to appeal to visual learners 
  • continued to offer small group instructional sessions on topics such as effective web searching and Trove for beginners
  • provided gratis copies of historical photographs to support Indigenous communities celebrating the 45th anniversary of the Gurindji people’s Wave Hill Walk-off and the 40th anniversary of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy
  • enhanced access to 1,200 photographs relating to Indigenous country and community, with assistance from Pitjantjatjara, Larrakia, Gurindji and Arnhem Land communities, to improve captions describing people, places and activities, including names of language and clan groups
  • continued to digitise photographic material for inclusion in the Pitjantjatjara Council’s Ara Irititja database
  • continued the project to document contemporary Indigenous dance through oral history interviews with first wave dancers, including Monica Stevens, Michael Lesley and Stephen Page, and with other Indigenous people, such as Professor Larissa Behrendt, referendum activist Uncle Ray Peckham and Gunbalanya artist Jimmy Namarnyilk
  • delivered 1,100 oral history interviews as online audio, including ten interviews with ‘Stalin’s Poles’ (Polish-Australians who were refugees in Stalinist Russia), 65 interviews with Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants and six interviews with Indigenous Australians about the effect of the Apology to the Stolen Generations. 

Service Charter

The Library’s Service Charter sets out its commitment to users, the standards of service
that users can expect and the mechanisms for providing feedback or making a complaint. Revised in 2011–12, the Service Charter is available online (nla.gov.au/service-charter) and
as a print publication.

During 2011–12, the Service Charter standards were met as follows:

  • 96.2 per cent of general reference inquiries were answered within standards (target 90 per cent)
  • 93 per cent of collection items were delivered within standards and timeframes (target 90 per cent)
  • the Library’s website was available 24 hours a day for 99.9 per cent of the time (target 99.5 per cent).

The Library welcomes feedback and suggestions for service improvements. Feedback forms are placed throughout the Library and on the website (nla.gov.au/feedback). In 2011–12, 258 formal compliments and 126 formal complaints were received from users, as indicated in Tables 2.1 and 2.2.

Table 2.1: Compliments Received, 2011–12
SubjectNumberNature

Information and
online services
to individuals

220

  • quality, professionalism, responsiveness and dedication of staff
  • quality and speed of response to inquiries and delivery of collection material
  • quality of reproduction services
  • quality of website

Public Programs activities

35

  • quality of tours and support for educational visits
  • quality of events program
  • quality of publications
  • quality of exhibitions

Facilities and support 

   3

  • quality of food services
  • quality of Ground Floor refurbishment 

Total

258

 

 In addition, several hundred informal compliments were received from users of the Library’s Trove, Australian Newspapers and Copies Direct services.

Table 2.2: Complaints Received, 2011–12
SubjectNumberNature

The collection

 14

  • cataloguing information for collection material 
  • collecting of digital format material 
  • online access to collection material

Information and online services to individuals

 46

  • access to e-resources
  • access to research resources
  • delays, misunderstandings and perceived lack of assistance relating to requesting/receiving and discharging material
  • reader registration processing
  • reproduction and inter-library lending fees
  • restricted access to the collection
  • users engaged in noisy behaviour
  • website redesign
  • wireless connectivity problems and slow response times

Public Programs activities

 28

  • content and display of exhibitions

Facilities and support 

 38

  • bag restrictions in reading rooms
  • building works noise and related issues, including reduced access to collection material
  • car-parking availability
  • food services
  • handling of some security incidents
  • space availability in the Main Reading Room during busy periods
  • closure of the reading rooms over the Christmas period

Total

126

 

 The Library provided explanations and/or apologies in response to all complaints and undertook remedial action to address them as appropriate. Complaints relating to car parking were referred to the National Capital Authority as the responsible body.

Consultancy Services

The Library entered into 31 new consultancy contracts during 2011–12, at a total actual expenditure of $741,491 (inclusive of GST). Major new consultancies involved the development of software for the Integrated Library Management System interface, the redesign of the Foyer and an energy review of lighting throughout the main building. Appendix E lists the new consultancies with an individual value of $10,000 or more. In addition, 16 ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the same period, involving total actual expenditure of $592,545.

Advertising and Market Research

Advertising and market research in excess of $11,000 for non-recruitment and non-tender services amounted to $72,000 (inclusive of GST), contracted to Adcorp Australia Ltd for newspaper advertising promoting the Library.

Annual Report - Corporate Management

Corporate management activities within the Library aim to maximise service to clients through the realisation of the full potential of staff and other available resources. In 2011–12, activities were focused on the development of requisite people skills, effective management supported by a range of tools and a safe, healthy and sustainable working environment. A major focus has been the main building, which is required to meet access and storage demands associated with a large and diverse national collection and public facility. Through participation in the Corporate Management Forum, the Library also played a part in corporate management across other collecting and portfolio agencies, displaying a supportive, collaborative and cooperative working style to other organisations.

People Management

Last financial year, it was planned that a new Enterprise Agreement (EA) would be in place by mid-2011. A ‘No‘ vote from staff on a draft EA meant that negotiations continued for some additional months. By the end of 2011, the Library had secured an EA that was strongly endorsed by staff and formally approved. The new EA has a nominal duration until mid-2014 and includes a Christmas operations and closedown provision (traded off against a slightly longer working day). The Library also implemented some affordable, modest steps to improve the pay relativity of staff and, importantly, undertook some significant projects to enhance the Library’s effectiveness and efficiency, resulting in the payment of a one-off productivity dividend to staff in June 2012.

Workforce Planning

To complement the Library’s strategic directions, a Strategic Workforce Plan is developed triennially. In this reporting period, the three-year plan for 2009–11 concluded and a new plan for 2012–14 was developed.

The Strategic Workforce Plan (2012–14) identifies three priorities aimed at focusing the Library’s decisions and resources on the increasing workforce demand for digital competencies and technological confidence. They are:

  • building responsiveness to change and emerging digital opportunities
  • building internal capability
  • enhancing career and operational sustainability.

The focus in the final year of the former plan had been on finalising the development and use of consistent selection criteria in recruitment processes, improving workforce diversity, implementing an employment brand for the Library and increasing competency training in web technologies.

As in previous years, the Library’s Workforce Planning Committee met quarterly to review and monitor the relevance and effectiveness of the Strategic Workforce Plan and of particular initiatives. The Library’s Council also considers annually a report on workforce planning and paid particular attention to the progress of the Strategic Workforce Plan, scrutinising the workforce profile data and examining the Library’s employee data in comparison with other Australian Public Service (APS) agencies.

The comparative APS data arises from Library staff who participated in the annual APS Commission State of the Service employee survey. Overall, the results reflected a positive work environment. The results are also monitored by the Workforce Planning Committee and used to inform decisions about Library staffing matters. This year, it was noted that staff showed a high level of job satisfaction, satisfaction with Library management and a strong sense of pride in working at the Library.

Staff Engagement

The Library’s Consultative Committee continues to play an important role, as highlighted during the EA negotiations. The committee monitored the EA’s option to pay a productivity payment to staff upon substantial completion of some strategic positioning projects. Other major issues that the committee considered included:

  • energy and environment management
  • parking arrangements in the Parliamentary Zone
  • a review of IT client support services
  • prevention strategies for bullying and harassment
  • monitoring the number of Individual Flexibility Arrangements, whereby individual members of staff have varying employment conditions relating to remuneration, leave and hours of attendance.

Remuneration

In accordance with the Australian Government’s regime for Principal Executive Officers, the Council determines the Director-General’s remuneration. At 30 June 2012, terms and conditions of employment, such as non-salary benefits including access to motor vehicles and mobile phones for senior executive service (SES) staff, continued under common law contract.

At 30 June 2012, ten non-SES staff had enhanced benefits through Individual Flexibility Arrangements.

Table 2.3 shows the salary ranges for classifications below SES level and the number of employees at each level.

Table 2.3: Salary Ranges below SES Level and Number of Employees, 30 June 2012
ClassificationSalary range ($)Number of employees

EL2

112,508–137,785

26

 

EL 1

91,316–114,972

70

 

APS 6

72,861–91,281

85

 

APS 5

64,555–68,813

81

 

APS 4

58,012–62,639

89

 

Graduate

52,816–62,639

1

 

APS 3

52,816–57,047

75

 

APS 2

45,612–51,714

53

 

APS 1

39,688–43,865

0

 

Cadet

13,572–39,688

1

 

 

As in previous years, all ongoing and long-term non-ongoing staff were required to participate in the Library’s Performance Management Framework, with pay-point progression subject to achieving a satisfactory performance rating.

Fraud Risk Assessment and Control

The Library is committed to the prevention of fraud and takes all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud in the workplace.

The Library is required to examine and update its Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan every two years: this review was completed in 2011–12. In accordance with the Library’s Fraud Management Policy, staff must be aware of their responsibilities in relation to fraud against the Commonwealth. Fraud awareness training is required to be undertaken by all Library staff and, during 2011–12, training sessions were made available to new staff and to staff who had not attended such training in the past four years.

Fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures are in place which, along with the Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan, meet the Library’s needs and comply with Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

Ethical Standards

The Library promotes and endorses the ethical behaviour of its employees by informing staff of their responsibilities and reinforcing compliance with APS Values and Code of Conduct. This is undertaken through:

  • references in the EA
  • the mandatory completion by all new employees of an online induction program, which includes an APS Values and Code of Conduct module
  • regular review and feedback under the Library’s Performance Management Framework
  • mandatory participation in fraud and ethics awareness training
  • participation in and promotion of the APS Commission’s Ethics Advisory Service
  • supporting policy and procedures, such as the whistleblowing and fraud awareness policies
  • establishing clearly identified channels and support networks for employees to raise matters of concern.

In addition to the usual reinforcement activities, in 2011–12 the Library offered the workshop, ‘Governance for Senior Leaders’. The Library also invited Annwyn Godwin, Merit Protection Commissioner, to deliver a staff presentation as part of the ‘Focus on Leadership’ seminar series.

Disability Strategy

The Library remains committed to the principles of the National Disability Strategy and continues to focus on improving access for people with disabilities to employment, programs, services and facilities.

To integrate disability access issues into existing strategic and business planning processes, the Library has developed a Disability Framework. The key elements of the framework include:

  • providing access to information and services
  • providing access to employment
  • purchasing accessible services
  • recognising people with disabilities as consumers of services
  • consulting people with disabilities about their needs.

These elements provide the platform for continuing developments in reader and visitor services, collections management and building and security services.

In 2011–12, the Library advanced the Disability Framework by developing three sub-plans that focus on employment, procurement and services. Each sub-plan contains strategies and actions that support the Library’s objective of improving access for people with disabilities to employment, programs, services and facilities. The sub-plans will also be used for future reporting.

Workplace Diversity

During the reporting period, the Library has taken steps to improve workforce participation in the specific diversity sectors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and people with disabilities. A working group has been established to identify and examine initiatives related to the employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. The Library also participated in the APS Commission’s Pathways program, which has resulted in a modest increase in the number of staff from Indigenous backgrounds.

A campaign to encourage disclosure of a known disability and the identification of workplace assistance was also undertaken. The campaign resulted in a measurable increase in the Library’s workforce participation rate. An element of this initiative was to encourage staff to seek the Library’s assistance, with reasonable adjustment, contributing to the organisation being a respectful and inclusive workplace.

The Library continued to promote the Mature Age Staff Strategy and encouraged retirement planning and transition-to-retirement strategies as valid choices for staff. Presentations on how to discuss retirement options were undertaken with senior leader groups and an invitation for all staff to consider their transition to retirement options was circulated.

As at 30 June 2012, 71 per cent of staff were female and 24 per cent identified as being from a culturally and linguistically diverse background.

Work Health and Safety

This year saw the concentrated efforts of Council and CMG to fulfill the Library’s obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 and related regulations. In planning for the anticipated new laws, the Library established a Work Health and Safety (WHS) Action Plan based on a legislative compliance review undertaken in May 2011. The plan was used to develop and implement a WHS Management System for the Library. In May 2012, a desktop review by a WHS specialist measured and tested the new WHS Management System. A revised WHS Action Plan for 2012–13 is being developed.

In order to gauge performance against the WHS Management System, the Library reports to Council on a bi-monthly basis and provides a comprehensive annual report at the October meeting.

CMG was briefed on the new WHS legislation and its due-diligence obligations. A comprehensive report was subsequently provided to Council and the Audit Committee. Staff were provided with the opportunity to attend training in relation to their roles and responsibilities under the new WHS legislation. A comprehensive review of WHS policies was undertaken as a necessary component to establish the WHS Management System within the Library, with a particular focus on risk management, confined space, hazardous substances, plant, contractors and first aid. This resulted in the development of policies and procedures for each of these elements for the Library.

The Library’s online system for reporting hazards was enhanced to include incident reporting. The arrangement provides an efficient and effective workflow to meet Comcare’s reporting requirements and to report data and trends to Council, CMG and the WHS Committee. Material Safety Data Sheet software was also implemented to enhance the assessment and control of risks associated with hazardous substances and dangerous goods. The Library’s WHS risk-management processes were revised in response to the extension of the legislative definition of ‘workers’ to include volunteers, contractors and work experience students. An online WHS induction program was introduced. New terms of reference were also introduced for the quarterly meetings of the WHS and First Aid committees.

Training courses that were offered included:

  • manual handling
  • dangerous goods and hazardous substances
  • peer support
  • mental-health first aid
  • building resilience
  • contractor safety for managers.

The offer of in-house influenza vaccination was taken up by 150 staff and 120 staff elected to participate in a health assessment.

The Library continued to offer staff and their families confidential counselling through the Employee Assistance Program. Regular presentations were offered on issues, including finding the right balance in life, retirement, stress management and resilience, to complement and promote this program.

Work Health and Safety Statistics

Table 2.4: Reporting Requirements under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, which Took Effect January 2012, and under the Superseded Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991, 30 June 2012

Section 38 occurrences

Notification and reporting of notifiable incidents

There were two notifications

 

Section 198 directions

Power to direct that workplace etc. not be disturbed

No directions were issued

 

Section 95 notices

Provisional improvement notices

No notices were issued

 

Section 160 investigations

Investigations addressing
non-compliance and
possible breaches

There were no investigations

 

Section 195 notices

Power to issue prohibition notices

No notices were issued

 

Section 191 notices 

Power to issue improvement notices

No notices were issued

 

 Note: The sections of the Act referred to in this table relate to the Work Health and Safety Act 2011

During 2011–12, there were no injuries or illnesses that resulted in a claim for workers compensation. This continues the decreasing premium trend evident in 2010–11 and reflected in the declining premium rates as set out in Table 2.5.

Table 2.5: Premiums for Injuries Suffered, 2009–13 (as a percentage of wages and salaries)
Premium rates2009–102010–112011–122012–13

Latest premium rates for the Library*

1.12

0.71

0.53

0.41

Premium rates for all agencies combined (for comparison) 

1.25

1.20

1.41

1.77

Library premium rates as a percentage of all agencies

89.60

59.17

37.58

23.16

 * As amended retrospectively by Comcare

Asset Management

Collection Asset

The collection is the Library’s major asset, on which many of its services are based. The total value of the collection is $1.516 billion.

Plant and Equipment, and Software

The Asset Management Committee oversees the Library’s strategic asset management plan and coordinates operational asset acquisition programs. It also develops and monitors a four-year forward asset acquisition program for strategic planning purposes and an asset disposal program for items reaching the end of their working life. Major asset acquisitions in 2011–12 included the purchase of IT equipment and infrastructure, shelving and equipment and showcases for the Treasures Gallery.

The total value of plant and equipment at 30 June 2012 was $13.289 million.

The total value of software at 30 June 2012 was $4.102 million.

Land and Buildings

The total value of the Library’s land and buildings has been assessed at $201.945 million, including the main building in Parkes and the repository in Hume. The strategic direction for
the management of the Library’s facilities is guided by the Building Works Coordinating Committee. A 15-year Strategic Management Plan is used to set directions for building works, including an annual maintenance plan and a five-year capital works program, which are reviewed each year by Council.

A Strategic Building Master Plan ensures that building works are consistent with the long-term strategic direction of the Library and underpins Library facility planning and budgeting. The plan was reviewed this year to ensure it adequately reflects the Library’s future strategic directions.

In 2011–12, a number of significant capital expenditure building projects were undertaken, including:

  • commisioning of plant and finalisation works for the Treasures and Exhibition galleries and Main Reading Room refurbishment
  • refurbishment of the Library Bookshop
  • continuation of the Fire and Mechanical Services upgrade project, which commenced in late 2009, with anticipated completion in mid-2013, in response to a review of fire services requirements; key components undertaken during the year included the installation of new mechanical services plant on the lower levels and the pressurisation of fire corridors to create safe and smoke-free exit paths 
  • refurbishment of the Library’s five passenger lifts; elements of the existing lifts were over 
  • 40 years old and required a complete overhaul to ensure continued reliability
  • completion of the initial stage of the Foyer refurbishment, including Building Code compliance works to the marble stairs and restoration of the original marble floor
  • refurbishment of Level 1 office accommodation (approximately 1,750 sqm), providing a modern and flexible office environment.

A number of other capital works projects were finalised, including:

  • refurbishment of the Manuscripts Reading Room, Conference Room and several collection storage areas
  • installation of hearing loops in the Ferguson and Conference rooms
  • installation of a heavy duty hoist in the Level 5 plant room
  • replacement of the Executive Suite air conditioning plant
  • installation of digital CCTV cameras in several previously unmonitored areas.

Heritage Management Strategy

The Library is listed on the Commonwealth Heritage List (2004) and is committed to the conservation of the Commonwealth heritage values of the main building. This includes undertaking consultation with recognised heritage specialists prior to undertaking building works in heritage-sensitive areas. In 2011–12, successful projects following consultation included the redesign of the Bookshop and the construction of the Treasures and Exhibition galleries and the new entrance to the Main Reading Room.

A review of the Library’s heritage furniture was undertaken, which provided an updated Heritage Furniture Register. The resulting report provides the Library with recommendations for the future use and management of the heritage furniture collection throughout the main building. Throughout the year, 24 items of heritage furniture were restored by approved restoration contractors.

In compliance with the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, the Library’s Conservation Management Plan has been reviewed and will undergo a public consultation process in preparation for submission in the second half of 2012 to the Minister for Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities.

The Library’s Heritage Strategy was reviewed and amended this year, with a report on performance against the strategy to be submitted to the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities next financial year.

Security and Business Continuity

The Library’s Emergency Planning Committee oversees all aspects of protective security and business continuity planning. It comprises senior staff with responsibility for corporate communications and the security of staff, the collection, buildings and other assets.

During 2011–12, business continuity policies and procedures were reviewed to ensure their compliance with Australian Standard AS 3745-2010: Planning for Emergencies in Facilities.
The Library has almost completed an update of security procedures for the additional requirements of the recent Commonwealth Protective Security Policy Framework.

Energy Consumption and Environmental Management

The Library is committed to improving its environmental performance across all areas of its operations. To do so, it has devised an Environmental Policy and an Environmental Action
Plan (EAP), which determines the Library’s targets for environmental performance. The Environmental Management System helps to set, implement and review these environmental objectives and targets.

In August 2011, to further enhance performance and awareness, the Environment Management Committee was established to coordinate and achieve the Library’s sustainability aims and targets. The committee meets quarterly to discuss, propose and implement a wide range of environmental initiatives across the Library, as well as to track performance against the EAP. Reports on environmental targets and performance are provided annually to Council.

The Library also aims to incorporate ecologically sustainable development principles into major projects. For example, the office refurbishment on Level 1 incorporated new workstations purchased from a company that aims to reuse, recycle or resell its products at end of life. Additionally, old carpet removed from the site was recycled and new carpets were purchased from a company that offers a take-back scheme at end of life.

In 2011–12, the Library has undertaken a number of initiatives which are expected to result in better waste management, energy savings and a reduction in the carbon footprint, including:

  • completion of an audit of current waste and recycling practices that identified opportunities for improvement, including introducing organic recycling and additional recycling streams to reduce waste to landfill
  • working towards accreditation with the ACTSmart Office program, a best-practice program on managing waste for organisations in the ACT
  • completion of an audit of light fittings and control systems within the main building, which identified opportunities to reduce energy usage by up to 25 per cent; tenders have been called to undertake the refurbishment of three test areas in the first quarter of 2012–13
  • commencement in May 2011 of a trial of broadening the temperature controls of collection storage areas at the Hume repository, with the aim of conserving energy usage and maintaining appropriate storage conditions
  • installation of flow restrictors on kitchen and bathroom taps.

In comparison to the previous year (May 2010 to May 2011), the Library has reduced gas consumption by 15 per cent to 4,805,293 MJ per annum and electricity consumption by two per cent to 6,720,587 kWh per annum. The Library’s water consumption has increased by seven per cent to 15,660 kL per annum. The increase is believed to relate to the high level of building works undertaken during the period. 

Recycling at the Library has also increased significantly. Cardboard recycling has increased by seven per cent to 22,020 kg and paper recycling has increased by six per cent to 38,405 kg per annum. Significantly, commingle recycling has increased by 55 per cent to 10,580 kg per annum, as a result of incorporating more waste into the commingle stream. Organic recycling commenced at the end of the year, with 267 kg being recycled during the trial period.

Purchasing

The Library maintained a focus on cost-effective contract management and procurement practices that are consistent with the Commonwealth Procurement Guidelines and supplemented by the Library’s guidelines. The Library utilised the Australian National Audit Office’s Better Practice Guide: Developing and Managing Contracts (February 2012) to assess and update its processes and for guidance. Procurement and contract templates were reviewed to ensure they continue to meet government good practice and are simple and straightforward to use. The revised templates took particular heed of the new WHS legislative responsibilities.

The major procurement activity undertaken by the Library during the year related to the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project and involved a two-stage approach: firstly, releasing an open Request for Proposal to inform the marketplace about the nature and scope of the Library’s requirements, to encourage innovative solutions, to clarify the Library’s expectations and to eliminate inappropriate bids; and secondly, providing a select Request for Tender to the bidders shortlisted from the first stage. The procurement drew interest from both domestic and international suppliers. 

Other large purchasing activities involved the acquisition of motorised mobile shelving units, the refurbishment of a staffing area on Level 1 and the tender for cleaning, recycling and labour. The Library did not enter into contracts of $100,000 or more that did not provide for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises.

Grants

In 2011–12, the Library operated nine grant programs.

Community Heritage Grants

The Library awarded 82 grants of up to $15,000 each to assist community organisations to preserve and manage nationally significant cultural heritage collections. Financial support and assistance for this grants program were received from the Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport Office for the Arts, the National Archives of Australia, the National Film and Sound Archive and the National Museum of Australia.

Harold White Fellowships

The Library funded seven fellowships for established writers and researchers to spend up to six months at the Library researching collection material in their areas ofexpertise. Fellowships were awarded to Associate Professor Chi-Kong Lai, Professor Jim Davidson, Dr Lyn Gallacher, Dr Luke Keogh, Dr Anthony Lawrence, Professor Satendra Nandan and Dr Tim Sherratt. Honorary Fellowships were awarded to Dr Andrew Selth, Dr Mary Eagle and Professor Craig Reynolds.

Japan Fellowships

Awarded to established scholars and writers to spend up to six months at the Library researching Japanese collection material, the fellowships are funded through the Harold S. Williams Trust. One fellowship was awarded to Dr Gary Hickey.

Japan Study Grants

Funded through the Harold S. Williams Trust, these grants support scholars in Japanese studies who live outside Canberra to undertake research in the Library’s Japanese and western languages collections for up to four weeks. Grants were awarded to Ms Kumiko Kawashima, Dr Chiaki Ajioka and Dr Miyume Tanji.

National Folk Fellowship

With assistance from the National Folk Festival, the Library funded a four-week residency for Ms Emma Nixon and Mr Chris Stone to research original source material and to prepare a festival performance.

Norman McCann Summer Scholarships

Funded by Mrs Pat McCann, the Library awarded three scholarships of six weeks to young Australian postgraduate students Ms Michelle De Stefani, Ms Alexandra Dellios and Mr Jon Piccini to undertake research on topics in Australian history or literature. Due to the generosity of an anonymous donor, the Library was able to offer an additional scholarship, which was awarded to Ms Fiona Scotney.

Seymour Summer Scholarship

Funded by Dr John and Mrs Heather Seymour, this scholarship of six weeks supports research, preferably in biography, by a young Australian postgraduate student. The scholarship was awarded to Mr Robert O’Shea.

Kenneth Binns Travelling Fellowship

Funded by Mrs Alison Sanchez to commemorate her father, Kenneth Binns, Chief Librarian of the Commonwealth National Library from 1928 to 1947, the fellowship supports travel for professional development by Library staff in the early stages of their career. The 2012 fellowship was awarded to Ms Erika Mordek.

Friends of the National Library Travelling Fellowship

Funded by the Friends of the National Library of Australia, the fellowship provides a significant professional development opportunity for a Library staff member. The 2012 fellowship was awarded to Ms Anne Xu.

Cooperation on Corporate Management Issues within the Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport Portfolio

The Corporate Management Forum consists of senior executives with corporate management responsibilities from agencies in the Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport portfolio and a small number of non-profit agencies. The forum considers issues in the areas of human resource management, financial management, procurement, IT and facilities management, with a view to achieving economies of scale, sharing experience and encouraging best practice.

The forum met four times during 2011–12. The matters considered by the forum included:

  • the Commonwealth financial accountability review
  • new WHS requirements
  • capital planning and funding
  • collection storage
  • energy management
  • risk management and insurance
  • enterprise agreements
  • staff training
  • key performance indicators for Australian Government arts and culture agencies
  • shared services.

Annual Report - Information Technology

Information technology (IT) is used by the Library to facilitate and support the development of new online services and to ensure that these services are cost-effective, reliable and responsive. A focus of recent years has been on developing software to support collections held in Australian libraries and other collecting institutions through the Library’s discovery and access service, Trove. The Library has also commenced a major project to replace systems used to build, preserve and deliver its digital collections. The Library uses IT to support its website and other web-publishing activities. The required IT and communication infrastructure is provided in-house.

Innovation

In 2011–12, the Library released an application programming interface (API) for Trove. The API provides an efficient mechanism for others to reuse the almost 300 million information resources for research and analysis and to build new online services. The Library also completed a project, funded by the Australian National Data Service, to extend Trove’s infrastructure, thereby improving the discovery of researchers and research organisations and the data they produce and manage. In 2011, The Australian Women’s Weekly spotlight site was released. The site is a trial interface for searching and browsing The Australian Women’s Weekly in Trove.

The Library also undertook a range of IT development activities aimed at improving its services and operations. These included changes to Copies Direct, which introduced a shopping-cart facility for users ordering copies of collection items, and an updated service providing online access to time-coded oral history transcripts, audio and summaries.

During 2011–12, social networking and mobile computing were areas of active innovation at the Library, including:

  • Joining Flickr Commons, an online space where cultural institutions from around the world can post images from their collections alongside over six billion photographs submitted by the public. The Library has subsequently seen a vast increase in use of these images compared to when they were only accessible through our website. We have also received valuable information about our images through tags and identification of places and people, sometimes verified using our digitised newspapers. 
  • Developing a Mobile Strategy to guide the introduction of mobile services.
  • Releasing mobile catalogue apps for both Apple and Android smartphones. During the first weekend after release, the iPhone catalogue app was ranked as the number one educational app in the Apple appstore.
  • Increased use of social networking blogs to engage with the wider community, including Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu BerlinPage Turners and Paddy’s Kitchen.

Infrastructure and Services

In 2011–12, the Library’s digital collection increased in size by approximately 24 per cent and has now exceeded 1.5 petabytes of storage (see Figure 2.3). The major contributor to storage growth was the digitisation of Australian newspapers (see Figure 2.4). Australian newspapers (65 per cent) dominate the storage requirements, followed by archived web pages (19 per cent) and oral history recordings (7 per cent). 

Figure 2.3: Growth in Digital Collection Storage, January 2003 to June 2012

Figure 2.3: Growth in Digital Collection Storage, January 2003 to June
        2012

Figure 2.3: Growth in Digital Collection Storage, January 2003 to June 2012 Data in Table Format
Month/YearTerabytes
Jan 0313
Jun 0316
Jan 0423
Jun 0432
Jan 0545
Jun 0551
Jan 0671
Jun 0677
Jan 07116
Jun 07122
Jan 08230
Jun 08305
Jan 09503
Jun 09572
Jan 10759
Jun 10917
Jan 111184
Jun 111266
Jan 121475
Jun 121566

Figure 2.4: Digital Collection Storage by Material, 30 June 2012

Figure 2.4: Digital Collection Storage by Material, 30 June 2012

Figure 2.4: Digital Collection Storage by Material, 30 June 2012 Data in Table Format
MaterialPercent (%)
Maps1%
Sheet Music1%
Other2%
Pictures2%
Manuscripts3%
Oral history7%
Web archive19%
Australian newspapers65%

The Library also supports substantial infrastructure to enable the discovery of, and access to, its own and other collections. Figure 2.5 shows the growth in use of the Library’s webservices since 2000. Driven by the use of digitised Australian newspapers, Trove continues to experience strong growth in web activity.

Figure 2.5: Use of Web Services, 2000–11

Figure 2.5: Use of Web Services, 2000–11

Figure 2.5: Use of Web Services, 2000–11 Data in Table Format
WebserverRequests
Year200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011
Trove         310786118432481402584501330
Australian Newspapers        12419924753068053492511164152829364
Catalogue        21380115753068053492511164152829364
Australian Research        4669967837279335336907541796652
NLA Wiki      13800671209476510307014570262637406633850650
Libraries Australia    140918335227438156141581195239839213358983264255337246316177290817167
Digital Objects  5512896118133812198499931656145527598456921662088580428169505931178137380222568807
Music Australia  1663678459639665851221087914873097272953021165818131465406629803493584738262 
Picture Australia512230411899241198850362954302148973346485209759395273412894131681320018599632106006257694532898 
PANDORA  26059087274878246076409754577585616042202901206833306760314740454337879541724615 
Library website2904496879275403127625128177199968215584053224246870269718229281328169295036959380569508438628282559229937 

In accordance with the Australian Government’s Web Accessibility National Transition Strategy, Trove underwent an accessibility audit by Vision Australia. Following the successful completion of this work, Trove meets Level AA Success Criteria of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, thereby allowing more users to fully engage and participate with the service.

Reliable IT infrastructure is essential to the Library’s digital storage and access services. Table 2.6 shows the year’s average availability of nine key service areas. The target availability of 99.5 per cent was met for all services, except Libraries Australia, which experienced outages due to performance issues with the software component licensed by the Library and also because of storage system problems. A project to replace the software module has commenced and the storage system will be replaced in 2012.

Table 2.6: Availability of Nine Key Service Areas, 2011–12
ServiceAvailability (%)

Network

99.7

 

File and print

99.9

 

Email

99.9

 

Website

99.9

 

ILMS

99.6

 

Digital Library

99.5

 

Corporate Systems

100.0

 

Document Supply

99.8

 

Libraries Australia

99.3

 

Trove

99.5

 

Under its asset management program, the Library continued to replace and upgrade IT infrastructure.

Important developments in the reporting period included:

  • completion of the software procurement phase of the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project
  • provision of additional storage capacity to support the growth of the Library’s digital collection and to enable a copy to be held on spinning disk, in keeping with efficient collection management and preservation processes
  • decommissioning of Picture Australia and Music Australia, as part of the transition to Trove
  • decommissioning of the general applications Solaris server, in response to the Library’s continuing transition to Redhat Unix as the preferred web-application delivery platform, which changed how a number of smaller legacy web-based services were delivered
  • procurement and configuration of equipment for an offsite Disaster Recovery Site to improve IT business continuity (email and web services) in the case of localised outages.

An energy sustainability review of the Library’s computer room identified a number of energy reduction measures that can be implemented in subsequent years.

Annual Report - Report of Operations

Annual Report - Outcome and Strategies

Performance reporting in this chapter is based on the Library’s outcome and program structure set out in the Portfolio Budget Statement 2011–12. The Library has one outcome.

Enhanced learning, knowledge creation, enjoyment and understanding of Australian life and society by providing access to a national collection of library material.

In 2011–12, the Library achieved this outcome through three strategies:

  • collecting and preserving Australia’s documentary heritage
  • providing access to the Library’s collection
  • collaborating nationally and internationally.

Annual Report - Strategy One: Collecting and Preserving

Operating Outcome

During 2011–12, income, including revenue from government, amounted to $66.616 million and expenses were $76.440 million, resulting in a deficit of $9.824 million. From an income-statement perspective, the Library does not receive appropriation funding for depreciation of the national collection (totalling $12.024 million), which forms part of operating expenses. Government funding for the purchase of collection material is provided through an equity injection totalling $9.779 million.

Income

The total income of $66.616 million for 2011–12 was $3.761 million above budget and compares to total actual income of $64.418 million for 2010–11. Figure 1.1 shows a comparison of income across items against budget for 2011–12 and 2010–11.

Figure 1.1: Income, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Figure 1.1: Income, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

Figure 1.1: Income, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format

 Actual 2011–12Budget 2011–12Actual 2010–11
Revenue from government48.98948.98949.105
Sales of goods and services8.9078.0387.780
Interest2.9882.2803.333
All other income5.7323.5484.200
Total66.61662.85564.418

The major variations between financial years relate to increases in the sales of goods and services ($1.127 million), largely due to an increase in revenue received from digitising other library collections, increased sales through the Bookshop and sponsorship revenue associated with the Library’s exhibition program; increases in other revenue ($1.613 million), largely due to increased grant and donation revenue; and reductions in interest revenue ($0.345 million) and revenue from government ($0.116 million). The decline in interest revenue is primarily the result of reduced deposit rates received during 2011–12.

Expenses

The total expenses of $76.440 million for 2011–12 were $0.216 million above budget and $4.458 million more than 2010–11. Figure 1.2 shows a comparison of expenditure across items and against budget for 2011–12 and 2010–11.

Figure 1.2: Expenses, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Figure 1.2: Expenses, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

Figure 1.2: Expenses, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format

 Actual 2011–12Budget 2011–12Actual 2010–11
Employees39.18237.01636.016
Suppliers17.10017.40116.214
Depreciation and amortisation19.39221.21419.029
Other0.7660.5930.723
Total76.44076.22471.982

Employee expenses were $3.166 million more than 2010–11. This is the result of a combination of factors, including a net increase in leave expenses ($1.842 million), of which $1.254 million is due to the movements in the long-term bond rate during 2011–12, which has the effect of increasing the value of the liability; reduced capitalisation of staff time ($0.401 million) associated with the production of internally developed software and with the digitising of collection material, which has the effect of increasing salary expenditure; and base salary increases and a small productivity payment provided to staff under the Library’s Enterprise Agreement and partially offset by a small reduction in staff numbers (8.9 average staffing level).

Supplier expenses were higher ($0.886 million) than 2010–11, largely due to increased cost of goods sold ($0.193 million), primarily as a result of increased sales through the Library’s Bookshop, and increased promotional expenses ($0.585 million), largely associated with the opening of the Library’s Treasures Gallery and the exhibition, Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin. Much of the additional expenditure associated with the exhibition was funded by the receipt of sponsorship revenue.

Depreciation and amortisation expenses were $0.363 million higher than 2010–11. The primary reason for the variation is increased depreciation of plant and equipment ($0.242 million),
largely the result of the replacement of existing assets.

Equity

In 2011–12, the Library’s total equity increased by $86.766 million to $1,776.531 million. The net increase is a result of an equity injection for collection acquisitions ($9.779 million), a net revaluation increment ($86.811 million) following the revaluation of the Library’s collection, land and buildings, and the net operating result ($9.824 million) for 2011–12.

Total Assets

Figure 1.3 shows that the total value of the Library’s assets increased by $86.339 million to $1,793.712 million in 2011–12.

Figure 1.3: Total Assets, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Figure 1.3: Total Assets, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

Figure 1.3: Total Assets, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format

 Actual 30 June 2012Actual 30 June 2011
Financial assets54.366m56.194m
Inventories and other3.840m3.893m
Intangibles—software4.102m4.663m
The National Collection1,516.170m1,435.175m
Plant and equipment13.289m12.937m
Land and buildings201.945m194.511m
Total1,793.712m1,707.373m

The increase in non-financial assets ($88.167 million) is largely the result of the revaluation of the Library’s collections, land and buildings (a net increment of $86.811 million) and the net difference between current-year assets acquisitions, disposals and current-year depreciation expenses ($1.409 million). In addition, there was an increase in the value of inventories ($0.089 million) and a reduction in the value of prepaid supplier expenses ($0.142 million). The decrease in financial assets ($1.828 million) relates primarily to a reduction in receivables ($0.676 million), a reduction in cash at bank ($0.781 million) and a reduction in investments ($0.579 million).

Total Liabilities

As Figure 1.4 shows, the Library’s total liabilities reduced by $0.427 million from last financial year to $17.181 million.

Figure 1.4: Total Liabilities, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Figure 1.4: Total Liabilities, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

Figure 1.4: Total Liabilities, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format

 Actual 30 June 2012Actual 30 June 2011
Employee provisions12.279m11.001m
Payable4.902m6.607m
Total17.181m17.608m

The changes in liabilities relate to a reduction in supplier payables ($1.971 million) and increases in grants payable ($0.007 million), employee provisions ($1.278 million) and other payables ($0.259 million).

Cash Flow 

In 2011–12 there was a reduction in the Library’s cash balance, which decreased by $0.781 million to $5.443 million as at 30 June 2012. Figure 1.5 shows a comparison of cash flow items for 2011–12 and 2010–11.

Figure 1.5: Net Cash Flow, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Figure 1.5: Net Cash Flow, 2011–12 and 2010–11

Figure 1.5: Net Cash Flow, 2011–12 and 2010–11 Data in Table Format

 Actual 30 June 2012Actual 30 June 2011
Net operating8.259m10.625m
Net investing-18.819m-18.280m
Net financing9.779m9.743m
Total-0.781m2.088m

The decrease in net cash from operating activities ($2.366 million) reflects the comments under ‘Income’ and ‘Expenses’. The increase in net cash used by investing activities ($0.539 million) primarily reflects the net movement of funds from investments to cash at bank between years ($4.391 million), a decrease in the investment in property, plant and equipment and intangibles ($4.452 million) and a decrease in proceeds from the sales of property, plant and equipment as a consequence of the sale in 2010–11 of an apartment gifted to the Library ($0.600 million). The decrease in the investment in property, plant and equipment and intangibles is largely the result of increased building expenditure during 2010–11 as a result of the construction of the new Treasures Gallery. There was a minor increase in net cash from financing activities between financial years ($0.036 million), as a result of the Library’s equity injection provided by government to fund collection acquisitions being slightly increased.

Annual Report - Strategy Two: Providing Access

The Library provides access to its collection to all Australians through services to users in the main building and nationally through online information services. The Library provides reference and lending services to both onsite users and to those outside Canberra, via online services and the digitisation of selected resources from the Australian Collection. The Library also delivers a diverse annual program of exhibitions and events.

In 2011–12, the Library will:

  • complete construction of a Treasures Gallery, which will enable the Library to permanently display its iconic, rare and important collection items to the public
  • commence work on the integration of the Main and Newspapers and Microforms reading rooms
  • implement improved systems and workflows to enhance the supply of copies of collection material to users.

Major Initiatives

Complete construction of a Treasures Gallery, which will enable the Library to permanently display its iconic, rare and important collection items to the public.

Many of the Library’s greatest treasures, from James Cook’s Endeavour Journal to Edward Koiki Mabo’s papers and the original draft of Waltzing Matilda, are on permanent display in the new Treasures Gallery. A diverse selection from the Library’s overseas collections is also showcased.

The successful opening was a significant moment in the Library’s history and was the culmination of over ten years of work. It would have been impossible without the support of
the Australian Government and the generosity of supporters, who helped the Library to raise over $3 million to fund the building of the gallery.

Commence work on the integration of the Main and Newspapers and Microforms reading rooms.

In June 2011, following completion of renovations in the Main Reading Room associated with the construction of the Treasures Gallery, the next stage of reading room improvements was planned to be the integration of the Newspapers and Microforms Reading Room, moving it from the current location on Lower Ground 1 to the Main Reading Room. After further consideration, it has been decided instead to prioritise integration of special collections reading rooms. As a first stage, in October 2011, the Pictures and Manuscripts reading rooms were integrated into a renovated reading room, providing a single service point on Level 2 for access to these collections. In January 2012, work began on the feasibility of developing an enlarged integrated reading room for access to rare and special collection materials, including manuscripts, pictures, maps, rare books, sheet music, ephemera and oral history recordings. The decision was taken to locate the new reading room on Level 1, in compliance with the provisions of the Strategic Building Master Plan. A design brief for the new reading room has been completed.

Implement improved systems and workflows to enhance the supply of copies of collection material to users.

A major project to redevelop Copies Direct, the online requesting service for clients wishing to order copies of collection material, was undertaken. The redeveloped service is easy to use, has improved functionality, including a shopping-cart facility for multiple item orders, and better security for online payment. The redevelopment has also improved workflow processes for staff. Since the redevelopment, almost 10,000 Copies Direct orders have been placed and the new service has received an overwhelmingly positive response from users.

Issues and Developments

A major project to transfer pre-2010 Australian print collections into separate sequences for monographs and journals was completed, resulting in compaction of collections and more efficient use of available onsite storage space. The project has created enough additional storage space in the main building to defer the requirement for an extension to the Library’s offsite facility in Hume until at least 2015.

A quality assurance review of the Ask a Librarian enquiry service showed strong adherence to the Library’s performance guidelines, with 98 per cent of the responses judged as using ‘excellent or good’ language and tone, 95 per cent providing an ‘excellent or good’ answer, 94 per cent meeting the one-hour time limit for preparing responses and 96 per cent being answered within a week (exceeding the Service Charter guideline of 90 per cent). These results suggest that users benefit from a consistent-quality service delivered from staff answering research and information enquiries in different branches across the Library.

A new inventory management system was implemented in the Bookshop and Sales and Promotion sections. The Library Bookshop refurbishment and upgrade of the online shop has contributed to an increase in sales over the previous year.

The Library published 23 new titles promoting the Library’s collection. The titles are sold through more than 1,650 outlets in Australia and New Zealand and online. The book accompanying the exhibition, Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, was represented in the weekly Nielsen Top 20 sales list for Independent Booksellers on six occasions and the print run of 5,000 sold out. Two previously published titles received national recognition:

  • author Jenny Gall and Joanna Karmel, Senior Editor, Publications, won the Fellowship of Australian Writers’ Barbara Ramsden Award, which acknowledges the combined effort of author and editor for a book of quality writing, for In Bligh’s Hand: Surviving the Mutiny on the Bounty
  • extracts from Australian Backyard Explorer by Peter Macinnis have been selected for use in a Primary English Teaching Association Australia publication that supports primary school educators of English and literacy across the curriculum.

The Library’s Volunteer Program expanded with the opening of the Treasures Gallery and the Exhibition Gallery in late 2011. Volunteers assist the Library by providing daily gallery tours, as well as behind-the-scenes and building-art tours, providing front-of-house assistance on weekends and public holidays and working on a range of other projects.

Volunteers make a significant contribution to improving access to the collection. In 2011–12, for example, a volunteer with specialist aviation experience completed a data spreadsheet of over 70,000 aerial photographs, enabling the information to be accessed through the Library’s catalogue. Through this and other volunteer projects, the Library can now provide catalogue access to over 800,000 Australian, Papuan and Antarctic aerial images, exposing previously hidden collection material and resulting in higher use of the collection. 

Positioning Projects

Some 30 projects aimed at improving access to the collection and streamlining workflows were carried out during the year, with the assistance of one-off project funding. These included:

  • preparing pictures for digitisation
  • creating online lists to aid discovery of some high-profile performing-arts ephemera
  • digitising 140,000 pages of oral history transcripts, which can now be delivered electronically, rather than as photocopies
  • trialing digitisation and delivery of non-English-speaking community newspapers
  • developing system applications and processes to allow staff to undertake maintenance of the Library Management System without the need for IT support
  • converting the Chinese card catalogue entries for access through the online catalogue
  • delivering a standards-based IT project that enables interoperability between the inter-library loans management system and the catalogue and eliminates the need for double-keying records in both systems
  • producing a series of online instructional videos answering frequently asked questions about Library services
  • undertaking a detailed review of the Libraries Australia business environment
  • identifying a suitable platform to record, maintain and interrogate information about over 400 potential contributors to Trove
  • reviewing the file formats used in physical format digital publications in the Library’s collection, with a view to documenting characteristics.

All the projects achieved their aims and enabled important progress in priority areas of activity. 

Cataloguing

The completion of projects to catalogue several large collections improved access for users. Completed projects included the Riley Collection of material about the Australian labour movement from the 1890s to the 1960s, the Symphony Australia Collection of Australian musical works from 1912 to the 1970s and the Marcie Muir Collection of Australian children’s literature. 

As part of the ongoing program to improve workflows and processes that support collection processing and cataloguing, the Library has started to use publisher-generated bibliographic data, instead of recreating this data. Publishers and distributors produce data routinely to manage stock. The data is compliant with ONIX (Online Information eXchange), an international standard for representing and communicating book industry product information in electronic form. A number of Australian publishers have agreed to provide ONIX records for forthcoming publications for use in the Library’s catalogues. The Library will seek to broaden the program to include more publishers, as it offers productivity savings and is an efficient way to collaborate with the publishing sector.

Digitisation

Through the Australian Newspaper Digitisation Program, the Library has digitised over seven million newspaper pages, consisting of almost 70 million articles. This year, the number and range of regional newspaper titles has been greatly expanded to include titles such as The Singleton Argus and The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate (NSW); The Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Tas.); The Darling Downs Gazette and General Advertiser and Charleville Times (Qld); Warrnambool Standard and The Colac Herald (Vic.); Border Watch (SA) and The Daily News (WA). Two hundred and eighty individual newspaper titles have now been digitised and are feely available for all Australians to search online.

The number of organisations that contribute funding towards digitising local newspapers continues to grow. In 2011–12, a consortium of 11 New South Wales public libraries contributed funding, in addition to:

  • Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office
  • State Library of Western Australia
  • State Library of Victoria
  • Western Plains Cultural Centre (Dubbo)
  • Hawkesbury Library Service
  • Ballarat and District Genealogical Society
  • Stonnington History Centre (Melbourne)
  • Gilgandra Shire Council
  • Friends of Battye Library (WA).

A statement of acknowledgment is made available from every related page and article view in Trove.

During 2011–12, the Library undertook a focused project to trial the digitisation of non-English-speaking community newspapers. The following titles were selected:

  • Adelaider Deutsche Zeitung (1851–1862)
  • Süd-Australische Zeitung (1859–1874)
  • Il Giornale Italiano (1932–1940)
  • Meie Kodu (1949–1954), which was generously funded by the Estonian Archives in Australia.

Following a community led online fundraising campaign, on International Women’s Day (8 March 2012), the Library launched digitised issues of The Dawn: A Journal for Australian Women, Australia’s first feminist journal.

Throughout the year, 16,236 items were digitised, drawn from pictures, maps, manuscripts, music and printed material. Significant items included:

  • a selection of early Canberra maps, in anticipation of the Centenary of Canberra
  • a selection of First and Second World War maps
  • 230 Japanese woodblock kuchi-e prints
  • Symphony Australia concert touring schedules and itineraries
  • the Peter Dombrovskis archive of 3,580 photographs of Australian wilderness landscapes
  • a collection of hotel, cruise ship and Christmas menus.

Acquisitions

The Library acquired many interesting and significant materials during the year. A selection of notable acquisitions is listed in Appendix J.

Performance

Table 3.4: Provide Access to the National Collection and Other Documentary Resources—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2011–12
 MeasureTargetAchieved

Deliverables

Physical collection items delivered to users [#]

240,000

210,297

 

Website access—pageviews [#] (millions)

364 

352 

Key performance indicators

Collection access—Service Charter [%]

100.0

100.0

 

National collection delivered [% growth]

0

-16.0

 

Website access—pageviews [% growth]

7.0

4.0

Figure 3.3: Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users

Figure 3.3: Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users

Figure 3.3: Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users Data in Table Format
YearTargetAchieved
2008-2009256,000295,511
2009-2010265,000285,138
2010-2011270,000250,195
2011-2012240,000210,297
2012-2013241,000 
2013-2014242,000 

The target was not met. A matching increase in use of online resources suggests users prefer the immediacy and convenience of digital collections. Increased charges for inter-library loans and document supply also contributed to this decline.

Table 3.5: National Collection Delivered [% growth]
AchievedAchievedTargetTarget

2008–09

2009–10

2009–11

2011–12

 

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

10.1

-3.5

-12.3

-16.0

0

1.0

1.0

1.0

The target was not met. 

Table 3.6: Collection Access—Service Charter [%]
AchievedAchievedTargetTarget

2008–09

2009–10

2009–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

The Service Charter standards for reference enquiries responded to, collection delivery and website availability were achieved.

Figure 3.4: Website Access—Number of Pageviews

Figure 3.4: Website Access—Number of Pageviews

Figure 3.4: Website Access—Number of Pageviews Data in Table Format
YearTargetAchieved
2008-2009102,520,000156,495,200
2009-2010143,000,000279,000,000
2010-2011260,000,000339,039,103
2011-2012364,000,000352,000,000
2012-2013389,000,000 
2013-2014416,000,000 

The target was not met. While the use of the Library’s website has not declined, for the first time the projected annual growth (seven per cent) in access to the Library’s online services through the website was not achieved. The reduced overall growth is a result of a substantial reduction (approximately 40 per cent) in internet search engine referrals to the Library catalogue. The Library continues to see strong growth in the use of Trove (up some 30 per cent) and generally steady growth in other online services. Modest growth of seven per cent has been forecast for the next few years and it should be noted that the Library’s website is heavily used compared to those of other libraries and government departments.

Table 3.7: Website Access—Pageviews [% growth]
AchievedAchievedTargetTarget

2008–09

2009–10

2009–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

63.3

78.1

22.0

4.0

7.0

7.0

7.0

7.0

The target was not met.

Annual Report - Strategy Three: Collaboration

The Library aims to collaborate nationally and internationally to ensure that Australians have access to the information resources they need on a professional and personal level to undertake their research, study and lifelong learning and to understand and appreciate Australia’s history and culture. The Library’s services are designed so that they are accessible to all Australians.

The Library works in partnership with other collecting institutions to improve online services and to develop common standards, sharing expertise and knowledge. In addition, the Library represents the interests of the Australian library sector nationally and internationally.

In 2011–12, the Library will:

  • continue to work collaboratively with National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA) on a series of major projects known as Reimagining Libraries, which aim to transform services offered by the national, state and territory libraries to better meet the needs of Australians for access to library services in the digital age
  • continue a major oral history project, funded by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, to record the story of the Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants
  • improve our national collection discovery service, Trove, and extend Trove to include journal articles and licensed e-resources
  • improve the performance of Libraries Australia, a national resource-sharing service, by redeveloping the search interface
  • participate in and contribute to the work of international library bodies, including the Committee of Principals, the Conference of Directors of National Libraries and the International Federation of Library Associations.

Major Initiatives

Continue to work collaboratively with NSLA on a series of major projects known as Reimagining Libraries, which aim to transform services offered by the national, state and territory libraries to better meet the needs of Australians for access to library services in the digital age.

The Library produced a second edition of Guidelines for Library Staff Assisting Donors to Prepare Their Personal Digital Archives for Transfer to NSLA Libraries. The revised version incorporates valuable feedback from member institutions, assisting libraries to liaise with donors about preparing and managing personal digital archives. The guidelines are a useful starting kit for conversations with potential donors—in 2012 it was the most-downloaded publication from the NSLA website.

In another project, an electronic accessioning costing tool for manuscripts was developed to assist NSLA libraries to cost and better understand each of the tasks which comprise the processing workflow. Staff record the time taken for each task (such as receipt, registration, rehousing and cataloguing) into the spreadsheet, which automatically calculates the cost of the activity according to staff level. Results are providing a more precise understanding of the complexities involved in accessioning and are creating opportunities for potential efficiencies.

The Library also commenced a project to reinvigorate the approach to collecting significant Australian websites for inclusion in PANDORA: Australia’s Web Archive. Over the next few years, the aim will be to implement more sophisticated and flexible software to support more efficient collecting and user-friendly delivery options for presenting search results. As well as continuing to select individual websites and conducting larger-scale collecting by type of publication, such as government websites, a new collaborative approach to selecting important websites on contemporary issues, such as the Australian mining boom, will be pursued and the results presented as curated collections. In March 2012, the Library held a successful workshop attended by representatives from NSLA libraries to discuss the implementation of the revised collecting strategy.

Scoping work commenced on options to allow Trove users to reach copy order services offered by NSLA libraries. This project builds on the Library’s successful redevelopment of its Copies Direct service (and exposure of the Copies Direct option in Trove) and the lightweight approach to e-resource authentication, which allows Australian libraries to add data to their ‘profile’ on Australian Libraries Gateway, affecting what can be viewed and accessed via Trove. 

Continue a major oral history project, funded by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, to record the story
of the Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants.

The interviewing stage of the project is drawing to a close, with 230 interviews commissioned and 172 interviews completed so far. Where interviewees have granted permission, 104 interviews have been made available in full online. The interviews document a diverse range of experiences of being in out-of-home care and of the complexities of the lifelong effect of those childhood experiences. Interviews were also commissioned with welfare professionals, employees in homes, politicians and advocates, providing context and insights into the policies and systems of care. Interviewees were selected to represent a range of demographic factors and experiences and interviews were conducted across Australia. The project has also resulted in the addition of significant archival collections, self-published autobiographies and ephemera.

Improve our national collection discovery service, Trove, and extend Trove to include journal articles and licensed e-resources.

Almost 300 million resources are now available through Trove. Many of these resources are high-quality journal articles included in licensed datasets. Trove users who are members of libraries subscribing to these datasets can access individual articles via Trove at their local libraries or by including their library membership details in their Trove profile. 

The Library’s program for integrating its successful format-specific discovery services into Trove is now complete. Picture Australia, which provided an indispensable starting point for Australians seeking online images of their country and its culture, was decommissioned as a separate service in June 2012, as was Music Australia, which provided a ‘one-stop shop’ for users interested in Australian musicians and printed and recorded music. All Picture Australia and Music Australia content is now available through Trove. The consolidation of these and other format-specific services, such as the Register of Australian Archives and Manuscripts and Australia’s Research Online, allows the Library to concentrate its resources in a single service, ensuring that new service developments are available to all users, regardless of their field of interest. 

In a major achievement, the Library developed an application programming interface that allows NSLA and other libraries, researchers and vendors to copy Trove records to include in their own services. A state library, for example, can request all Trove user annotations and comments on an item held in its collection and display them in its local discovery services. Trove newspaper articles or digitised pictures relating to a particular state, region or locality can be retrieved and displayed in local systems to contextualise collections held locally. Researchers can interrogate the vast body of newspaper text to determine trends in the use of particular words or groups of words indicating themes or concerns. Data can be ‘mashed’ with other sources, such as geospatial data. This development means that Trove now acts as a truly interactive web space, where users can find resources, learn how to access them directly and comment on, interact with and re-use them for their own ‘boutique’ developments.

Improve the performance of Libraries Australia, a national resource-sharing service, by redeveloping the search interface.

Following an intensive review of the Libraries Australia business environment—including a survey to which more than 360 member institutions responded about their local priorities and workflows—the Libraries Australia Search Redevelopment project commenced, with the specifications phase completed during the financial year. Search is central to the Libraries Australia service array and is used daily by over 1,000 libraries. During 2011–12, the current software supporting the service reached capacity and the redeveloped service, due to be delivered in 2013, will offer Libraries Australia members significant workflow and timeliness improvements. The redeveloped Search service will leverage existing Trove infrastructure, further consolidating the Library’s development effort and maximising returns on Trove investment.

Participate in and contribute to the work of international library bodies, including the Committee of Principals, the Conference of Directors of National Libraries and the International Federation of Library Associations.

The Director-General attended the annual congress of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) and the annual Conference of Directors of National Libraries (CDNL), held in Puerto Rico in August 2011. The Director-General participated in meetings of the IFLA National Libraries Section and discussion groups within CDNL on issues of mutual interest to national libraries, including the collecting and management of digital collections.

In August 2011, the Assistant Director-General, Collections Management, participated in a meeting of the Committee of Principals, the international library body responsible for overseeing development of Resource Description and Access, the new descriptive cataloguing rules. 

Issues and Developments

Trove use is almost two-thirds higher than last financial year, with just under 50,000 user visits per day; Trove traffic now accounts for almost 60 per cent of the Library’s total bandwidth. Use of mobile devices to access Trove has quadrupled. With seven per cent (and rapidly rising) of all searches now conducted on smartphones and other mobile devices, optimising Trove services for these devices is a high development priority. Trove users continue to embrace the many Web 2.0 and social media options that allow them to interact with Trove content. Users routinely correct more than 100,000 lines of text daily—two dedicated individuals have each corrected over one million lines of text—and new Trove lists are being created in their hundreds each month. Trove’s Twitter followers have quadrupled over the course of the year, with more than 2,100 individuals following Trove’s tweets, which connect current events with Trove collection items, especially historical newspaper articles. Recent tweets have encompassed subjects ranging from the deaths of Margaret Whitlam, Murray Rose and Jimmy Little, to the trials that formed the basis of the ABC’s popular Australia on Trial series, to stories of hardy women giving birth in uncongenial circumstances.

The coverage and quality of the Australian National Bibliographic Database (ANBD) were substantially improved during the year. Several state and university libraries added large batch loads of records or provided large files to refresh information on their library holdings. It was particularly pleasing to see a large number of records, generated partly as a result of the Reimagining Libraries Description and Cataloguing Project, start to flow through to the ANBD. Combined with inclusion of large datasets from publishers and international libraries, such as the Library of Congress, this significantly improved Australian libraries’ access to high-quality records to support their collection management and other workflows. Data quality was enhanced using duplicate detection software against a number of different match keys; almost 500,000 duplicate records were removed in a 12-month period. 

The NSLA Consortium achieved the first stage of its core set vision. Eight high-quality e-resources are available to all registered patrons of NSLA libraries, both onsite and from the place of their choice, and good progress is being made on adding products to the core set. In a sign of the value that NSLA libraries place on the consortium, members agreed to substantially increase their contribution to the Library’s administration costs, ensuring the consortium’s long-term sustainability.

The Executive Committee of the Electronic Resources Australia (ERA) Consortium undertook a review of the consortium and sought feedback from Australian libraries on its findings and recommendations. The review was valuable in informing consideration of ER A’ s purpose, values and sustainability. 

Performance

Table 3.8 shows deliverables and key performance indicators in relation to providing and supporting collaborative projects and services in 2011–12.

Table 3.8: Provide and Support Collaborative Projects and Services—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2011–12
 MeasureTargetAchieved

Deliverables

Agencies subscribing to key collaborative services [#]

2,310

2,437 

 

Records/items contributed by subscribing agencies [#] (millions)

15.059 

26.645  

Key performance indicators

Collaborative services standards and timeframes [%]

97.0

98.0

Figure 3.5: Number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative Services

Figure 3.5: Number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative
            Services

Figure 3.5: Number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative Services Data in Table Format
YearTargetAchieved
2008-20092,0802,057
2009-20102,0712,090
2010-20112,2802,339
2011-20122,3102,437
2012-20132,355 
2013-20142,390 

The target was exceeded due to an increase in the number of subscribers to ERA.

Figure 3.6: Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies

Figure
                3.6: Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies

Figure 3.6: Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies Data in Table Format
YearTargetAchieved
2008-20092,396,0003,498,740
2009-20102,561,0004,474,130
2010-201117,205,00032,303,179
2011-201215,058,65026,644,539
2012-201316,659,000 
2013-201416,659,000 

The increase in the number of items that were contributed by subscribing agencies is the result of a significant increase in the number of newspaper articles contributed to Trove and to several large batch loads of records added to the ANBD.

Table 3.9: Collaborative Services Standards and Timeframes [%]
Achieved
Achieved
Target
Target

2008–09

2009–10

2009–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

99.0

97.8

96.6

98.0

97.0

97.0

97.0

97.0

Service standards and timeframes were exceeded, due largely to completion of a project to review and renew Libraries Australia help pages, with a resulting reduction in Libraries Australia enquiries.

Annual Report - Financial Statements

Annual Report - Appendicies

Annual Report - Appendix A: The Council of the National Library of Australia and its Committees

Council

Chair

The Hon. James J. Spigelman ACThe Hon. James J. Spigelman AC, BA (Hons) (Sydney), LLB (Hons) (Sydney)
Non-executive member, New South Wales
Chair, Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Appointed on 29 June 2010 for a three-year term until 28 June 2013
Resigned from the Council with effect from 30 June 2012
Attended six of six meetings

 

 

 

Deputy Chair

Professor John Hay ACCProfessor John Hay AC, BA (Hons) (WA & Cambridge), MA (Cambridge), PhD (WA), LLD (Qld), DU (QUT), LittD (Deakin), DLitt (WA), FAIM, FAHA, FACE, FQA
Non-executive member, Queensland
Chair, Australian Learning and Teaching Council
Chair, Board of Trustees, Queensland Art Gallery
Chair, Martin Institute
Chair, Queensland Institute for Medical Research
Reappointed on 15 May 2011 for a three-year term until 14 May 2014
Resigned from the Council with effect from 30 June 2012
Attended three of six meetings

 

Members

The Hon. Dick Adams MPThe Hon. Dick Adams MP
Non-executive member, Tasmania
Federal Member for Lyons
Elected by the House of Representatives on 13 May 2011 for a three-year term until 12 May 2014
Attended five of six meetings

 

 

 

Mr Richard Eccles BA (ANU), MA<br />
            (NSW)Mr Richard Eccles BA (ANU), MA (NSW)
Non-executive member, Australian Capital Territory
Deputy Secretary, Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport
Appointed on 29 September 2011 for a three-year term until 28 September 2014
Attended three of five eligible meetings

 

 

 

Ms Jane Hemstritch BSc (Hons) (London), FCA, FAICDMs Jane Hemstritch BSc (Hons) (London), FCA, FAICD
Non-executive member, Victoria
Non-executive Director, Victorian Opera
Non-executive Director, Santos Ltd
Non-executive Director, Tabcorp Holdings Ltd
Non-executive Director, Commonwealth Bank of Australia
Non-executive Director and Deputy Chairman, The Global Foundation
Appointed on 29 June 2010 for a three-year term until 28 June 2013
Attended four of six meetings

 

 

Senator Gary Humphries BA, LLB (ANU)Senator Gary Humphries BA, LLB (ANU)
Non-executive member, Australian Capital Territory
Senator for the Australian Capital Territory
Elected by the Senate on 1 July 2011 for a three-year term until 30 June 2014
Attended three of six meetings

 

 

 

 

Ms Mary Kostakidis BA, Dip. Ed.<br />
            (Sydney)Ms Mary Kostakidis BA, Dip. Ed. (Sydney)
Non-executive member, New South Wales
Member, Sydney Peace Foundation Advisory Panel
Board member, Sydney Theatre Company
ResMed Foundation
Appointed on 12 November 2009 for a three-year term until 11 November 2012
Attended five of six meetings

 

 

 

Mr Brian Long FCAMr Brian Long FCA
Non-executive member, New South Wales
Deputy Chairman, Network Ten Holdings Ltd
Non-executive Director, Commonwealth Bank of Australia
Chairman, Audit Committee and Member of the Council of the 
University of NSW
Chairman, United Way Australia
Director, Cantarella Brothers Pty Ltd
Reappointed on 12 November 2009 for a third three-year term until 11 November 2012
Attended four of six meetings

 

Mr Kevin McCann AM, BA, LLB (Hons) (Sydney), LLM (Harvard), FAICDMr Kevin McCann AM, BA, LLB (Hons) (Sydney), LLM (Harvard), FAICD
Non-executive member, New South Wales
Chair, National Library of Australia Foundation Board
Member, University of Sydney Senate
President (NSW) and Board member, Australian Institute of Company Directors
Member, Corporate Governance Committee, Australian Institute of Company Directors
Member, Evans and Partners Advisory Board
Chairman, Origin Energy Limited
Chairman, Macquarie Group Limited and Macquarie Bank Limited
Director, BlueScope Steel Limited
Reappointed on 15 December 2008 for a second three-year term until 14 December 2011
Attended three of three eligible meetings

Dr Nonja Peters BA (Hons), PhD (WA)Dr Nonja Peters BA (Hons), PhD (WA)
Non-executive member, Western Australia
Senior Lecturer and Director, History of Migration Experiences Centre, Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute 
Appointed on 20 May 2010 for a three-year term until 19 May 2013
Attended six of six meetings

 

 

 

Ms Deborah Thomas Dip. Fine Art (Monash),<br />
                    MAICDMs Deborah Thomas Dip. Fine Art (Monash), MAICD
Non-executive member, New South Wales
Director, Media, Public Affairs and Brand Development, ACP Magazines Pty Ltd
Board member, Surf Life Saving Foundation
Board member, Taronga Conservation Society Australia
Member, Cancer Australia Advisory Committee
Reappointed on 12 November 2009 for a second three-year term until 11 November 2012
Attended six of six meetings

 

 

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich, BA<br />
                    (Hons)(Macquarie), Dip. Information Management<br />
            (NSW)Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich, BA (Hons)(Macquarie), Dip. Information Management (NSW)
Director-General and executive member, Australian Capital Territory
Appointed on 9 February 2011 and commenced on 11 March 2011 for a five-year term until 8 February 2016
Attended six of six meetings

 

 

 

Meetings

Council met on:

  • 5 August 2011
  • 7 October 2011
  • 2 December 2011
  • 3 February 2012
  • 13 April 2012
  • 1 June 2012.

Audit Committee

Chair

Mr Brian Long
Non-executive member of Council
Appointed to the Committee 6 June 2003
Reappointed as Chair and member of the Committee 5 February 2010
Attended three of three meetings

Members

Professor John Hay AC
Deputy Chair of Council
Appointed to the Committee 5 June 2009 and reappointed 5 February 2010
Attended two of three meetings

Ms Deborah Thomas
Non-executive member of Council
Appointed to the Committee 5 February 2010
Attended three of three meetings

Ms Jane Hemstritch
Appointed to the Committee 
2 December 2011
Attended nil of one eligible meeting

Mr Geoff Knuckey
External member
Appointed to the Committee 1 May 2012
Attended nil of nil eligible meetings

Other Council members attended meetings as follows:

  • The Hon. James J. Spigelman AC (three)
  • Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich (three)
  • The Hon. Dick Adams MP (one)
  • Dr Nonja Peters (one).

Terms of Reference

The Audit Committee’s terms of reference are to:

  • help the Library and members of Council to comply with obligations under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997
  • provide a forum for communication between the members of Council, senior managers of the Library and the Library’s internal and external auditors
  • satisfy itself that there is an appropriate ethical climate in the Library and review policies relating to internal controls and management of risks.

Meetings

The Audit Committee met on:

  • 5 August 2011
  • 2 December 2011
  • 13 April 2012.

Corporate Governance Committee

Chair

Professor John Hay AC
Deputy Chair of Council
Attended one of two meetings

Members

The Hon. James J. Spigelman AC
Chair of Council
Attended two of two meetings

Mr Brian Long
Chair of Audit Committee
Attended two of two meetings

Ms Deborah Thomas
Non-executive member of Council
Attended two of two meetings

Terms of Reference

The Corporate Governance Committee’s terms of reference are to:

  • evaluate the effectiveness of Council in its role in corporate governance
  • evaluate the performance and remuneration of the Director-General
  • oversight the development of a list of prospective members for appointment to Council, subject to consideration and approval by the Minister.

Meetings

The Corporate Governance Committee met on:

  • 3 February 2012
  • 1 June 2012.

Annual Report - Appendix B: National Library of Australia Foundation Board

Chair

Mr Kevin McCann AM

Members

Ms Jasmine Cameron
National Library of Australia

Ms Doreen Mellor (until 1 May 2012)
National Library of Australia

Mrs Cathy Pilgrim (from 2 May 2012)
National Library of Australia

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich
National Library of Australia

Ms Deborah Thomas
National Library of Australia Council

The Lady Ebury

Ms Lorraine Elliott

Ms Julia King

Ms Janet McDonald AO

Secretariat

Development Office
National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

At the 2 December 2011 meeting, Council endorsed changing the name of the Development Council to the Foundation Board and also agreed to revised terms of reference, as follows:

  • to provide advice on Library fundraising targets
  • to provide assistance and advice on major fundraising campaigns, events and associated activities
  • to assist in obtaining funds from a variety of sources, including the business and philanthropic sectors
  • to encourage individual members to personally contribute or actively secure amounts required for nominated Library fundraising appeals.

Council also agreed that the Foundation Board will continue its close association with Council through regular reporting and through a member of Council being either a member or Chair of the Foundation Board. The number of Foundation Board members was increased to provide scope for a range of advocacy approaches to optimise the level of support generated, including:

  • commitment by members to either secure funds or to make individual donations
  • capacity and willingness to collectively pursue and generate major corporate support
  • capacity and willingness to collectively pursue and generate major philanthropic support
  • ability to facilitate engagement with potential supporters across Australia and gain their commitment to supporting the Library.

Annual Report - Appendix C: National Library of Australia Committees

Three committees provide advice to the Library:

  • Libraries Australia Advisory Committee
  • Fellowships Advisory Committee
  • Community Heritage Grants Steering Committee.

Libraries Australia Advisory Committee

Chair

Ms Anne Horn
Deakin University

Members

Ms Liz Burke
Murdoch University

Dr Alex Byrne (from February 2012)
State Library of New South Wales

Mr Peter Conlon (from February 2012)
Queanbeyan City Library

Ms Pamela Gatenby
National Library of Australia

Ms Noelle Nelson (until December 2011)
State Library of New South Wales

Mr Ben O’Carroll (from February 2012)
Queensland Department of Premier and Cabinet

Ms Ann Ritchie
Australian Library Journal

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich
National Library of Australia

Ms Rosa Serratore
National Meteorological Library

Mr Geoff Strempel
Public Library Services (South Australia)

Ms Monika Szunejko (until December 2011)
State Library of Western Australia

Mr Chris Taylor (until December 2011)
University of Queensland

Mr Andrew Wells
University of New South Wales

Secretariat

Resource Sharing Division
National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Libraries Australia Advisory Committee provides advice on strategic and policy issues affecting the delivery of the Libraries Australia service, the broad direction of service development and changes occurring in the library community that are likely to affect services.

Fellowships Advisory Committee

Chair

Professor John Hay AC, FAHA

National Library of Australia Council

Members

Professor Graeme Clarke AO, FAHA
Australian Academy of the Humanities

Dr Patricia Clarke OAM, FAHA
Australian Society of Authors

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich
National Library of Australia

Emeritus Professor Rod Home AM, FAHA
Australian Academy of Science

Professor Julie Marcus
Independent Scholars Association of Australia

Professor Pat Jalland FASSA
Australian Academy of the Social Sciences

Professor Joyce Kirk
Australian Library and Information Association

Secretariat

Australian Collections and Reader Services Division
National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Fellowships Advisory Committee’s terms of reference are to make recommendations to the Council on the award and administration of fellowships and scholarships.

Community Heritage Grants Steering Committee

Chair

Ms Jasmine Cameron
National Library of Australia

Members

Ms Kim Brunoro
Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport

Ms Helen Walker
National Archives of Australia

Ms Helen Kon
National Museum of Australia 

Ms Meg Labrum
National Film and Sound Archive

Ms Dianne Dahlitz
National Library of Australia

Ms Rosemary Turner
National Library of Australia

Secretariat

Executive and Public Programs Division
National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Community Heritage Grants Steering Committee provides advice and direction on matters associated with the Community Heritage Grants program, including policy and administration. It also facilitates the exchange of information about the program between the Library and funding partners.

Annual Report - Appendix D: Key Supporting Policies and Documents

Information about the Library’s functions, objectives, policies and activities can be found in the documents listed below. Most policy documents are available on the Library’s website.

Legislation

Commonwealth Authorities and Companies
Act 1997 

National Library Act 1960

National Library Regulations (1994)

Portfolio Budget Statement

Public Service Act 1999

Strategic and Operational

Balanced Scorecard 

Building Long Term Strategic Management
Plan (2009)

Business Continuity Framework (2012)

IT Strategic Plan (2012–15)

Risk Management Register (2011)

Social Media Policy (2010–12)

Strategic Directions 2012–14 

Strategic Workforce Plan (2012–14)

Collection

Collection Development Policy (2008)

Cataloguing

Cataloguing Authority Control Policy (2011)

Cataloguing Policy (2011)

E-resources

Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Policy (2011)

Collection Digitisation Policy (2009)

Preservation

Collection Disaster Plan (2012)

Digital Preservation Policy (2012)

Policy on Participation in Cooperative Microfilming Projects with Other
Institutions (2010)

Policy on Preservation Copying of Collection Materials (2007)

Preservation Policy (2009)

Service Charter

Policy on Handling Complaints and Other User Feedback (2011) 

Service Charter (2011)

Reader Services

Code of Conduct for Readers and Visitors (2011) 

Information and Research Services Policy (2011)

Corporate Services

Disability Framework (2011) 

Enterprise Agreement (2011–14)

Environmental Management System (2011)

Fraud Control Plan (2012–13)

Protective Security Policy and Procedures (2006)

User Charging Policy (2011)

Public Programs

Events Policy (2011)

Exhibitions Loans Policy (2011) 

Exhibitions Policy (2011)

Learning Policy (2011)

Policy on Sponsorship and Fundraising (2006)

Publications Policy (2012)

Volunteer Program Policy (2010)

Annual Report - Appendix E: Consultancy Services

The following table shows new consultancy services with an individual value of $10,000 or more that were let in 2011–12, the nature of the consultancy, its value or estimated value, the selection process and justification of the decision to use the consultancy.

Table E.1: Consultancy Services Engaged, 2011–12

Consultant

Purpose

 Contract price ($)*

Selection process

Justification (see above note)

AdminIntelligence Pty Ltd

Review human resource system configuration and provide advice on and develop enhancements to existing processes

$11,000 

Direct sourcing

B

Ashurst (formerly Blake Dawson)

General legal advice 

$44,383 

Open tender

B

Bendelta Pty Ltd

Assist in the development of the Strategic Workforce Plan (2012–14)

$32,115 

Direct sourcing

A&B

Clayton Utz

General legal advice

$99,925 

Open tender

B

Cunningham Martyn Design Pty Ltd

Design services for Foyer, amenities, cloak room and
stair refurbishment

$156,860 

Direct sourcing

B

Dimension Data Aust Pty Ltd

IT Data Centre energy assessment

$16,056 

Direct sourcing

B

GHD Pty Ltd

Assessment of the marble facade of the main building

$21,912 

Open tender

B

Interiors Australia

Fitout design services for the Level 1 office space

$64,350 

Open tender

B

Jakeman Business Solutions Pty Ltd

Review of the Library’s Protective Security Policy

$21,340 

Direct sourcing

B

Jillian Adams

Development of post–Forgotten Australians project
recording plan and feasibility study

$10,000 

Direct sourcing

A&B

John Raineri and Associates

Review of lighting in the main building

$97,000 

Select tender

B

Leo Monus

Development of software for Android mobile
catalogue application

$22,000 

Direct sourcing

B

Norman Disney and Young

Mechanical investigation of chiller plant

$10,000 

Open tender

B

Oxide Interactive Pty Ltd

Tailoring of a customer relationship management system
for Trove

$12,298 

Direct sourcing

B

Paul Tilse Architects

Architectural services for new storage area

$13,866 

Direct sourcing

B

Risk and Continuity Management Pty Ltd

Review of the Library’s Business Continuity Plan

$18,634 

Select tender

B

Steven McPhillips

Analyse and develop aspects of Voyager and ILMS
software systems interface

$51,650 

Direct sourcing

A&B

Teaspoon Consulting Pty Ltd

Analyse and develop aspects of Voyager and ILMS
software systems interface

$48,950 

Direct sourcing

A&B

Terri Janke and Co.

Legal advice on copyright, licensing and Indigenous
culture protocols

$21,233 

Direct sourcing

B

ValueEdge Consulting Pty Ltd

Undertake a value review of two management units

$35,905 

Direct sourcing

B

Total

 

$809,477 

 

 

The following justifications are the rationales for the decisions to undertake consultancies:

A-—skills currently unavailable within organisation
B-—need for specialised or professional skills
C-—need for independent research or assessment.

*Values are GST inclusive


Annual Report - Appendix F: Staffing Overview

With the exception of the Director-General, all Library staff are employed under the Public Service Act 1999. Conditions of employment for staff below the Senior Executive Service (SES) level are contained in the Library’s Enterprise Agreement 2011–14. Some staff received enhanced benefits through an Individual Flexibility Arrangement. At 30 June 2012, the Library had 398 full-time and part-time ongoing staff, 66 full-time and part-time non-ongoing staff and 24 casual staff. Refer to Table F.1 for more details.The average full-time equivalent staffing level for 2011–12 was 429, compared to 438 in 2010–11.

Staff Distribution

Table F.1: Staff Distribution by Division, 30 June 2012
DivisionOngoingNon-ongoingTotal 2011–12Total 2010–11
 Full timePart timeFull timePart timeCasual
Collections Management 128275813181172
Australian Collections and Reader Services 792112167135122
Resource Sharing 2711002933
Information Technology 3553114542
Executive and Public Programs 33119315752
Corporate Services 2836224140
Total33068363024488461

Staff Classification

Table F.2: Ongoing and Non-ongoing Full-time and Part-time Staff by Classification and Gender, 30 June 2012
ClassificationOngoingNon-ongoingTotal 2011–12Total 2010–11
Full timePart timeFull timePart timeCasual
MFMFMFMFMFMFMF
Statutory office holder 00000100000101
SES Band 1 24000000002424
EL 2 11150000000011151314
EL 1 30293501001134363339
APS 6 174211714110120651957
APS 5 173611441160123582051
APS 4 174901206022119701763
Graduate 01000000000102
APS 3 13380909141015601657
APS 21706454107916371240
APS 1 00000000000010
Cadet01000000000100
Total1082225639277231113140348133328
Grand total33068363024488461

Note: Table is based on paid employees. Employees on long-term leave for more than 12 weeks are not included.

SES Staff Movements

Dr Marie-Louise Ayres was promoted to Assistant Director-General, Resource Sharing, on 29 August 2011.

Dr Warwick Cathro, Assistant Director-General, Resource Sharing and Innovation, retired 15 March 2012. Dr Cathro had been on extended leave since 14 June 2011.

Equal Employment Opportunity

Table F.3: Staff by Equal Employment Opportunity Group and APS Classification, 30 June 2012
ClassificationMaleFemaleTotalIndigenous peoplesPeople with disabilitiesCulturally and linguistically diverse background 
Statutory office holder 011001
SES Band 1 246010
EL 2 111526014
EL 1 3436700311
APS 6 2065850414
APS 5 2358812018
APS 4 1970890425
Graduate011100
APS 31560751625
APS 21637530017
APS 1 000000
Cadet011100
Total140348488519115

Note: Data for equal employment opportunity groups are based on information supplied voluntarily by staff.

Staff Training

The Library develops an annual Staff Training Plan. 

The plan is developed through consultation with all areas of the Library and includes priorities identified through the Library’s Strategic Workforce Plan, division business plans and the individual performance development plans of staff. 

Staff undertook development opportunities via internal and external programs, including seminars, workshops and on-the-job training and placements. Training opportunities covered Library technical skills, such as cataloguing, digital publications and preservation, as well as capability development in oral communication and management skills, procurement, writing and strategic planning. Diversity training was also undertaken, including disability confidence and Indigenous cultural awareness training.

The Library continues to use an e-learning induction activity for new staff and developed a new online module in 2011–12 to assist staff in understanding the Library’s work health and safety (WHS) environment. The online induction modules complement the Library’s face-to-face induction sessions and strengthen important messages about the Library’s workplace and APS Values.

In 2011–12, there was a strong focus on WHS training for staff and managers. The training covered the new framework, the responsibilities of all stakeholders and how they relate to the workplace. Health and wellbeing activities focused on psychological health and how to build personal resilience. Designated staff updated or received certification to be officers in first aid, WHS and workplace harassment. 

The total training and development expenditure, excluding staff time, was $389,415. The number of training days undertaken by staff is set out in Table F.4.

Table F.4: Training Days, 2011–12
ClassificationMaleFemaleTotal
SES151429
EL 1–2161208369
APS 5–6143317460
APS 1–480424504
Total3999631,362 

Annual Report - Appendix G: Gifts, Grants and Sponsorships

Substantial Collection Material Donations

Ms Robyn Archer AO

Professor David Armstrong AO

Ms Elizabeth Bates

Ms Jane Campion

Mrs Julie Carver

Dr Patricia Clarke OAM

Lady Anna Cowen

The family of Sir James and Lady Margaret Darling

Ms Merrell Davis OAM

Professor Niki Ellis

Dr Andrew Ford

Sir James Gobbo AC

Professor Alexander Grishin

Dr Jamie Kassler

Dr Michael Kassler

Mr Lou Klepac OAM

Dr Phillip Law AC

Mr Roger McDonald

Mr Ian Mason

Ms Penelope Mlakar

Mr Alan Moir

Mr George Ogilvie AM

Ms Jacqueline Pascarl

Mr Geoffrey Pryor

Ms Diane Romney

Ms Jane Sullivan

Mr Gareth Thomas

Ms Josephine Wittenburg

Grants

Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport Office for the Arts

National Archives of Australia

National Cultural Heritage Account

National Film and Sound Archive

National Museum of Australia

Sponsorships

Australian Capital Tourism (Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin)

The Brassey of Canberra

Dataflex (Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin)

Etihad Airways (Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin)

Faber-Castell (Australia) Pty Ltd (Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin)

Forrest Hotel and Apartments

Leighton Holdings Limited (Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin)

McCormick Foods Australia (Treasures Gallery)

Bequests

The Estate of Dr H.C. Coombs

The Estate of Mr John Anthony (Tony) Gilbert

The Estate of Mr Harold S. Williams

Support a Book Program

Dr Diana Carroll

Fellowships

Friends of the National Library of Australia (Friends of the National Library Travelling Fellowship)

Mrs Pat McCann (Norman McCann Summer Scholarship)

Mrs Alison Sanchez (Kenneth Binns Travelling Fellowship)

Dr John Seymour and Dr Heather Seymour AO (Seymour Summer Scholarship)

Other Projects

Australian Capital Tourism (ENLIGHTEN)

Mr John B. Fairfax AO (The Canberra Times digitisation)

Friends of the National Library of Australia (The Canberra Times digitisation)

Dr Stephen Holt (The Canberra Times digitisation)

Mr Kevin McCann AM (Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia)

Origin Foundation (Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia)

Questacon (The Canberra Times digitisation)

Mrs Alison Sanchez (Kenneth Binns Lecture)

Mr Stephen Yorke (The Canberra Times digitisation)

Annual Report - Appendix H: National Library of Australia Fund

The National Library of Australia Fund, launched in 2009, helps the Library to manage, describe, preserve, digitise and deliver our documentary heritage collections to the widest possible audience, both online and from the main building.  

National Library of Australia Fund donors are acknowledged at the following gift levels:

  • Platinum Patron—gifts of $100,000 and above
  • Gold Patron—gifts of $50,000 and above
  • Silver Patron—gifts of $25,000 and above
  • Bronze Patron—gifts of $10,000 and above
  • Patron—gifts of $1,000 and above
  • Donor—gifts up to $1,000

The Library gratefully acknowledges the generosity and support of patrons and donors.
Listed below are patrons who have given to the fund since its inception in 2009 and donors who have given during 2011–12.

Silver Patrons

Dr Ron Houghton DFC and Mrs Nanette Houghton

One supporter has donated anonymously at this level

Bronze Patrons

Associate Professor Noel Dan AM and Mrs Adrienne Dan

Ms Jane Hemstritch

One supporter has donated anonymously at this level.

Patrons 

Dr Marion Amies

Arkajon Communications Pty Ltd

Mr Sam Bartone

Mrs Jennifer Batrouney SC

Mrs Phoebe Bischoff OAM

Mrs Josephine Calaby

Emeritus Professor David Carment AM

Dr Patricia Clarke OAM 

Mr Victor Crittenden OAM

Ms Lauraine Diggins

The Lady Ebury

Dr Suzanne Falkiner

Mr Andrew Freeman

Ms Jan Fullerton AO

Ms Christina Goode PSM

Mrs Claudia Hyles

Ms Anna Katzmann

Dr Terry Kirk and Professor Joyce Kirk

Ms Marjorie Lindenmayer

Dr Jan Lyall PSM

Ms Janet Manuell SC

Mrs Vacharin McFadden

Mr Peter McGovern AM

Capt. Paul J. McKay

Ms Fiona McLeod SC

Dr Kenneth Moss AM and Mrs Glennis Moss

Ms Jane Needham SC

Mr John Oliver and Mrs Libby Oliver

Dr Melissa A. Perry QC

Mrs Pamela Pickering

Professor Alan Robson AM

Miss Kay Rodda

Professor Michael Roe

Ms Chris Ronalds AM, SC

Mrs Margaret S. Ross AM

Rotru Investments Pty Ltd for Mrs Eve Mahlab AO

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich and Mr Stephen Yorke

The Reverend Garth Shaw

Mr William Thorn and Mrs Angela Thorn

Mr John Ulm and Mrs Valda Ulm

Mr Gerald Walsh MA

Ms Lucille Warth

Ms Laura Wells

Mrs Joy Wheatley

Mr A.G.D White OAM

Dr Michael W. Young

Five supporters have donated anonymously at this level 

Donors

Alexandra Club, Melbourne

Mr Kim Allen

Mrs Patricia Allen

Mrs Margaret Astbury

Ms Virginia Berger

Ms Baiba Berzins

Mr Udai N. Bhati

Mr Richard Blavins

Ms Emily Booker

Mr John Brook

Ms Allison Brouwer

Mr William Brown

Mr David Burke OAM

Associate Professor John Carmody

Ms Jennifer Carrington

Ms Marianne Cavanagh

Mr John Chapman

Mr Joseph Clarke

Dr Diana Wood Conroy

Mrs Mary Crean 

Mr B.R. Crisp

Mr Edward Crook

Ms Debra Cunningham

Ms Merl Cuzens

Mr J.W. de B. Persse

Dr Bronwen Douglas

The Hon. Robert J. Ellicott QC

Dr Neville Exon

Mrs Helen Ferber

Mr Dennis Forte 

Ms Saw Gaik Khong

Ms Milena Gates

Mrs Elizabeth Gilchrist

Ms Sylvia Glanville

Mr Harry Gordon CMG, AM

Dr Tom Griffiths

Mrs Sarah Guest

Justice Roger V. Gyles AO

Mrs Isobel E. Hamilton

Professor Margaret Harris

Mr Brian Hickey

Ms Sara Hood

Mrs Jill Hutson

Mr Paul Jones 

Ms Joan Kennedy

Mr Peter Kennedy 

Mr David Kennemore

Dr James S. Kerr AM

Dr Ruth Kerr OAM

Mr Gordon Kerry

Professor Wallace Kirsop

Ms Bron Kolano

Mr Geoff Ledger DSC

Ms Elizabeth MacDonald

Mrs Svetlana Manns

Mr Robert B. Mark JP

Mrs Margaret J Mashford

Emeritus Professor Isabel McBryde AO

Dr Ken McCracken

Dr Donald F. McMichael AM

Dr Stephen McNamara

Mr Rob Milliken

Mrs Mary Mitchell

Ms Marion Newman

Mr Robert K. O’Connor QC

Mr F K Overheu and Mrs Helen Overheu

Mrs Elaine Pearson

Ms M.E. Phillips

Mrs Cathy Pilgrim and Mr Steven Anderson

Mrs Winsome Plumb

Dr Peter Pockley

Mr Bryce Ponsford

Mr Chester Porter QC

Ms Gillian Pratt

Mrs Dorothy Prescott OAM and Mr Victor Prescott

Professor Emeritus Wilfrid Prest

Mrs Anne S. Prins

Dr Peter J. Puszet

Mr John Quaid

Emeritus Professor John Ramsland OAM

Mrs Elizabeth Richardson OAM

Ms Katherine R. Rivett

Mr William Rutledge and Mrs Julia Rutledge

Mrs Florine Simon

Mrs Aileen Sproule

Mr Peter Spyropoulos and Mrs Maria Spyropoulos

Mrs Helene Stead

Dr Jennifer Strauss AM

Mr Charles Stuart and Mrs Gay Stuart

Mrs Rhonda Thiele

Mrs Doris Thompson

Mr Sam Ure-Smith OAM

Mrs Sheila Waters

Ms Margaret Watts

Mr Kerry Webb and Mrs Judith Webb

Ms Mary-Louise Weight

Dr Auriol Weigold

Mr Doug Wickens

The Reverend Dr Robert S.M. Withycombe

Ms Helen White

Miss Helen Woodger

Twenty-two supporters have donated anonymously at this level

Annual Report - Appendix I: Treasures Gallery

Treasures Gallery Appeal

The generosity and support of many individuals and organisations has made possible a new permanent exhibition space within the Library. The Treasures Gallery, which opened in October 2011, showcases selections from the Library’s significant, rare and often surprising collections. Early maps and atlases, books, manuscripts, paintings, drawings, photographs and objects all feature in the Treasures Gallery—from James Cook’s Endeavour journal to William Bligh’s list of mutineers, from Patrick White’s glasses to an original manuscript for Waltzing Matilda. Since opening, the Treasures Gallery has quickly become an important part of Australia’s cultural life.

Treasures Gallery Partners are acknowledged at the following gift levels:

  • Principal Treasures Gallery Partner—$1 million and above
  • Platinum Treasures Gallery Partner—$250,000 and above
  • Gold Treasures Gallery Partner—$100,000 and above
  • Silver Treasures Gallery Partner—$50,000 and above
  • Bronze Treasures Gallery Partner—$25,000 and above
  • Opal Treasures Gallery Partner—$10,000 and above
  • Jade Treasures Gallery Partner—$5,000 and above
  • Amber Treasures Gallery Partner—up to $5,000

The individuals and organisations listed below have collectively contributed more than $3 million to the Treasures Gallery Appeal since it commenced in 2001. Many other individual supporters also contributed generously through the Exhibitions Donation Box. The Library gratefully acknowledges and appreciates their generosity and vision. With the opening of the Treasures Gallery in 2011, this appeal is now closed.

Principal Treasures Gallery Partner

The Ian Potter Foundation

Platinum Treasures Gallery Partners

AAMI Limited

John T. Reid Charitable Trusts

Sidney Myer Fund

Gold Treasures Gallery Partners

ActewAGL*

Dr James Bettison and Ms Helen James

Professor Henry Ergas

Harold Mitchell Foundation

Macquarie Group Foundation

Mr Kevin McCann AM

Thyne Reid Foundation

Silver Treasures Gallery Partner

Friends of the National Library of Australia

Bronze Treasures Gallery Partners

Mr James Bain AM and Mrs Janette Bain

Mr Victor Crittenden OAM

Mr James O. Fairfax AC

Opal Treasures Gallery Partners

F. and J. Ryan Foundation

Mr Philip Flood AO and Mrs Carole Flood

GHD Pty Ltd*

Dr Kenneth Moss AM and Mrs Glennis Moss

Jade Treasures Gallery Partners

Ms Cynthia Anderson

Dr Desmond Bright and Dr Ruth Bright AM

Mr Michael Heard and Mrs Mary Heard

Mr Robert Hill-Ling AO and Mrs Rosemary Hill-Ling OAM

Mrs Claudia Hyles

Mr Baillieu Myer AC and Mrs Sarah Myer

Miss Kay Rodda

Mrs Mary Louise Simpson

Mr John Uhrig AC and Mrs Shirley Uhrig

One supporter donated anonymously at this level

Amber Treasures Gallery Partners

Mr Karl Alderson

Dr Marion Amies

Ms Nolene Baker

Mr Shane Baker and Ms Linda Pearson

Ms Lucy Bantermalis

Mr and Mrs R.N. Barnett

Dr Pamela Bell OAM

Mrs Jessie Bennett

Mrs Maree Bentley and Mr Geoffrey Bentley

Ms Wendy Bertony

Ms Baiba Berzins

Mr Udai N. Bhati

Mrs Phoebe Bischoff OAM

Mrs Rita M. Bishop

Ashurst (formerly Blake Dawson Waldron)

Mr Kevin J. Blank

Mr Warwick Bradney

Mrs Mary Brennan

Sir Ron Brierley

Mr John H. Brook

Ms Megan Brown

Dr Robert Brown

Dr Thomas Brown AM

Dr Geoffrey A. Burkhardt

Ms Sheila Byard

Mr Graeme Camage and Mrs Elaine Camage

Mr Clyde Cameron AO

Mrs Jennie Cameron

Dr John J. Carmody

Ms Jennifer Carrington

Dr Diana Carroll

Dr Patricia Clarke OAM, FAHA

Mr G. Colson

Dr Veronica Condon

Ms Barbara Connell

Dr Russell Cope PSM

Professor James Cotton

CRA International

Mr Brian R. Crisp

Ms Debra Cunningham

Mr Brian Davidson

Dr Mary Dickenson

Mr Norman Dickins

Ms Rita Dodson

Ms Naomi Doessel

Ms Chris Dormer

Ms Melanie Drake

Mr Ian Dudgeon and Mrs Kay Stoquart

Mr Peter Duffy

Ms Jeanette Dunkley

Ms Kristen Durran

Ms Ennis Easton

Mr Greg Ellway

Mrs Pauline Fanning ISO, MBE

Professor Frank Fenner AC, CMG, MBE

Mrs Shirley Fisher

Mr Anthony Francombe and Mrs Roma Francombe

Dr Donald Gibson

Mr Ross Gibson and Mrs Rellie Gibson

Ms Margot Girle

Ms Sylvia Glanville

Ms Erica Gray

Ms Sue Gray

Mr Jacob Grossbard

Ms K.E. Halfpenny

Mr and Mrs Warren Harding

Mr John Hawkins and Mrs Robyn Hawkins

Ms Marion Hicks

Ms Tracey Hind

Mrs Janet Holmes à Court AO

Dr Stephen Holt

Mrs J.M. Hooper

Mr Neville Horne and Mrs Noreen Horne

Dr Ron Houghton DFC and Mrs Nanette Houghton

Dr Anthea Hyslop

In memory of Mr Reginald Fox and Mrs Phyllis Fox

In memory of Mr Noel Potter

Mr Ashton Johnston

Ms Ruth S. Kerr

Ms A.J. Kitchin

Ms Kaye Lawrence

Mr Paul Legge-Wilkinson and Mrs Beryl Legge-Wilkinson

Mr Andrew Ligertwood and Mrs Virginia Ligertwood

Ms Nina Loder

Ms Louise Luscombe

Mr Donald McDonald AC and Mrs Janet McDonald AO

Dr Rosemary McKenna

Mr G. Meldrum

Mrs Denyse Merchant

Mrs Eveline K. Milne

Mrs Mary Mitchell

Ms G. Morrison

Mr Claude Neumann

Ms Michelle Nichols

Ms Margaret Nixon

Mr John Oliver and Mrs Libby Oliver

Mrs Janette Owen

Mr Angus Paltridge and Mrs Gwen Paltridge

Ms Penny Pardoe-Matthews

Mr J.W. de B. Persse

Lady Joyce Price

Qantas Airways Limited

The Hon. Margaret Reid AO

Mr Chris Richardson and Mrs Cathy Richardson

Mrs Elizabeth Richardson OAM

Mr Jack Ritch and Mrs Diana Ritch 

Ms Colleen Rivers

Mrs Patricia Roberts

Mrs Pamela Robinson 

Professor Alan Robson AM

Mr Alan Rose AO and Mrs Helen Rose

Ms Jane Sandilands

Ms Jude Savage

Mr Graham Scully

Mrs Florine Simon

Ms Jill Smith

Mrs Jane Smyth

Mr Gavin Souter AO and Mrs Ngaire Souter

Mr David Sparrow

Mr Peter Spyropoulos

Mrs Elinor Swan

Mr Jack Taylor and Mrs Jess Taylor

Mr K. Temperley

Mrs Dossie Thompson

Mr Bill Thorn and Mrs Angela Thorn 

Mrs Helen Todd

Mr Anthony Triado

Mrs Geraldine Triffitt

Ms Lisa Turner

Mr J. Visione

Mr Brian Wall and Mrs Margaret Wall

Dr John O. Ward

Ms Kylie Waring and Mr Tim Dyke

Ms Lucille Warth

Mr Sam Weiss and Mrs Judy Weiss

Ms Eve White

Mr Richard White

Professor Robin Woods AM

Words Discussion Group

Four supporters donated anonymously at this level

* Indicates contributors who supplied goods and/or services

Treasures Gallery Support Fund

Individuals and organisations who contribute to the Treasures Gallery Support Fund help the Library to put Australians in touch with Australia’s greatest treasures and the story of our nation’s journey. The fund enables the Library to produce imaginative access programs, provide opportunities for exploring the Treasures Gallery online and respond to inquiring young minds by developing education initiatives based on the gallery.

In 2011–12, the following people generously assisted the Library to achieve these goals:

Dr Marion Amies

Mr Udai N. Bhati

Dr Desmond Bright and Dr Ruth Bright AM

Mr Robert Hill-Ling AO and Mrs Rosemary Hill-Ling OAM

Mrs J.M. Hooper

Ms Katherine Hunter

Dr Ruth S. Kerr OAM

Mrs Pamela Robinson

Dr Maxine Rochester

Mr Alan Rose AO and Mrs Helen Rose

Mrs Nea Storey

Ms Mary-Louise Weight

One supporter donated anonymously to this fund.

Annual Report - Appendix J: Notable Acquistions

In 2011–12, the Library continued an active program of acquiring Australian and overseas publications in print and digital form.

In April 2012, the second bulk harvest of Australian Government websites, conducted under whole-of-government information and communication technology arrangements to collect
freely available government web content, was completed. The harvest collected approximately 800 website domains, which will be accessible through PANDORA: Australia’s Web Archive.

A collaborative project with PANDORA partners commenced to develop collections of websites relating to Australia’s early twenty first century resources boom and to the Murray–Darling Basin. This ongoing project aims to represent the political, social, economic and cultural issues associated with the collecting themes and will be accessible to researchers as curated collections via PANDORA. 

A copy of Australian Folk Songs and Bush Ballads Enhanced E-book PART ONE was purchased to assist with understanding the issues associated with collecting and providing access to complex e-publications. The publication includes video content and comes in a number of different versions, each presenting different issues on how to manage ongoing access.

A number of interesting older and rare publications were acquired during the year, in addition to contemporary overseas publications and mainstream Australian publications acquired under legal deposit provisions. Highlights included:

  • Ongeluckige voyagie, van’t schip Batavia, nae de Oost-Indien (1649), a rare Utrecht edition of François Pelsaert’s account of his voyage along the West Australian coast to Batavia, which completes the Library’s holdings of all early editions of Pelsaert’s account
  • a rare copy of one of Pedro Fernandez de Quirós’ memorials, printed for presentation to the King and Court of Spain (August 1608), in which Quirós replies to objections made to his proposal for settlement of the southern lands; the Quirós memorials are important foundation documents of Australian history
  • a copy of Johann Friedrich Meckel’s Ornithorhynchi paradoxi: Descriptio anatomica (1826), the first monograph on the Australian platypus
  • Xin bian hong wei bing zi liao (A New Collection of Red Guard Publications), an outstanding 112-volume collection of reprinted Red Guard newspapers from the Chinese Cultural Revolution period (1966–1976)
  • Thai Cigarette Cards: The Ramayana, a complete set of 150 cigarette cards depicting characters from the ancient Sanskrit epic, the Ramayana
  • numerous publications and an archive of websites from Japan relating to the March 2011 earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster
  • two rare propaganda publications from Cambodia, donated by a retired diplomat: Images du Kampuchea Democratique (Pictures of Democratic Kampuchea) (1976), depicting the idyllic life of the Cambodian people under the Khmer Rouge, and Norodom Sihanouk en zone libre du Cambodge (1988), showing Norodom Sihanouk’s visits to the Sihanoukist resistance during the period of the Vietnamese occupation of Cambodia
  • volumes 4 and 5 (January–December 1838) of Jugend-Blatter: Monatschrift zur Forderung wahrer Bildung, a German children’s magazine with woodcut illustrations of Australian and South Pacific views, including a print of James Cook being welcomed to Tahiti and of Jean-François de Galaup La Pérouse and his men engaged in combat.

The Library continued to provide online access to key historical resources, including:

  • Making of the Modern World, Part II, 1851–1914, which supplements Part I, 1450–1850
  • JSTOR Arts and Sciences X Collection, adding to the Library’s existing subscription for the Arts and Sciences collections I–IX
  • Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography, via the Gale Virtual Reference Library.

Acquisitions for the Manuscripts Collection included:

  • the papers of entertainer Tex Morton, pioneer aviator Maude Lores Bonney, director George Ogilvie, composer Paul Grabowsky and the Mackay family of pastoralists, and a substantial addition to the papers of former Governor-General Sir Zelman Cowen
  • a small collection of letters from French scientists and expeditioners Joseph Paul Gaimard and Jean Rene Constant Quoy, adding to holdings related to the navigator Louis de Freycinet.

Highlights of the acquisitions for the Pictures Collection included:

  • Chrysanthemums (c. 1890), an expressive oil floral study by Ellis Rowan, which complements the Library’s extensive collection of the artist’s watercolours
  • a pencil portrait of the artist Fred Williams by John Brack
  • a series of photographs by Sidney Nolan of the 1952 Queensland drought
  • Ceremony (1900), a pen-and-ink drawing by Tommy McRae
  • Ian Abdulla’s colourful diptych Living along the River Murray (2008)
  • a tapestry commissioned in honour of Kenneth Myer AC by his siblings and family, woven by the Australian Tapestry Workshop and donated by its foundation.

Many notable Australians were interviewed for the Oral History Collection, including entertainer Julie Anthony, climate scientist Barrie Pittock, politicians Carmen Lawrence, Amanda Vanstone and Bob Hawke, Paralympian swimmer Anne Brunell, adventurer and explorer Colin Putt, 1967 Referendum activist Uncle Ray Peckham and Chief Justice Murray Gleeson.
Australian Generations, a four-year oral history project funded by the Australian Research Council, documented attitudes in Australian society and extended the Library’s partnering and data-sharing capabilities. A new project was commissioned to elicit opinions and views of people affected by coal seam gas mining.

Noteworthy acquisitions for the Maps Collection included:

  • two pairs of celestial/terrestrial floor globes, manufactured by J. & W. Cary, showing the period of charting immediately after James Cook and Matthew Flinders
  • Indiae Orientalis nova descriptio, published by the Dutch firm Jansson in 1630, the earliest map covering south-east Asia to include traces of Willem Jansz’s 1605 
  • Duyfken voyage
  • a consignment of 600 sales plans, parish maps and allotment drawings from the 1840to the1880s, mainly of southern New South Wales and Victoria
  • several important declassified map series relating to Australian military, peacekeeping and humanitarian activities over the past 20 years, including topographic maps of EastTimor and mapping used by Australian personnel during a United Nations operation in Somalia.

Annual Report - Glossary and Indexes

Annual Report - Glossary

TermDefinition
Balanced ScorecardA strategic management tool
gigabyte1,000 megabytes of data storage capacity
Libraries AustraliaA service providing information about items held by Australian libraries, used by Australian libraries for automated cataloguing
and inter-lending; see librariesaustralia.nla.gov.au
logarithmic scalingA scale of measurement in which equal distances on the scale represent equal ratios of increase (for example, with logarithmic scale to the base of 10, the numbers 10, 100 and 1,000 are shown separately by equal distances on the graph)
outcomesThe results, impacts or consequences of actions by the Australian Government on the Australian community
PANDORA:
Australia’s Web Archive
A web archive established by the Library in 1996; see pandora.
nla.gov.au
performanceThe proficiency of an agency or authority in acquiring resources economically and using those resources efficiently and effectively in achieving planned outcomes
performance targetsQuantifiable performance levels or changes in level to be attained by a specific date
petabyte1,000 terabytes
qualityRelates to the characteristics by which customers or stakeholders judge an organisation, product or service
reference serviceServices provided by the Library that assist users to understand and navigate the information environment to pursue independent self-directed research
Reimagining LibrariesAn initiative of National and State Libraries Australasia, in which the Library is working with the state and territory libraries and the National Library of New Zealand to transform its library services to better meet user needs in the digital age
terabyte1,000 gigabytes of data storage capacity
TroveA national discovery service implemented by the Library in November 2009, providing a single point of access to a wide range of traditional and digital content from Australian collections and global information sources

Annual Report - Shortened Forms

AbbreviationTerm
AASBAustralian Accounting Standards Board
ANBDAustralian National Bibliographic Database
APIapplication programming interface
APSAustralian Public Service
CAC ActCommonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997
CSSCommonwealth Superannuation Scheme
CDNLConference of Directors of National Libraries
CMGCorporate Management Group
DLIRDigital Library Infrastructure Replacement
EAEnterprise Agreement
EAPEnvironmental Action Plan
ERAElectronic Resources Australia
FBTfringe benefits tax
FMOsFinance Minister’s Orders
FOI ActFreedom of Information Act 1982
GSTgoods and services tax
IFLAInternational Federation of Library Associations
ILMSIntegrated Library Management System
IPSInformation Publication Scheme
ITinformation technology
NLANational Library of Australia
NSLANational and State Libraries Australasia
ONIXOnline Information eXchange
PSSPublic Sector Superannuation Scheme
PSSapPSS accumulation plan
RDAResource Description and Access
SESsenior executive staff
WHSwork health and safety

Annual Report - Compliance Index

This report complies with the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 issued by the Minister for Finance and Deregulation on 22 September 2011.

RequirementPage
Enabling legislation 19
Responsible Minister 19
Ministerial directions 26
Other statutory requirements:
  • Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918
  • Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
  • Work Health and Safety Act 2011

31
41
36–38
Information about directors125–127
Organisational structure20
Statement on governance21–24
Key activities and changes affecting the authority 5–9
Judicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies 26
Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers 27

While not required of statutory authorities, this report also selectively complies with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Requirements for Annual Reports approved on 28 June 2012 by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsections 63(2) and 70(2) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Requirement Page 
Asset management 39–40
Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines34
Consultants31, 134–135
Financial statements72–120
Freedom of information26–27
Grant programs42–43
Purchasing42
WHS36–38