Annual Report 2012 - 2013

Introduction

Chair’s Report

National Library of Australia Council Chair Mr Ryan Stokes    Ryan Stokes

At the conclusion of my first year as Chair of the National Library of Australia Council, I am pleased to be able to share with you some of the Library’s notable achievements in 2012–13, and to report on progress towards broadening the Library’s reach through new technologies and its expanding digital collections.

Maintaining Australia’s documentary heritage through the Library’s collection and preservation work remains a high priority. The Library is well positioned to continue to serve its users through the reading rooms of its wonderful building, and to expand its reach to the wider community and overseas users through its digital infrastructure.

Use of the Library’s electronic journals and ebooks is steadily increasing, reflecting users’ preference for accessing online resources. This trend underlines the importance of the Library’s continued investment in making more titles available via new technology.

In October last year, the Library’s Council endorsed a collecting policy for overseas publications that places priority on online resources and reaffirms the Asia–Pacific region as a priority collecting area.

During 2012–13, staff also developed strategies for collecting online versions of Australian publications in digital form where there is a choice between printed and online versions. To support this, priority has been given to working with the Attorney-General’s Department and publishers to amend the legal deposit provisions of the Copyright Act 1968. The year has been one of discussion and negotiation, and Council is keen to see legislative change achieved in 2013–14.

The significant role in information discovery played by the Library’s Trove service was recognised in October 2012 with the Australian and New Zealand Internet Award for Innovation. Use of the service continues to grow strongly, with more than 60,000 daily visits confirming Trove as the primary vehicle for users engaging with the Library. Two-thirds of Trove’s content is available online, with a third of this being freely available to all users.

Digitised newspapers continue to be the most popular content in Trove, with over 10 million newspaper pages available online. During the reporting year, 1.1 million pages of newspaper titles were digitised as part of a funding agreement extending to mid-2016 with the State Library of New South Wales. The digitisation of 18,000 historic glass plate negatives from the Fairfax Media archive also commenced, following the receipt of a grant from the National Cultural Heritage Account. In addition, the Library has improved access to its important Oral History and Folklore Collection by putting it online, synchronised with text from summaries and transcripts.

In order to support its growing digital collections, the Library has commenced a multi-year project to replace its digital infrastructure. The Library is now working with two companies, following an open-market procurement process.

The Library welcomed the release of the Australian Government’s National Cultural Policy, Creative Australia, and the objectives that have been identified to develop and support the arts. The Library is proud of the recognition this policy accords to Trove as a great example of new technology initiatives and effective collaboration in the arts.

In November 2012, the Library marked the anniversary of the Treasures Gallery, which has received over 170,000 visitors since opening to the public in 2011. This event provided an opportunity for the announcement of the James and Bettison Treasures Curatorship, a privately funded position to promote the Library’s collections to a broad range of users and supporters.

Over the past six months, the Library has also been celebrating the Centenary of Canberra. This has involved a diverse set of activities, including a project to digitise The Canberra Times; an event to recognise the contribution of women to Canberra’s development; and an exhibition, The Dream of a Century: The Griffins in Australia’s Capital, focusing on the lives and work of Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin.

I would like to acknowledge the contribution of my fellow Council members: the Hon. Dick Adams MP, Ms Glenys Beauchamp PSM, Ms Jane Hemstritch, Senator Gary Humphries, Dr Nonja Peters, Professor Janice Reid AM, Ms Deborah Thomas, the Hon. Mary Delahunty and Dr Nicholas Gruen, along with Mr Brian Long and Ms Mary Kostakidis who both retired from Council during the year.

We acknowledge Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich, the Director General of the Library, for her leadership through the year, together with her Corporate Management Group and all the Library staff whose dedicated work and commitment ensure the Library fulfils its role of preserving and making available this important material.

Signature of Mr Ryan Stokes Chair of the National Library of Australia Council

Ryan Stokes

Director General’s Review

Portrait of the National Library of Australia's Director General Anne-Marie Schwirtlich   Anne-Marie Schwirtlich

The National Library has made notable progress in advancing its Strategic Directions for 2012–14, which focus on developing the national collection, promoting access and engaging audiences, collaboration and leadership, and achieving organisational excellence.

The Library shapes its strategic thinking with reference to its broader context. Over the course of the reporting year, the Library has monitored developments in the policy environment, trends in use and information-seeking behaviour, and changes in the digital domain. Examples of developments that will affect the Library’s work are Creative Australia, the Australian Government's National Cultural Policy; the Australian Law Reform Commission’s Inquiry into Copyright and the Digital Economy; the Australian Government's Australia in the Asian Century White Paper; and proposed changes to government financial accountability and online security frameworks.

As the publishing world adopts digital business models, the Library has also sought to develop more robust workflows and systems to enable it to collect, preserve, digitise and provide access to an increasing number of online resources. In October, following a rigorous procurement process, the preferred tenderers for elements of the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project were approved, after which the Library conducted extensive system testing. The first phase of implementation began early in 2013, and will enable the digitisation, management and delivery of published books and journals in the Library’s collections and support the bit-level preservation of the Library’s digital collections. This complex project is scheduled for completion in mid-2016.

Following a review of its overseas collecting during 2011–12, the Library issued its revised Overseas Collection Development Policy in February 2013. This policy outlines the principles and general collecting strategy for the Library’s Asian, Pacific and other overseas collections. It also confirms the Library’s support for its Asian and Pacific collecting programs. In response to the changing environment, the Library has begun the transition from a print-based collecting model to a digital library model. As a result, the Library has begun cancelling overseas printed journals and either subscribing to their online equivalents or, if their use is low, ceasing subscriptions in order to direct funds to the digitisation of Australian collections.

The Chair has welcomed the Australian Government’s commitment, expressed in the National Cultural Policy, to extend the legal deposit provisions to ensure that material published in digital form can be preserved by the Library. To prepare for this vital amendment to the Copyright Act, Library staff participated in a series of consultations with publishers during the year to explore and resolve issues raised in submissions to the Attorney-General’s discussion paper, Extending Legal Deposit. Questions ranged from how library material would be defined in an online environment and the extent of public access, to what the compliance obligations for publishers might be. The Library subsequently prepared information to assist publishers understand and comply with any future requirements for delivery of online and offline electronic materials. Should legal deposit arrangements be extended to include digitally published material, the Library will work closely with publishers to ensure these new arrangements are implemented smoothly.

Legal deposit for digital material is essential to the Library’s fundamental work of developing the national collection. For the foreseeable future, the Library will be collecting both paper-based and digital material, and 2012–13 has seen remarkable additions to the national collection, many of which are highlighted in Appendix J.

After a decade of planning by major national libraries, during which the Library’s staff made a significant contribution, the international cataloguing rules have been revised to enable libraries to describe and manage their digital collections. In 2012, the Library prioritised development and delivery of training programs to enable Australian implementation of the new rules—Resource Description and Access, or RDA—in 2013. In April, following intensive training of its own staff, the Library successfully adopted the new international cataloguing standard in all new record creation work. As part of its leadership role, the Library has also identified changes to library systems and workflows that will assist the Australian library sector as it implements the first major change in cataloguing standards in 40 years.

The Library continued to add significant content—in particular, digitised Australian newspapers—to its highly popular online service, Trove. Through Trove, people can access content held by the Library and collecting institutions across Australia. In November, the Library signed a memorandum of understanding with the State Library of New South Wales to digitise 6 million newspaper pages and deliver them on Trove over the following four years. The newspaper digitisation program continued to attract other contributors as well. Forty-one libraries and organisations contributed funding to digitise more than 300,000 pages from 49 Australian newspapers.

Use of Trove rose steeply during 2012–13. By June, Trove had an average of more than 60,000 daily visits, with a peak of almost 80,000—nearly double the usage recorded for the previous year. Users are increasingly accessing Trove content and services on mobile devices, with more than 17 per cent of all use being via smart phones and tablets. Trove has a national reach, with use in each Australian state and territory closely matching their populations. It is also a service used around the world, with more than 40 per cent of users being residents of other countries. While visitors from the United Kingdom and the United States of America dominate, Trove receives visits from many Asian countries as well.

Trove’s success is gratifying, although its popularity, growing content and burgeoning user base place significant pressure on its infrastructure. As a consequence, the Library is redeveloping Trove’s newspaper service to improve the online interface and performance. This development will be delivered by August 2013.

Although newspapers constitute the majority of the Library’s digitised collection material, important material in other formats is also digitised. The Fairfax Archive Glass Plate Collection was donated to the Library by Fairfax Media at a ceremony in Sydney in December. Funding from the Australian Government’s National Cultural Heritage Account is enabling the Library to preserve, catalogue and digitise the 18,000 photographic negatives, with the project scheduled to be completed in December 2013.

The Library’s Oral History and Folklore Collection includes over 42,000 hours of recordings dating from the 1950s, with 1,000 hours of new interviews added each year. The Library developed an innovative way of making audio holdings available online, enabling the relevant portion of an interview to be found rapidly, matched to text in its transcript or timed summary. This new service has dramatically improved the accessibility of the collection.

While the Library’s notable success in providing digital services is evident, the importance of the Library as a physical venue cannot be underestimated. The Library remains the place to consult the overwhelming majority of the collection that is in paper form (or in digital form that, for reasons of licensing or other agreements, must be consulted onsite), as well as to enjoy exhibitions and participate in events and learning programs. The Library takes great pride in the services provided in its landmark building.

Last year’s Annual Report foreshadowed the need to improve reading room facilities to meet the changing requirements and expectations of twenty-first-century library users. In the second half of 2012, the Library began analysis, consultation and initial feasibility work on a project to integrate reading rooms. The project proposes moving the Newspapers and Microforms Reading Room from the lower ground floor to integrate it with the Main Reading Room on the ground floor, and to integrate the Petherick, Maps, and Pictures and Manuscripts reading rooms on the first floor. The objective, in line with the Strategic Building Master Plan, is to create spaces that support learning, knowledge creation and efficient workflows for researchers and Library staff. This modernisation and improvement of facilities and services will also enhance the aesthetic and heritage values of the building. Detailed design work is being completed in anticipation of conducting a tender process for the associated building works in the new financial year.

The Library’s two galleries have established strong identities as venues for thoughtful and varied exhibitions. The Chair’s Report notes the success of the Treasures Gallery, which celebrated its first anniversary in November. The new gallery for temporary exhibitions presented three well-received shows during its first full year of operation: a travelling exhibition from the State Library of New South Wales, Lewin: Wild Art; Things: Photographing the Constructed World; and the first of three Centenary of Canberra exhibitions, The Dream of a Century: The Griffins in Australia’s Capital.

The Library’s Centenary events commenced with a very successful evening in February, celebrating the national contribution of women who have lived and worked in Canberra. With a view to a lasting legacy for the Centenary year, the Library also began the preservation microfilming of Canberra newspaper titles and the digitisation of The Canberra Times issues since 1955, to ensure that Canberra’s history is readily available to future generations.

The depth and diversity of the Library’s collection are reflected in its publishing program. Canberra Then and Now, published to commemorate the Centenary, compares historic images from the collection with their modern-day equivalents captured by staff photographers. Other new titles include Flying the Southern Cross: Aviators Charles Ulm and Charles Kingsford Smith; In Search of Beauty: Hilda Rix Nicholas’ Sketchbook Art; John Gould’s Extinct and Endangered Birds of Australia; and Eucalypt Flowers.

Several titles received national recognition. Amazing Grace: An Adventure at Sea by Stephanie Owen Reeder was awarded the New South Wales Premier’s Young People’s History Prize; Shy the Platypus by Leslie Rees and Dymphna Rees Petersen and Australian Backyard Naturalist by Peter Macinnis received Whitley Awards from the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales in the Children’s Story and Young Naturalist categories respectively; and Wolfgang Sievers by Helen Ennis was highly commended in the Museums Australia Multimedia and Publication Design Awards.

Changed public car-parking arrangements in areas adjacent to the Library, including the removal of over 300 long-stay spaces with the restitution of the Patrick White Lawns, are causing difficulties for visitors and impacting on some services. As part of the Commonwealth 2013–14 Budget, the Government announced the proposed introduction of pay parking in the area—an approach designed, in part, to help improve access to the cultural institutions. The Library looks forward to working with the National Capital Authority and other institutions in the Parliamentary Zone to help resolve the issues.

The Friends of the National Library continued to promote the Library through a diverse program of events and activities. These included the 2012 Kenneth Myer Lecture, delivered in August by Mr Kerry O’Brien, on the topic ‘In an Age of Information, How Easily We Forget the Past’; and an event in October celebrating Ms Hilary McPhee’s contribution to writing and publishing.

Highlights of the Library’s own busy events program included a ‘Meet the Winners’ celebration held in conjunction with the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards; the Seymour Biography Lecture delivered by Professor Jeffrey Meyers; participation in many National Year of Reading events; collaboration with the late Mr Bryce Courtenay on two writing master classes; and the Ray Mathew Lecture delivered by Australian author, Mr Peter Robb.

Over decades, the Library has been the fortunate beneficiary of financial support and collection donations, and it works with purpose to build the relationships from which such generosity flows. The Library’s Bequest Program was formalised during the year and documentation prepared for potential bequest benefactors.

Considerable effort has been devoted to raising funds to support the major international exhibition, Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia, which will open in November. The Library is delighted to have gained the support of Shell as principal sponsor. In addition, it is grateful to Etihad Airways and Virgin Australia for their commitment to support travel for couriers and freight requirements; to Australian Capital Equity, Esri Australia, Planet Wheeler Foundation and Channel 7 as cash and in-kind supporters; and to Crowne Plaza, Canberra and TOGA Hotels, which will accommodate couriers and representatives of institutional lenders. The loan of the Fra Mauro Map of the World to the exhibition has been generously supported by Mr Kerry Stokes AC, Associate Professor Noel Dan AM and Mrs Adrienne Dan, Mr Nigel Peck AM and Mrs Patricia Peck, Mr Douglas and Mrs Belinda Snedden, and the Embassy of Italy in Canberra. The Library also welcomes the financial generosity of Mr Kevin McCann AM and Deidre Mcann, Macquarie Foundation and Origin Energy Foundation.

The Library’s annual fundraising appeal was very successful. So also were two fundraising dinners held in Sydney and Melbourne, to gain support for the preservation and digitisation of an important collection of panoramic photographs, and for an early Australian atlas. Following the Sydney dinner, a significant pledge was received from a foundation to assist the Library with its educational work.

Collaboration with institutions in Australia and overseas is a hallmark of the Library’s culture. The Libraries Australia Search service—which meets the collection management needs of more than 1,200 member libraries—was redeveloped during the year, and will be released to members during the second half of 2013–14. The new platform will deliver improved capacity and performance, together with a refreshed and more usable online interface.

A senior delegation from the National Library of China led by the Director, Mr Zhou Heping, was welcomed in December, and a memorandum of understanding was signed between the two libraries. In May, colleagues from the National Library of Malaysia visited, to learn about the implementation of Resource Description and Access in Australia.

The Library has continued its efforts to achieve Reimagining Libraries, the vision of National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA). Library staff have led and contributed actively to NSLA groups, working on a range of strategic priorities to improve and harmonise public access to collections and services. During the year, issues on which groups collaborated included the preservation of digital heritage, the implications and challenges of digital collecting, and the accessibility of large pictures and map collections—all with the aim of benefiting library users for generations to come.

Collaboration can also enrich the collection, and two notable examples are testament to this. The Forgotten Australians and Former Child Migrants oral history project—a three-year project funded by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs—was concluded formally in November with a ceremony at the Library and the launch of a commemorative booklet. This project recorded over 200 interviews with those who experienced institutional life as children, policy makers, employees of children’s homes and advocates. In the second notable example, the Library and the Australia–China Council at the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade initiated a project to track the history of 40 years of Australia–China diplomatic engagement through the eyes of Australian ambassadors. This oral history project, Beyond the Cables: Australian Ambassadors to China 1972–2012, aims to produce extended interviews with Australia’s former and current ambassadors to China.

As it enters its nineteenth year, the Community Heritage Grants program continues to be an important source of support for community groups. The program is managed by the Library on behalf of funding partners, including the Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport; the National Archives of Australia; the National Museum of Australia; and the National Film and Sound Archive. Grants of up to $15,000 are awarded to libraries, archives, museums, genealogical and historical societies, and multicultural and Indigenous groups. In 2012, 181 applications were received for Community Heritage Grants. Of these, 78 organisations received grants averaging $5,500. Thirty-two first-time awardees received their awards from Minister for the Arts, the Hon. Simon Crean MP, on 30 October. The 2013 grant round closed on 1 May and received 125 applications.

The Library’s Strategic Workforce Plan (2012–2014) identifies three priorities aimed at focusing the Library’s decisions and resources, particularly as they relate to the increasing workforce demand for digital competencies and technological confidence. During the year, the Library reinvigorated the mentoring program, and developed core leadership capabilities and a related leadership model. A diversity work-experience program was also developed, together with a reflective senior leadership forum to assist with career sustainability and to help deliver major strategic initiatives and projects across the Library.

In response to the changing digital environment, a process to identify potential workforce gaps began. This will be followed by a review of initiatives across similar institutions.

Over the course of the year, the Library consolidated its work health and safety systems and processes. Documentation for the Work Health and Safety Management System is designed for easy access and application across all functional areas, with users being able to select a specific procedure relevant to their particular task.

The Library completed the first stage of a project to increase the energy efficiency of lighting in stacks and office areas, covering 15 per cent of the main building. The Library is also assessing the potential benefits of installing a solar plant on its repository building at Hume, where a year-long trial aimed at maintaining appropriate temperature and humidity levels without air-conditioning has already proved successful. In December, the Library was pleased to achieve accreditation with the ACTSmart Office Recycling program, with the final audit showing a significant reduction in waste to landfill of 35 per cent (or 3 tonnes per month).

This report provides me with a welcome opportunity to thank the Library’s Council, volunteers, Friends, members of the Foundation Board, donors and partners. The generosity with which they contribute their time, energy, goodwill and expertise to the Library is inspiring.

It is with gratitude that I also note the counsel received from colleagues in the department, which was, as always, immensely useful.

The Library is conscious of the significant challenges it faces. These include the need to invest heavily in technology and systems development to support digital library services, to identify a cost-effective solution to long-term storage needs, and to manage a decline in external revenue.

Nonetheless, in the coming year the Library will advance its strategic directions, appreciative of the supplementation for national collecting institutions that was announced in the 2012–13 Commonwealth Budget. To ensure that Australians can access, enjoy and learn from a national collection that documents Australian life and society, the Library will progress its work on the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project; press and prepare for the extension of legal deposit; develop a sustainable business model for Trove; complete the design and tender phase and commence construction of a specialist reading room which will bring together services to researchers using original materials including maps, pictures, manuscripts and rare books; conclude its program to celebrate the Centenary of Canberra; maintain its digitisation program; assess options for a new Integrated Library Management System; and present the major international exhibition, Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia.

Staff of the National Library take pride in advancing the institution’s role in supporting learning, scholarship, curiosity and cultural life. They pursue vital long-term goals with intelligence, innovation and industry, conscious of the extraordinary legacy of which they are stewards. The pages ahead tell the story.

Director General Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich's signature

Anne-Marie Schwirtlich

Summary of Financial Performance

Operating Outcome

During 2012–13, income, including revenue from Government, amounted to $65.700 million and expenses were $75.255 million, resulting in a deficit of $9.555 million. From an income-statement perspective, the Library does not receive appropriation funding for depreciation of the national collection (totalling $12.359 million), which forms part of operating expenses. Government funding for the purchase of collection material is provided through an equity injection totalling $9.832 million.

Income

The total income of $65.700 million for 2012–13 was $3.233 million above budget and compares to total actual income of $66.616 million for 2011–12. Figure 1.1 shows a comparison of income across items against budget for 2012–13 and 2011–12.

Figure 1.1: Income, 2012–13 and 2011–12

Figure1.1: A horizontal bar graph with a logarithmic x axis showing the National Library of Australia's actual and budgeted income for 2011-2013

                          Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

The major variations between financial years relate to increases in the sales of goods and services ($1.262 million) largely due to an increase in revenue received from digitising other library collections, reduction in interest revenue largely as the result of a decline in deposit interest rates ($0.557 million), reduction in other revenue ($2.284 million) largely due to reductions in the receipt of collection material at no cost ($0.820 million), grants ($0.455 million) and donation revenue ($0.823 million), and an increase in revenue from Government ($0.663 million). The decline in collection material received at no cost is partly due to a high-value item being received in 2011–12; the decline in grants received reflects the receipt of a large Government grant ($0.385 million) in 2011–12 to assist with the digitisation of a photographic collection; and the decline in donation revenue reflects the receipt of a large bequest ($1.100 million) in 2011–12.

Expenses

The total expenses of $75.255 million for 2012–13 were $0.766 million above budget and $1.185 million less than 2011–12. Figure 1.2 shows a comparison of expenditure across items and against budget for 2012–13 and 2011–12.

Figure 1.2: Expenses, 2012–13 and 2011–12

Figure1.1: A horizontal bar graph with a logarithmic x axis showing the National Library of Australia's actual and budgeted income for 2011-2013

                         Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

There was a minor decrease in employee expenses of $0.116 million compared to the 2011–12 financial year.

Supplier expenses were lower ($1.711 million) than in 2011–12. This was largely due to a decline in the cost of goods sold ($0.158 million) primarily as a reduction in sales through the Library’s Bookshop, reductions ($0.328 million) in the purchase of overseas-sourced magazines, reductions ($0.505 million) in the purchase of non-asset equipment and furniture following a project to acquire workstations in 2011–12, and reduced promotional expenses ($0.655 million) largely associated with major one-off activities undertaken in 2011–12, which included the opening of the Library’s Treasures Gallery and the exhibition, Handwritten: Ten Centuries of Manuscript Treasures from Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin.

Depreciation and amortisation expenses were $0.682 million higher than in 2011–12. The primary reasons for the variation include increased depreciation of plant and equipment ($0.333 million), largely the result of the replacement of existing assets, and additional depreciation for the Library’s collections ($0.335 million) following a revaluation undertaken in June 2012.

Equity

The Library’s total equity increased by $5.682 million to $1,782.213 million in 2012–13. The net increase was a result of an equity injection for collection acquisitions ($9.832 million); a net revaluation increment ($5.405 million) following the revaluation of the Library’s plant and equipment, land and buildings; and the net operating result (–$9.555 million) for 2012–13.

Total Assets

Figure 1.3 shows that the total value of the Library’s assets increased by $6.598 million to $1,800.310 million in 2012–13.

Figure 1.3: Total Assets, 2012–13 and 2011–12

Figure1.3: A Horizontal bar graph with a logarithmic x axis showing the National Library of Australia's actual assets for 2012-2013

                        Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

The increase in non-financial assets ($5.353 million) was largely the result of the revaluation of the Library’s plant and equipment, land and buildings (a net increment of $5.405 million), and the net difference between current-year assets acquisitions, disposals and current-year depreciation expenses (–$0.117 million). In addition, there was an increase in the value of inventories ($0.300 million) and a reduction in the value of prepaid supplier expenses ($0.235 million). The increase in financial assets ($1.245 million) relates primarily to an increase in receivables and accrued revenue ($1.230 million), an increase in cash at bank ($0.163 million), and a reduction in investments ($0.148 million).

Total Liabilities

As Figure 1.4 shows, the Library’s total liabilities increased by $0.916 million from last financial year to $18.097 million.

Figure 1.4: Total Liabilities, 2012–13 and 2011–12

Figure1.4: A Horizontal bar graph with a logarithmic x axis showing the National Library of Australia's total actual liabilities for 2012-2013

                        Note: A logarithmic scale is used.

The changes in liabilities relate to an increase in supplier payables ($0.154 million), employee provisions ($0.395 million), other provisions ($0.070 million) and other payables ($0.308 million), and a decrease in grants payable ($0.011 million).

Cash Flow

In 2012–13, there was a minor increase in the Library’s cash balance, which increased by $0.163 million to $5.606 million as at 30 June 2013. Figure 1.5 shows a comparison of cash flow items for 2012–13 and 2011–12.

Figure 1.5: Net Cash Flow, 2012–13 and 2011–12

Figure1.5: A horizontal bar graph showing the National Library of Australia's actual cash flow for 2012-2013

The increase in net cash from operating activities ($1.191 million) reflects the comments under ‘Income’ and ‘Expenses’. The increase in net cash used by investing activities ($0.300 million) primarily reflects the net movement of funds from investments to cash at bank between years (–$0.430 million), a minor increase in the investment in property, plant and equipment and intangibles ($0.045 million), and an increase in proceeds from the sales of property, plant and equipment ($0.175 million). There was a minor increase in net cash from financing activities between financial years ($0.053 million), as a result of the Library’s equity injection provided by Government to fund collection acquisitions being slightly increased.

Corporate Overview

Role

The functions of the Library are set out in the National Library Act 1960 (section 6). They are:

  1. to maintain and develop a national collection of library material, including a comprehensive collection of library material relating to Australia and the Australian people
  2. to make library material in the national collection available to such persons and institutions, and in such manner and subject to such conditions, as the Council determines, with a view to the most advantageous use of that collection in the national interest
  3. to make available such other services in relation to library matters and library material (including bibliographical services) as the Council thinks fit and, in particular, services for the purposes of:
    • the library of the Parliament
    • the authorities of the Commonwealth
    • the Territories
    • the Agencies (within the meaning of the Public Service Act 1999)
  4. to cooperate in library matters (including the advancement of library science) with authorities or persons, whether in Australia or elsewhere, concerned with library matters.

The Library is one of many agencies within the Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport portfolio with responsibilities for collecting Australian cultural heritage materials and making them available to the Australian public. The Minister for Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport, and Minister for the Arts, the Hon. Simon Crean MP, had responsibility for the Library until 21 March 2013. The Hon. Tony Burke MP was appointed Minister for the Arts on 25 March 2013. The affairs of the Library are conducted by the National Library Council, with the Director General as the executive officer.

Legislation

The Library was established by the National Library Act 1960, which defines the Library’s role, corporate governance and financial management framework. As a Commonwealth statutory authority, the Library is subject to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act), which provides the reporting and accountability framework.

Organisation

The Library’s senior management structure comprises the Director General and six Assistant Directors General.

Figure 2.1 shows the Library’s organisational and senior management structure.

Figure 2.1: Organisational and Senior Management  Structure, 30 June 2013

Figure 2.1 shows the Library’s organisational and senior management structure.

Corporate Governance

Figure 2.2 shows the principal elements of the Library’s corporate governance structure.

Figure 2.2: Corporate Governance Structure, 2012–13

Figure 2.2 shows the key elements of the Library’s corporate governance structure.

Council

The National Library Act provides that a council shall conduct the affairs of the Library. The Council has 12 members, including the Director General, one senator elected by the Senate and one member of the House of Representatives elected by the House.

At 30 June 2013, there were three vacancies on Council. Appendix A lists Council members and their attendance at Council meetings.

In 2012–13, in addition to general administrative, compliance and financial matters, Council considered a range of matters, including:

  • integration of the Library’s reading rooms
  • the Heritage Strategy and Conservation Management Plan
  • the Commonwealth Financial Accountability Review
  • the Overseas Collection Development Policy
  • Library activity during the Centenary of Canberra
  • the activities of the Library’s Foundation Board
  • the Audio Management and Delivery project
  • interlending and document delivery trends
  • relations with Asia (the Australian Government's Australia in the Asian Century White Paper)
  • strategic issues and challenges for Trove
  • budget trend analysis information
  • Council’s evaluation of its performance
  • new acquisitions
  • the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project
  • environmental management.

Council has two advisory committees: the Audit Committee and the Corporate Governance Committee.

Audit Committee

The role of the Audit Committee is to:

  1. support the Library and Council members in complying with their obligations under the CAC Act
  2. provide a forum for communication among Council members, senior managers and internal and external auditors
  3. ensure there is an appropriate ethical climate in the Library, and review policies relating to internal controls and risk management.

The Audit Committee comprises a minimum of three non-executive Council members. Council may appoint external members to the Audit Committee. The Council Chair and Director General also attend meetings. Details of Audit Committee members and meeting attendance can be found at Appendix A.

In 2012–13, the Audit Committee considered a range of matters, including:

  • financial statements for 2011–12
  • Library trust-account disbursements
  • internal assessment of the Audit Committee’s performance
  • review of the Audit Committee’s Role and Charter
  • the internal audit schedule
  • the Australian National Audit Office’s 2012–13 financial statement audit strategy
  • the compliance report (CAC Act)
  • the Strategic Internal Audit Plan, 2013–2014 to 2015–2016
  • the Internal Audit Plan 2013–14
  • internal audits of:
    • Trove post-implementation
    • the rights management system
    • contract management
    • Sales and Promotion, and the Bookshop’s annual stocktake
  • Australian National Audit Office reports and recommendations
  • discussion papers on the Commonwealth Financial Accountability Review
  • health check of the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project
  • reports on legal services, compliance, fraud and ethics, risk management and business continuity, insurance, whistleblower complaints, contract management and training, probity and contract thresholds.

Corporate Governance Committee

The role of the Corporate Governance Committee is to:

  1. evaluate Council’s effectiveness in its corporate governance role
  2. evaluate the Director General’s performance and remuneration
  3. oversee the development of a list of prospective members for appointment to Council, subject to consideration and approval by the Minister.

The Corporate Governance Committee comprises three non-executive Council members (the Chair, the Deputy Chair and the Chair of the Audit Committee) and has the authority to co-opt other non-executive Council members.

Appendix A lists the Corporate Governance Committee members. In February 2013, the Corporate Governance Committee met to consider the results of the 2012 Council Self-evaluation Survey and, in June 2013, it met to discuss the Director General’s performance.

Corporate Management Group

The Corporate Management Group (CMG), consisting of the Director General and the six Senior Executive Service (SES) staff, provides strategic and operational leadership for the Library. In particular, it monitors the achievement of objectives and strategies, oversees budget matters, develops policy, coordinates activities across the organisation and oversees a range of operational issues. CMG meets weekly.

A number of cross-organisational committees advise CMG in areas such as workforce planning, asset management, building works, emergency planning, collection development and management, events and education, exhibitions, and publications.

Corporate Planning Framework

The Balanced Scorecard continues to be the Library’s principal planning support system, facilitating the integration of strategic, operational and budget planning. Since its introduction in 2000–01, the Balanced Scorecard has proved to be a successful performance management tool accepted by staff and other stakeholders. All scorecard achievements, initiatives and targets are reviewed regularly as part of strategic management planning and monitoring processes.

Risk Management Framework

The Library’s Risk Management Framework continues to provide effective tools for identifying, evaluating and responding to risks that may affect the collection, core business functions and resources, staff and visitors and/or strategic decision making.

The Library’s Risk Management Register, which is subject to annual review, is central to this framework. The register lists risks to the Library, as well as risk-reduction strategies. These strategies are managed through established procedures and plans such as the Collection Disaster Plan, the IT Disaster Recovery Plan, the Business Contingency Plan for Critical Building Systems, and the Business Continuity Plan.

Risk management within the Library is overseen by the Library’s Emergency Planning Committee, which is chaired by the Assistant Director General, Corporate Services, and includes SES staff representing all business areas. The committee provides a clear control structure to identify, monitor, respond to and mitigate risks that may affect the Library.

Public Accountability

External and Internal Audit

The Library’s Audit Committee met three times to consider external and internal audit reports.

Australian National Audit Office Reports

During 2012–13, Australian National Audit Office reports containing Auditor-General recommendations that were implemented by the Library were:

  • Information and Communications Technology Security: Management of Portable Storage Devices (No. 18, 2011–12)
  • Records Management in the Australian Public Service (No. 53, 2011–12).

Internal Audit Reports

The Audit Committee considered a number of internal audit reports, as listed here.

Parliamentary Committees and Government Inquiries

The Library made submissions responding to the Attorney-General’s public consultation paper, Extending Legal Deposit, the National Cultural Policy (Creative Australia) Discussion Paper, and the Australian Law Reform Commission’s Inquiry into Copyright and the Digital Economy.

Ministerial Directions

Under section 48A of the CAC Act, the Minister for Finance and Deregulation (Finance Minister) may make a General Policy Order specifying an Australian Government general policy applicable to the Library, provided the Finance Minister is satisfied that the Minister for the Arts has consulted the Library on the application of the policy. No General Policy Orders applying to the Library were made in 2012–13, although Council provided input into a General Policy Order proposing that the Government’s Protective Security Policy Framework apply to agencies operating under the CAC Act. General policies of the Australian Government that apply to the Library under section 28 of the CAC Act are:

  • Foreign Exchange Risk Management Guidelines
  • Australian Government Cost Recovery Guidelines
  • National Code of Practice for the Construction Industry.

Legal Action

A claim was lodged in the ACT Supreme Court in 2003 on behalf of Wagdy Hanna and Associates Pty Ltd, seeking damages for an alleged disclosure of information in respect of a 1996 tender process for one of the Library’s offsite storage facilities. The court proceedings were held in December 2008, with Justice Richard Refshauge reserving his decision. In August 2012, the court found in favour of the Library. The outcome is under appeal by Wagdy Hanna and Associates to the Court of Appeal of the ACT.

Ombudsman

During 2012–13, the Commonwealth Ombudsman did not advise referral of any issues relating to the Library.

Australian Human Rights Commission

A visitor had lodged a complaint in the previous financial year alleging that the Library indirectly discriminated against the person on the grounds of disability. The Library defended the claim and its actions, asserting there had been no discrimination. The matter was resolved during the course of the financial year.

A user lodged a complaint with respect to operation of the Trove website. The complaint was subsequently discontinued by the Commission, as it was held to be misconceived.

Freedom of Information

The Library finalised two requests under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act). One, received on 30 June 2012, was granted, and the second, received in 2012–13, was formally withdrawn.

Agencies subject to the FOI Act are required to publish information as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with IPS requirements. The Library complies with IPS requirements, and a link to the scheme is provided on the Library’s website (nla.gov.au/corporate-documents/information-publication-scheme).

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums

The premiums under the Library’s insurance coverage with Comcover encompass general liability, directors’ and officers’ indemnity, property loss, damage or destruction, business interruption and consequential loss, motor vehicles, personal accidents and official overseas travel.

The Library’s insurance premium attracted an 8 per cent discount as a result of its performance measured by Comcover’s Risk Management Benchmarking Survey. Under the terms of the insurance schedule of cover, the Library may not disclose its insurance premium price.

The Library continued to be represented at the Insurance and Risk Management Corporate Insurance Forum of cultural agencies, which holds regular meetings with Comcover to discuss insurance issues.

Social Justice and Equity

The Library serves a culturally and socially diverse community and aims to make its collection accessible to all. The Library’s collection includes material in over 300 languages. Its programs and services are developed with an emphasis on public accessibility, and adhere to the principles outlined in the Australian Government’s Charter of Public Service in a Culturally Diverse Community. The Library is conscientiously implementing the charter, and seeks to provide all Australians with the opportunity to access documentary resources of national significance. In particular, during 2012–13, the Library:

  • provided an introductory program to 201 international students of non-English-speaking backgrounds
  • provided exhibition and education tours for adults and young people with special needs, and senior citizens groups
  • supported community projects, including the National Year of Reading, National Reconciliation Week, the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, National Simultaneous Storytime, Children’s Book Week, Get Reading!, and Libraries and Information Week
  • supported the development of youth arts activities through events and education programs
  • provided remote interactive Trove training and assistance to Australians in metropolitan, regional and rural areas
  • conducted oral history interviews with people regarding their experience of polio, with Paralympians, and with activists for Indigenous rights reflecting on the 1967 referendum
  • acquired artworks and photographs documenting aspects of the Indigenous experience, including a self-portrait by internationally recognised Indigenous photographer Tracey Moffat, and a series of 25 photographs by Darren Clark focusing on Indigenous communities in Gunbalanya (Oenpelli), Tennant Creek and Alice Springs
  • using a staff photographer, documented Bengali New Year celebrations held at Olympic Park in Sydney, which drew crowds of over 10,000 people
  • acquired artist Jeannie Baker’s collages for her children’s book, Mirror, which portrays parallel stories of the family life of two boys: one living in inner Sydney and the other in a village in Morocco
  • acquired papers of Professor Janice Reid relating to effects of torture and imprisonment on refugees, and the establishment of the NSW Service for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture and Trauma Survivors
  • continued to offer a range of assistive technologies in the reading rooms to help people with sight, hearing or mobility impairments to access services and collections
  • provided an ongoing customer service training program for front-of-house staff, including training in mental health awareness
  • following staff participation in a workshop conducted by the Family History Unit of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, hosted a reciprocal visit for Institute staff.

Service Charter

The Library’s Service Charter sets out its commitment to users, the standards of service that users can expect, and the mechanisms for providing feedback or making a complaint.

Revised in 2011–12, the Service Charter is available online (nla.gov.au/service-charter) and as a print publication.

During 2012–13, the Service Charter standards were met as follows:

  • 97.5 per cent of general reference inquiries were answered within standards (target 90 per cent)
  • 94.7 per cent of collection items were delivered within standards and timeframes (target 90 per cent)
  • the Library’s website was available 24 hours a day for 98.9 per cent of the time (target 99.5 per cent).

The Library welcomes feedback and suggestions for service improvements. Feedback forms are placed throughout the Library and on the website (nla.gov.au/feedback). During the financial year, 222 formal compliments and 107 formal complaints were received from users, as indicated in Tables 2.1 and 2.2 respectively.

Table 2.1: Compliments Received, 2012–13

Compliments Received, 2012–13

Subject

Number

Nature

Information and online services to individuals

192

  • Quality, professionalism, responsiveness and dedication of staff
  • Quality and speed of response to inquiries and delivery of collection material
  • Quality of reproduction services
  • Quality of website
  • Trove

Public Programs activities

17

  • Quality of tours and support for educational visits
  • Quality of events program
  • Quality of publications
  • Quality of galleries and exhibitions
  • Quality of volunteer-led tours

Facilities and support

13

  • Quality of food services
  • Quality of support for events

Total

222

 

In addition, several hundred informal compliments were received from users of the Library’s Trove, Copies Direct and reading room services. The number of compliments received was 36 fewer than in 2011–12.

Table 2.2: Complaints Received, 2012–13

Subject

Number

Nature

The collection

6

  • Cataloguing information for collection material
  • Collecting of digital format material
  • Online access to collection material

Information and online services to individuals

55
  • Use of mobile phones by Library users
  • Wireless connectivity problems and slow response times
  • Access to e-resources
  • Use of new photocopiers
  • Delays, misunderstandings and perceived lack of assistance relating to requesting/receiving and discharging material
  • Reader registration processing
  • Copying and inter-library lending fees

Public Programs activities

3

  • Content and display of exhibitions

Facilities and support

43

  • Car-parking availability
  • Bag restrictions in reading rooms
  • Cloaking arrangements

Total

107

 

The Library provided explanations and/or apologies in response to all complaints, and undertook remedial action to address them as appropriate. Complaints relating to car parking were referred to the National Capital Authority as the responsible body. The number of complaints received was 19 fewer than in 2011–12.

Consultancy Services

The Library entered into 30 new consultancy contracts during 2012–13 involving total actual expenditure of $1,028,407 (inclusive of GST) during this financial year. Appendix E lists the new consultancies with an individual value of $10,000 or more. The most significant of the new consultancies involved the design and superintendence of the Reading Room Integration project. There were also 14 ongoing consultancy contracts that were active during the same period, involving total actual expenditure of $316,127, bringing the total level of expenditure on consultancy contracts in 2012–13 to $1,344,535.

Advertising and Market Research

Advertising and market research in excess of $12,100 for non-recruitment and non-tender services amounted to $60,448 (inclusive of GST). This work, contracted to Adcorp Australia Ltd, was for newspaper advertising promoting the Library.

Corporate Management

The Library’s corporate management activities aim to maximise service to clients by realising the full potential of staff and other available resources. Major activities during the financial year focused on implementing the Strategic Workforce Plan, the Strategic Building Master Plan, and the Work Health and Safety and Environmental Management systems. Through participation in the Corporate Management Forum and related subcommittees, the Library also played a part in corporate management across other collecting and portfolio agencies, displaying a supportive, collaborative and cooperative working style to other organisations.

People Management

People management is an important priority for the Library. Progress on related initiatives is reported below and in the Report of Operations section under Strategic Direction Four: Achieve Organisational Excellence.

The Library develops a Strategic Workforce Plan triennially. In this reporting period, the Library’s Strategic Workforce Plan (2012–2014) progressed to its second year. The plan identifies three priorities aimed at focusing the Library’s decisions and resources, particularly taking account of the increasing workforce demand for digital competencies and technological confidence. The three priority areas are:

  • Priority area one: Leverage and build internal capability to be ready for the future
  • Priority area two: Build responsiveness to change and to new and emerging digital opportunities
  • Priority area three: Cultivate operational and career sustainability, and a diverse workforce.

Each priority area has defined strategies and initiatives for implementation.

The Library participates in the annual census conducted by the Australian Public Service Commission. The results from the 2011–12 census were received in this financial year. The overall results for the Library were positive, demonstrating an ongoing satisfaction with the working environment, although two major issues were identified relating to career development and remuneration. While there has been a strong focus on addressing the former, the latter remains a challenge and will need to be considered in future enterprise-bargaining frameworks.

The Library introduced new reports to monitor selected workforce data, and trialled the gathering of workforce planning data from other state and territory libraries and selected collecting institutions, in order to develop industry-specific indicators. This industry data, coupled with data from the annual census, is being used regularly to monitor and compare organisational performance on strategic workforce issues.

Staff Engagement

With the Library’s Enterprise Agreement negotiated and implemented in the previous year, the Consultative Committee proved to be the major vehicle through which staff engage with management via divisional and union representatives. The committee progressed some post-Agreement issues, such as the development of a new Grievance Resolution Policy and Process, and a review of the Travel Policy. In addition, the committee considered:

  • energy and environmental management
  • parking arrangements in the Parliamentary Zone
  • a review of IT client support services
  • prevention strategies for bullying and harassment
  • the number of Individual Flexibility Arrangements whereby individual staff members have enhanced employment conditions.

Remuneration

In accordance with the Australian Government’s regime for Principal Executive Officers, Council determines the Director General’s remuneration.

At 30 June 2013, terms and conditions of employment for SES staff, such as non-salary benefits including access to motor vehicles and mobile phones, continued under common law contract.

At 30 June 2013, eight non-SES staff had enhanced benefits through Individual Flexibility Arrangements.

Table 2.3 shows the salary ranges for classifications below SES level and the number of employees at each level.

Table 2.3: Salary Ranges below SES Level and Number of Employees, 30 June 2013

Classification

Salary Range ($)

Employees (no.)

EL 2

114,196–139,842

24

EL 1

92,686–116,697

76

APS 6

73,954–83,226

84

APS 5

65,523–69,845

79

APS 4

58,882–63,579

96

Graduate

53,608–63,579

2

APS 3

53,608–57,903

75

APS 2

46,296–52,490

43

APS 1

40,283–44,523

0

Cadet

13,776–40,283

0

 

All ongoing and long-term non-ongoing staff were required to participate in the Performance Management Framework, with pay-point progression subject to achieving a satisfactory rating.

Risk Assessment and Control

The Library is committed to the prevention of fraud, and works to minimise the risk of fraud in the workplace.

The Library is required to examine and update its Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan every two years; this review was completed in 2011–12. In accordance with the Library’s Fraud Management Policy, staff must be aware of their responsibilities in relation to fraud against the Commonwealth. Fraud awareness training is required to be undertaken by all Library staff and, during 2012–13, training sessions were made available to new staff and to staff who had not attended such training in the past four years. A new online module on fraud prevention and ethics responsibilities was also developed.

Fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures are in place. These, along with the Fraud Risk Assessment and Fraud Control Plan, meet the Library’s needs and comply with Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

Ethical Standards

The Library promotes and endorses the ethical behaviour of its employees by informing staff of their responsibilities, including the Australian Public Service (APS) Values and Code of Conduct. This is achieved through:

  • references in the Enterprise Agreement
  • completion by new employees of an online induction program, which includes an APS Values and Code of Conduct module
  • regular review and feedback under the Library’s Performance Management Framework
  • mandatory participation in fraud and ethics awareness training
  • provision of information about the Australian Public Service Commission’s Ethics Advisory Service
  • supporting policies and procedures, such as the whistleblowing and fraud awareness policies
  • clearly identified channels and support networks through which employees can raise matters of concern.

Staff have been advised of relevant changes to the Public Service Act that will take effect on 1 July 2013.

Disability Strategy

The Library remains committed to the principles of the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020, and continues to focus on improving access for people with disability to employment, programs, services and facilities.

A Disability Framework has been developed, integrating disability access issues into existing strategic and business planning processes. The principal elements of the framework include:

  • providing access to information and services
  • providing access to employment
  • purchasing accessible services
  • recognising people with disability as consumers of services
  • consulting people with disability about their needs.

These elements provide the platform for continuing developments in reader and visitor services, collections management, and building and security services.

During the year, the Library advanced the Disability Framework by appointing Disability Contact Officers to represent and advocate for clients and staff with disabilities.

In its two major projects—Reading Room Integration focusing on onsite services, and Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement focusing on online services—special consideration is being given to ensure that the needs of people with disability will be met.

In 2012–13, new wheelchair access was provided in the Theatre, to ensure that speakers requiring wheelchair access can reach the stage easily.

Workplace Diversity

The Library took steps to improve workforce participation by Indigenous people. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Working Group began developing a strategy and is considering a range of initiatives related to the employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The Library hosted Indigenous work-experience students through the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations’ Learn Earn Legend! program. Two graduates from the APS Indigenous Pathways program were also engaged in 2013, which has resulted in a modest increase in the number of Indigenous staff.

As part of the initiatives from the Strategic Workforce Plan 2012–2014, the Library has launched a new program that focuses on work-experience opportunities for students from an Indigenous background or with disability.

Staff with disability are encouraged to seek assistance through ‘reasonable adjustment’, an approach that also strengthens the Library’s reputation as a respectful and inclusive workplace.

The Mature Age Staff Strategy, retirement planning and transition-to-retirement strategies are actively promoted by the Library.

As at 30 June 2013, 70 per cent of staff were female and 22 per cent of staff identified as being from a culturally and linguistically diverse background. However, only 1.4 per cent identified as Indigenous, and 6 per cent identified a disability. The Library is continuing to work on initiatives to improve representation in these latter two groups.

Work Health and Safety

The Library completed a review of its Work Health and Safety Risk Register in April 2013, to ensure risk levels were commensurate with actual hazard and that resource allocation was similarly aligned to the Library’s risk profile. At the same time, a restructure of the risk register was completed, which saw Library-wide risks being aggregated into one generic register. This has streamlined the six-monthly re-evaluation of hazards.

In April, the Library reviewed its chemical storage and handling, as a precursor to a broader review of its work health and safety systems. The results of the chemical storage review led to the Library culling a significant proportion of its chemical holdings. The review also found that the databases used to register dangerous goods and hazardous substances were well maintained, and that the risks associated with the few potentially toxic chemicals used in collection preservation were managed correctly and well within the legislative guidelines for storage and handling.

Training courses in work health and safety offered during the year included:

  • Senior First Aid
  • First Aid Certificate
  • Health and Safety Representation
  • Reframe and Refocus: Building Resilience
  • Assertiveness and Self-confidence.

Seminars on work health and safety topics included:

  • Heart Foundation Presentation
  • Men’s Health
  • Women’s Health
  • Breast Awareness
  • The Difference between Weight Loss and Fat Loss
  • Healthy Eating.

The Library again offered onsite flu vaccinations, with 180 Library staff taking up the offer.

The Library’s work health and safety statistics are presented in Table 2.4.

Table 2.4: Reporting Requirements under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 30 June 2013

Section

Issue

Outcome

Section 68 occurrences

Notification and reporting of accidents and dangerous occurrences

There were four notifications

Section 45 directions

Power to direct that workplace etc. not be disturbed

No directions were issued

Section 29 notices

Provisional improvement notices

No notices were issued

Section 30 notices

Duties of employers in relation to health and safety representatives

No notices were issued

Section 41 investigations

Investigations addressing non-compliance and possible breaches

There were no investigations

Section 46 notices

Power to issue prohibition notices

No notices were issued

Section 47 notices

Power to issue improvement notices

No notices were issued

During 2012–13, there were five new injury cases that resulted in claims being accepted for workers compensation. The last accepted claim was in August 2010. The Library’s premium rates for injuries over the past three years are shown in Table 2.5.

Table 2.5: Premiums for Injuries Suffered, 2010–14 (as a percentage of wages and salaries)

Premium Rates

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

Latest premium rates for the Library

0.71

0.53

0.38*

0.65

Premium rates for all agencies combined (for comparison)

1.20

1.41

1.77

1.81

Library premium rates as a percentage of all agencies (%)

59.17

37.58

21.46

35.91

* Including as amended retrospectively by Comcare.

Asset Management

Collection Asset

The collection is the Library’s major asset, on which many of its services are based. The total value of the collection is $1.515 billion.

Plant and Equipment, and Software

The Asset Management Committee oversees the Library’s Strategic Asset Management Plan, and coordinates operational asset acquisition programs. It also develops and monitors a four-year forward asset acquisition program for strategic planning purposes, and an asset disposal program for items reaching the end of their working life. Major asset acquisitions in 2012–13 included the purchase of information technology (IT) equipment and infrastructure, shelving and microform readers.

The total value of plant and equipment at 30 June 2013 was $13.953 million.

The total value of software at 30 June 2013 was $5.318 million.

Land and Buildings

The total value of the Library’s land and buildings has been assessed at $206.287 million, including the main building in Parkes and the repository in Hume. Management of the Library’s facilities is guided by the Building Works Coordinating Committee, which meets quarterly. A 15-year Building Long-term Strategic Management Plan is used to set directions for building works, including an annual maintenance plan and a five-year capital works program, which are reviewed each year by Council. This 15-year Strategic Management Plan was updated in November 2012.

The Strategic Building Master Plan ensures that building works are consistent with the long-term direction of the Library and underpins Library facility planning and budgeting. The plan was reviewed during 2011–12.

During the year, the Library commenced planning and design for the Reading Room Integration project. This is a major project for the Library. It will provide improved public and staff areas as well as refurbishment of plant, equipment, finishes and fittings across four levels of the main building. The proposed schematic design was endorsed by Council in April 2013 and the draft detailed design was completed in June 2013.

In 2012–13, a range of capital expenditure building projects were undertaken, including:

  • installation of energy-efficient lighting and control systems throughout stacks and offices
  • continuation of the Fire and Mechanical Services Upgrade project. Principal components undertaken during the year included the pressurisation of fire corridors on lower levels to create safe and smoke-free exit paths
  • construction of a new storage area for corporate records
  • refurbishment of the data centre to improve environmental conditions
  • disability access improvements, including the wheelchair lift to the Theatre stage
  • refurbishment of the cool store air-conditioning plant.

Consultation and design work has commenced on a number of other major projects, including for:

  • a new lighting strategy for the Main Reading Room and Foyer to address obsolescence and reduce energy usage
  • refurbishment of Executive Support and Public Programs office accommodation
  • a potential solar plant at the Hume Repository
  • refurbishment of external windows throughout the main building.

Heritage Management Strategy

The Library is included on the Commonwealth Heritage List and is committed to the conservation of the heritage values of the main building in Parkes. This includes consulting with recognised specialists before undertaking building works in sensitive areas. In 2012–13, the Library consulted as required on planning for the Reading Room Integration project in addition to a number of lighting projects and office fit-outs.

Following a review of the Library’s heritage furniture during 2011–12, an audit was conducted. As a result, a number of heritage furniture items are being refurbished, and significant items of furniture will be reused in the new integrated reading rooms in keeping with their original use.

In compliance with the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, the Library’s draft Conservation Management Plan underwent a public consultation process, after which it was submitted to the Minister for Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities and to the Australian Heritage Council. The plan was approved by the Australian Heritage Council at its March 2013 meeting, and by the Minister in June 2013.

Security and Business Continuity

The Library’s Emergency Planning Committee oversees all aspects of protective security and business continuity planning. This committee comprises senior staff with responsibility for relevant areas, including corporate communications, and the security of staff, the collection, buildings and other assets.

During 2012–13, the Library completed an update of security procedures, mindful of the additional requirements of the recent Australian Government Protective Security Policy Framework that may apply to the Library.

Energy Consumption and Environmental Management

The Library is committed to improving environmental performance across all areas of operations. An Environmental Policy and associated Environmental Action Plan determine targets for environmental performance. The Environmental Management System helps to set, implement and review these objectives and targets.

The Library’s Environment Management Committee, established to coordinate and achieve sustainability targets, meets quarterly. Reports on environmental targets and performance are provided annually to Council.

The Library also aims to incorporate sustainable development principles into major projects. For example, the architectural brief for Reading Room Integration includes the requirement for energy-efficient lighting, the selection of local and sustainable building materials where possible, and water-saving initiatives in bathrooms.

During 2012–13, the Library undertook a number of initiatives aimed at achieving better waste management, energy savings and a reduction in the carbon footprint. These initiatives included:

  • achieving accreditation with the ACTSmart Office Recycling program, a best-practice program on managing waste
  • commencing organic recycling in all kitchens
  • completing a lighting upgrade to stack areas and office space occupying 15 per cent of the main building, including installing energy-efficient fluorescent lights and sensors
  • commencing design of energy-efficient lighting upgrades to the Main Reading Room, Foyer and external lighting
  • trialling an improvement to procurement principles, which has seen the inclusion of environmental performance measures in major tenders, including for the Reading Room Integration project, the upgrade of microform readers, the security contract, and the Library’s solar project.

In comparison with the previous year, the Library has reduced gas consumption by 10 per cent to 4,381,117 MJ and electricity consumption by 9 per cent to 6,108,741 kWh. Water consumption has had to be estimated over the past two years, due to a faulty water meter. Notionally, water usage has increased by 7 per cent (May 2012 to April 2013) to 16,773 kL.

Recycling at the Library continues to be a major focus. Cardboard recycling has decreased slightly (by 4 per cent) to 21,250 kg, paper recycling has increased by 7 per cent to 41,003 kg, and commingle recycling has increased by 38 per cent to 14,579 kg. The recycling initiative for kitchens has seen the Library recycle 15,316 kg of organic waste in its first full year of operation.

Purchasing

The Library maintained a focus on cost-effective contract management and procurement practices consistent with Commonwealth Procurement Rules. Procurement and contract templates were reviewed, to ensure they continue to meet Government good practice and are simple and straightforward to use.

Large purchasing activities of the Library included the design and superintendence of the Reading Room Integration project, IT acquisitions, shelving and microform equipment replacement, mail and freight services, security services, stationery supplies, bookbinding, transcription services for the Oral History and Folklore Collection, and preservation duplication of audio.

The Library participated in the multi-use legal panel services administered by the Department of Finance and Deregulation until the end of May 2013, and then transitioned to the multi-use list administered by the Attorney-General’s Department in June.

There were no contracts of $100,000 or more that did not provide for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises.

Grants

During the reporting period, the Library operated ten grant programs.

Community Heritage Grants

The Library awarded 78 grants of up to $15,000 to assist community organisations to preserve and manage nationally significant cultural heritage collections. Financial support and assistance for this grants program were received from the Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport; the National Archives of Australia; the National Film and Sound Archive; and the National Museum of Australia.

Harold White Fellowships

The Library funded seven fellowships for established scholars and writers to spend up to six months at the Library researching collection material. Fellowships were awarded to Dr Christine Cheater, Professor Neville Kirk, Dr Gwenda Tavan, Dr Jan Tent and Ms Alana Valentine. Honorary Fellowships were awarded to Dr Kent Fedorowich and Professor James Cotton.

Japan Fellowships

Awarded to established scholars and writers to spend up to six months at the Library researching Japanese collection material, these fellowships are funded through the Harold S. Williams Trust. One fellowship was awarded to Dr Chiaki Ajioka.

Japan Study Grants

Also funded through the Harold S. Williams Trust, these grants support scholars in Japanese studies who live outside Canberra to research at the Library for up to four weeks. Grants were awarded to Dr Victoria Eaves-Young, Ms Machiko Ishikawa, Dr Emiko Okayama and Ms Kirsti Rawstron.

Minerals Council of Australia Fellowship

Funded by the Minerals Council, this fellowship supports research using the Library’s collections on the minerals industry in Australia. The fellowship was awarded to Dr David Lee.

National Folk Fellowship

With support from the National Folk Festival, the Library funded a four-week residency for Ms Catherine Ovenden to research original source material in the collection and prepare a Festival performance.

Norman McCann Summer Scholarships

Funded by Mrs Pat McCann, the Library awarded three scholarships of six weeks to young Australian postgraduate students Mr Steven Anderson, Ms Laura Rademaker and Ms Tillie Stephens to research topics in Australian history or literature.

Seymour Summer Scholarship

Funded by Dr John Seymour and Dr Heather Seymour AO, this scholarship of six weeks supports research, preferably in biography, by a young Australian postgraduate student. The scholarship was awarded to Ms Maria John.

Kenneth Binns Travelling Fellowship

Funded by Mrs Alison Sanchez to commemorate her father, Kenneth Binns, Chief Librarian of the Commonwealth National Library from 1928 to 1947, this fellowship supports travel for professional development by Library staff in the early stages of their careers. The 2013 fellowship was awarded to Ms Jenna Bain.

Friends of the National Library Travelling Fellowship

This fellowship, funded by the Friends of the National Library of Australia Inc., provides a significant professional development opportunity for a Library staff member. The 2013 fellowship was awarded to Ms Catriona Anderson.

Cooperation on Corporate Management Issues within the Portfolio

The Corporate Management Forum consists of senior executives from agencies in the Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport portfolio and a small number of non-portfolio agencies. The forum considers issues in human resource management, financial management, procurement, IT and facilities management, with a view to achieving economies of scale, sharing experience and encouraging best practice.

The forum met four times during 2012–13 and considered matters including:

  • the Commonwealth Financial Accountability Review
  • work health and safety requirements
  • capital planning and funding
  • energy management
  • risk management and insurance
  • enterprise agreements
  • performance indicators and reporting
  • shared services.

Information Technology

Information technology (IT) is used to facilitate and support the development of new online services and to ensure that these services are cost effective, reliable and responsive.

In recent years, the Library has developed and improved the Library’s Trove service, which supports discovery and use of collections held by Australian libraries and collecting institutions. The Library has also commenced a major project to replace systems used to build, preserve and deliver digital collections. IT and communication infrastructure is provided inhouse.

Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement Project

During 2012–13, the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project moved from planning and procurement to its implementation phase. Milestones achieved during this period include:

  • implementing pilots of the digitisation workflow system and digital preservation repository products selected during the project’s procurement phase
  • commencing the first implementation stage, which will deliver a system to support the digitisation, management and delivery of published books and journals in the Library’s collection. This system will also support bit-level preservation of the digital collections
  • completing an external health check review of the project. This review endorsed the project approach and progress, and no significant weaknesses with the current management or governance were identified.

Infrastructure and Services

During 2012–13, the Library’s digital collection increased in size by approximately 53 per cent, and now exceeds 2.5 petabytes of storage (see Figure 2.3). The major contributor to storage growth continues to be the digitisation of Australian newspapers (see Figure 2.4). Australian newspapers (62 per cent) dominate storage requirements, followed by archived web pages (25 per cent).

Figure 2.3: Growth in Digital Collection Storage, March 2004 to 30 June 2013

Area graph showing the National Library of Australia's increasing digital storage requirements from 2004 to 2013

Figure 2.4: Digital Collection Storage by Material, 30 June 2013

Pie chart showing the National Library of Australia's digital storage requirements based on media type

Note: Total of 99.8% due to rounding.

The Library also supports substantial infrastructure to enable the discovery of, and access to, its own and other collections. Figure 2.5 shows the growth in raw transaction load on the Library’s web services since 2000–01. Driven by the use of digitised Australian newspapers, Trove continues to experience strong growth in web activity.

Figure 2.5: Use of Web Services, 2000–01 to 2012–13

Area graph showing the National Library of Australia's increasing webserver requests from 2001 to 2013

In 2012–13, the Library updated the design of its website (nla.gov.au), with significant changes being made to the homepage, including a more streamlined layout and a fresher and more accessible colour palette. In accordance with the Government’s Web Accessibility National Transition Strategy, the Library continued to improve accessibility of its website. Using a sustainable semi-automated process for the first time, the Library’s 2011–12 Annual Report was presented in a format accessible to people with disabilities using screen readers. With the exception of a few financial documents that, for auditing purposes, could only be rendered as Adobe PDF documents, the entire report was made available in HTML. An accessibility audit of the Library’s website found substantial compliance with Level AA Success Criteria of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, thereby allowing more engagement by users with disabilities. Outstanding issues to be addressed include transcripts to accompany audio-only podcasts, non-standard forms from third parties, and text alternatives to some images.

Reliable IT infrastructure is essential to the Library’s digital storage and access services. Table 2.6 shows the average availability of ten key service areas. The target availability of 99.5 per cent was not met for all services, the major contributing factor being an extended outage in September 2012 due to the failure of a primary server. However, the new disaster recovery site worked very well throughout the ordeal, and provided excellent communications to the public and staff, augmented by the use of Facebook and Twitter. Public response was positive and, although users were disappointed that services were unavailable, they were understanding as the recovery work was performed.

Table 2.6: Availability of Ten Key Service Areas, 2012–13

Service

Availability (%)

Network

99.8

File and Print

99.9

Email

100.0

Website

98.9

Integrated Library Management System

99.7

Digital Library

99.0

Corporate Systems

100.0

Document Supply

99.5

Libraries Australia

98.4

Trove

98.4

A number of heavily used online services—namely Trove and Libraries Australia—also experienced periods of slow performance or reduced functionality during periods of high load from web-based users and web bots. In 2012–13, the Library commenced redevelopment projects for Trove Newspapers and Libraries Australia Search, involving updates to the software and hardware infrastructure supporting these services. These improvements will provide the capacity and scalability needed to support current and future demands.

Under its Strategic Asset Management Program, the Library continued to replace and upgrade IT infrastructure, including:

  • commissioning an additional petabyte of disk storage to support the digital collections using Isilon storage systems. This approach is expected to greatly reduce the chance of a single point of failure
  • upgrading the Library’s data backup system, including support for de-duplication technology to reduce backup size and performance time, as well as support for disk-based archives to reduce recovery time
  • upgrading the paid printing system for reading room users. Patrons can now print more easily over the wireless network and can charge their cards using EFTPOS
  • doubling the number of systems managed as virtual servers, including the extension of the server cluster to support digital library systems
  • implementing Microsoft Exchange 2010 and deploying Microsoft Lync communication services
  • replacing a number of inhouse systems supporting grant-based activities with a single commercial grants management system
  • implementing a more robust management system for short-term laptop loans to staff.

In response to the expected application to the Library of the Government’s Protective Security Policy Framework and its Information Security Manual, the Library:

  • completed a review of current IT policy and procedures
  • redrafted seven out of eight required IT security policies
  • implemented an internal information security website to assist staff to understand and manage their IT security responsibilities.

During 2012–13, the Library achieved modest improvements in energy consumption through:

  • refreshing and consolidating storage systems, which resulted in a material reduction in power consumption and heat load in the computer room
  • improving the automatic shutdown of public PCs to reduce power consumption when reading rooms are closed.

IT development activities aimed at improving services and operations included:

  • release of Forte, the Library’s first mobile application for accessing its digital collection, which provides access to the digitised sheet music collection
  • enhancements to Libraries Australia and the Integrated Library Management System, Copies Direct and other systems, to support changes in bibliographic records that flow from the introduction of Resource Description and Access by Australian libraries
  • enhancements to Trove
  • development of a Drupal-based service to enable Reader Services staff to maintain and enhance online research guides for users.

Report of Operations

Outcome and Strategies

Performance reporting in this chapter is based on the Library’s outcome and strategies set out in the Portfolio Budget Statement 2012–13. The Library has one outcome:

Enhanced learning, knowledge creation, enjoyment and understanding of Australian life and society by providing access to a national collection of library material.

In 2012–13, the Library achieved this outcome through its focus on four strategic directions:

  • collect and preserve Australia’s documentary heritage
  • make the Library’s collections and services accessible to all Australians
  • deliver national leadership
  • achieve organisational excellence.

Strategic Direction One: Collect and Preserve Australia’s Documentary Heritage

The Library collects Australian printed publications under the legal deposit section of the Copyright Act, as well as selected materials in other formats, including oral histories, manuscripts, pictures and e-publications. The Library also harvests and archives a snapshot of the Australian (.au) internet domain.

In 2012–13, the Library undertook to:

  • document Australia’s cultural, intellectual and social life by collecting, storing and preserving Australian print and digital publishing, personal papers, photographs, paintings, maps and oral histories
  • inform Australians about their region and their place in the world through the Library’s Asian and other overseas collections.

Major Initiatives

Legal Deposit Consultations

In November and December 2012, the Library participated in consultations concerning the extension of legal deposit to electronic materials. Other participants were publishers and other stakeholders, including the Australian Copyright Council, the Australian Publishers Association, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the Australian Digital Alliance and the Australian Libraries Copyright Committee. The views of the Copyright Agency Limited and the Australian Society of Authors were also represented. These consultations addressed the core concerns raised during the public consultation held earlier in 2012. Significant progress was made on substantive issues.

Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement Project

The Library completed the tender process for the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project, selecting DocWorks as its digitisation workflow system, and Safety Deposit Box as its preservation and digital library core system. The development of associated standards, specifications, workflows and selection policy for the digitisation of books and journals has also been completed, and digitisation will commence, using DocWorks, in 2013–14.

Overseas Collecting

The Library completed the implementation of strategic changes to its overseas collecting program during the year. The number of print journal subscriptions was reduced from approximately 2,000 titles to 750 titles, with the majority of the cancelled titles being out of scope for the Library’s collection or not core journals in their subject areas. In January 2013, the Library began offering overseas ebooks in place of print books. It is estimated that one-third of United States monographs acquired are now in ebook form, providing much-improved access for users.

In 2013–14, the Library will begin transferring remaining print subscriptions to digital format where possible, completing the strategic move from print to digital collecting.

Australian Digital Collecting

The PANDORA Australian web archive collection continued to increase, with a 14 per cent addition of new archived instances of websites and documents. The result was an increase of 29 per cent in the amount of data managed in the archive.

In May 2010, the Secretaries’ ICT Governance Board for whole-of-government arrangements gave approval for the Library to collect online government publications, resulting in bulk harvests of Australian Government websites in 2011, 2012 and 2013. The combined content collected in these harvests amounted to around 27 million files, or 2.1 terabytes of data. The Library will make this collection available in the second half of 2013 through the new access portal called the Australian Government Web Archive.

Issues and Developments

While Australian ebook publishing continues to evolve, most titles are still being produced in both print and electronic formats. The Library collects print versions through legal deposit, and has been negotiating with creators and publishers for the voluntary deposit of electronic versions where these can be made available for public access.

Australian print publications received through legal deposit declined during 2012–13. The number of print books received fell by approximately 15 per cent and the number of journal issues by around 10 per cent. While there are other variables influencing the receipt of legal deposit materials, such as publishers’ awareness of their obligations, this decline has been noticeable for some years. It reinforces the need for a legislative framework that enables the Library to receive e-publications through deposit in the same way that it does for print materials.

A project to preserve and digitise the Enemark Collection of 500 nitrate negative panoramic images (acquired by the Library in 1965) was completed. The images depict cities, towns and rural views in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory during the period 1917 to 1946. Their unusual format and fragility had meant they were not accessible prior to the digitisation.

Important collection items that received preservation treatment during the year included:

  • drawings and watercolours by George French Angas
  • pictures, plans and documents from the Eric Milton Nicholls collection for the exhibition, The Dream of a Century: The Griffins in Australia’s Capital
  • a seventeenth-century atlas, Atlantis Majoris, which required treatment for verdigris corrosion before being exhibited in Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia.

As part of an ongoing program to upgrade collection storage equipment, 7,500 linear metres of older, motorised compact shelving were replaced. Refurbishment of the Strong Room with purpose-designed shelving and plan cabinets for outsized material has enabled a 75 per cent increase in storage capacity for the Library’s most valuable, rare and highly restricted collection material.

Behind-the-scenes volunteer activities were reviewed, with the aim of aligning them more consistently with the priorities of collecting areas. Volunteers contribute to a range of collection activities, including sorting, describing and researching collection material to improve access.

The Library acquired many interesting and significant materials during the year. A selection of notable acquisitions is listed in Appendix J.

Performance

Data on the Library’s performance against deliverables and key performance indicators relating to storing, maintaining and cataloguing its collection is provided in the following tables (Tables 3.1 to 3.3) and figures (Figures 3.1 and 3.2).

Table 3.1: Develop, Store and Maintain the National Collection: Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2012–13

 

Measure

Target

Achieved

Deliverables

Collection items stored and maintained (no.)

6,470,000

6,496,935

 

Items catalogued or indexed (no.)

62,000

62,264

Key performance indicators

National collection: processing (%)

85.0

94.0

 

National collection: storage (%)

95.0

94.0

Figure 3.1: Number of Collection Items Stored and Maintained

Figure 3.1: Vertical bar graph showing the Number of Collection Items Stored and Maintained.

The target was met.

Table 3.2: National Collection—Storage (%)

Achieved

Achieved

Target

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

95.8

95.3

95.0

94.0

95.0

95.0

95.0

95.0

The average annual result is just below target. With the exception of the September quarter, conditions throughout the remainder of the year met or exceeded the 95 per cent target.

Figure 3.2: Number of Collection Items Catalogued or Indexed

Figure 3.2: Vertical Bar graph showing the Number of Collection Items Catalogued or Indexed

The target was met.

Table 3.3: National Collection—Processing (%)

Achieved

Achieved

Target

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

84.0

91.3

95.0

94.0

85.0

95.0

95.0

95.0

The target was exceeded. The target for this year had been reduced (by 10 per cent) to 85 per cent, in anticipation of the impact on staff training required to introduce the new Resource Description and Access (RDA) cataloguing rules. However, the move to the new cataloguing standard was achieved without the expected temporary decline in the time taken for processing.

Strategic Direction Two: Make the Library’s Collections and Services Accessible to All Australians

The Library provides access to its collection for all Australians through services to users in the main building and nationally through online information services. Its reference and collection delivery services are provided both to onsite users and to those outside Canberra via online services and the digitisation of selected collection resources. The Library also delivers a diverse annual program of exhibitions and events.

In 2012–13, the Library undertook to:

  • harness new and emerging opportunities in the digital environment—including the National Broadband Network—to engage with diverse Australian audiences, including those in regional and remote communities
  • support research and lifelong learning for all Australians by maximising online access to the Library’s collections and services.

Major Initiatives

Digitisation partnerships were a prime focus.

During 2012–13, 1.1 million pages of newspapers published in New South Wales and 330,000 pages from the New South Wales Government Gazette were digitised under a partnership with the State Library of New South Wales. This partnership will see 6 million pages of newspapers and the complete Government Gazette of almost 1 million pages digitised and accessible on Trove by June 2016.

In addition, 41 regional libraries, councils and other organisations sponsored the digitisation of 49 newspaper titles, amounting to 310,000 pages. Individuals and organisations also generously contributed to the project to digitise issues of The Canberra Times between 1955 and 1995.

Issues and Developments

Collection Management

A major project commenced to review policies and improve workflows associated with the development and management of the Library’s archival collections. This project will streamline collection processing activities including acquisitions, enhance collection control, and enable integration of similar work functions. It will also provide faster access to collection material for users, and better management of digital records.

Online Access to Special Collections

The Library continued its focus on increasing the discoverability and online access to special collections.

Innovative approaches have led to the cataloguing of over 1,150 map series, enabling users to identify individual sheets via digitised graphical indexes. All series covering the Pacific, South Asian and Middle East regions were completed, leading to increased use of these collections. Another project—to increase discoverability of pictures lacking an online catalogue record—produced subject-based records for approximately 365,000 photographs. A further 500 hours of oral history recordings were also delivered online, with the audio linked to transcripts and time-pointed summaries to support easier discovery and navigation.

In addition, a project to convert catalogue card entries for Chinese collection material was completed. This resulted in 7,000 new holdings being added to the online catalogue, greatly improving access to this important collection.

Information and Research Services

The Ask a Librarian and Copies Direct services are widely appreciated, particularly in regional Australia. Thirty-eight per cent of questions from Australian users to Ask a Librarian and 28 per cent of Australian Copies Direct requests came from people living in regional Australia. In the words of one user: ‘Superb service, courteous, accurate, fast … you will have saved me a trip to Canberra from Melbourne which is extra good. In addition, I am a disabled student with only one hand so your service is more than extra good, it is a life-saver’.

The system used to manage reference inquiries was upgraded to enable questions to be redirected efficiently. Inquiries received by Trove are now being transferred to the Ask a Librarian service, negating the need for clients to resubmit inquiries, and saving staff time through automatic transfer of both the inquiry and transaction history. Planning is under way to extend this functionality to enable the transfer of inquiries between all state and territory libraries.

The Library’s continued support of in-depth study of its collections is borne out by the output of researchers and authors. Dr Martin Thomas, for example, won the National Biography Award for his book, The Many Worlds of R.H. Mathews: In Search of an Australian Anthropologist, which was based on research undertaken during his Harold White Fellowship; author Kate Grenville was a regular user of the Petherick Reading Room; and Alan Fewster made extensive use of the Library for his book, The Bracegirdle Incident: How an Australian Communist Ignited Ceylon's Independence Struggle.

Online Engagement

A Social Media Coordinator was appointed to manage online engagement through Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube and blogs. The Library’s Flickr Commons account is updated with a monthly upload of photographs on selected themes such as the outback and Australians at war. The account generally receives over 800 visits per day, with a surge in visitation to approximately 75,000 daily visits following the upload of each new set of images. The Library has also commenced offering online participation in learning programs using the Google+ platform, which enables participants outside Canberra to hear the presenter and view the presenter’s screen.

An evaluation of the Library’s four instructional videos found they had received 30,000 unique views in the six months since release. These short online videos have an excellent retention rate; they explain how to get a library card, what is available online, how to order copies, and how to start researching family history. Two additional videos were developed on accessing newspapers and searching catalogues.

Publications and Exhibitions

The Library published 18 new books promoting the collection. Sold through more than 1,550 outlets in Australia and New Zealand and also online, sales of two titles—Flying the Southern Cross: Aviators Charles Ulm and Charles Kingsford Smith, and Topsy-turvy World: How Australian Animals Puzzled Early Explorers—required reprinting within six months of release. Topsy-turvy World has been shortlisted for the 2013 Children’s Book Council of Australia’s Eve Pownall Award for Information Book. Collaborative arrangements with the Indigenous Literacy Foundation’s Book Buzz program and the Libraries ACT Bookstart for Babies program resulted in bulk purchases of the Library’s children’s books.

Since the opening of the Treasures Gallery in October 2011, over 170,000 patrons have enjoyed viewing some of the Library’s greatest treasures. During the year, over 200 new items were displayed as the gallery content was refreshed on four separate occasions. Public response remains positive, and the gallery has successfully established itself as a new destination for tourists.

Performance

Performance data relating to access to the collection and service to users is provided as follows:

  • Table 3.4 shows deliverables and key performance indicators relating to access to the national collection and other documentary resources during 2012–13
  • Figure 3.3 compares delivery of physical collection items to users against targets over the past four years
  • Table 3.5 compares performance against the Service Charter over the same four-year period.

Table 3.4: Provide Access to the National Collection and Other Documentary Resources—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2012–13

 

Measure

Target

Achieved

Deliverable

Physical collection items delivered to users (no.)

238,000

182,192

Key performance indicator

Collection access: Service Charter (%)

100.0

99.0

Figure 3.3: Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users

Figure 3.3: Vertical Bar Graph Showing The Number of Physical Collection Items Delivered to Users

The target was not met. There is a clear trend of reduced usage of the Library’s printed collections, with users preferring digital resources, including Australian newspapers on Trove.

Table 3.5: Collection Access—Service Charter (%)

Achieved

Achieved

Target

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

100.0

100.0

100.0

99.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

The Service Charter standards for reference inquiries responded to and for collection deliveries were both met. The website availability target was not met due to an extended internet outage in September 2012.

Strategic Direction Three: Deliver National Leadership

The Library delivers national leadership by providing a range of IT services to Australian libraries and collecting institutions, and by leading and participating in activities that make Australia’s cultural collections and information resources more readily available to the Australian public and international communities.

In 2012–13, the Library undertook to:

  • provide national infrastructure to underpin efficient and effective library services across the country, and to support Australian libraries in the twenty-first-century digital world
  • share knowledge and innovation experiences with the Australian and international sectors and collaborate to respond to new challenges and opportunities.

Major Initiatives

Resource Description and Access (RDA)

RDA, the new standard for bibliographic description of library materials (and the first major change in cataloguing rules in 40 years) was successfully implemented. The Library supported the Australian library community in the implementation by providing train-the-trainer courses for educators, professional trainers, staff from cataloguing agencies, and system vendors. All training and implementation documentation was made freely available online, and the Library is facilitating practical implementation through a dedicated email discussion group. Libraries Australia services were updated to support the new standard. Within the Library, a comprehensive and tailored training program was conducted for staff, and changes to related systems, workflows and policies were all completed.

Libraries Australia

Australian libraries use the Libraries Australia Search service on a daily basis to support their cataloguing and collection management workflows. Use of the service has increased steadily over the last ten years, with a 13 per cent increase in the last year. The Library commenced a project to replace the underlying software to deliver improved performance, the capacity to support large-scale data quality improvement projects, and a more usable and efficient interface. A prototype search interface was released to Libraries Australia’s 1,200 members for comment in May; the new service is due for delivery by March 2014. Libraries Australia continues to be the primary pathway through which Australian library collections are added to Trove.

Trove

Trove’s content base grew significantly during the year, largely as a result of increased participation in the national newspaper digitisation program. Trove Newspapers was originally developed to support delivery of up to 4 million pages of content. However, the success of the Library’s newspapers contribution model has seen Trove Newspapers climb to more than 10 million pages of content this year. The combination of major increases in Trove content and a nearly 50 per cent increase in use over the last year placed strains on Trove’s supporting infrastructure and software, resulting in a significant number of service outages.

In response, the Library replaced and upgraded Trove hardware during the year, embarked on a major project to redevelop the Trove Newspapers search and delivery services (due for completion in August 2013), and completed a range of smaller scale tasks to improve reliability and performance. The redeveloped Trove Newspapers interface will be mobile friendly, reflecting the increasing proportion of Australians accessing the service on smart phones and other mobile devices. In addition, a number of features previously available in the decommissioned Picture Australia and Music Australia services were implemented in Trove.

In addition to collaborating with libraries to deliver more digitised newspaper content, the Library has increased its efforts to collaborate with other collecting institutions and organisations. Six museum collections—large and small, national and local—were added to Trove during the year, and work is under way to incorporate collections from Australian archives. In addition, significant content has been added from the ABC (podcasts and transcripts for most Radio National shows) and from the CSIRO (articles from more than 30 scientific journals dating back to 1904).

National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA)

The Library continues to work collaboratively with NSLA on a range of projects aimed at transforming and aligning services offered by the national, state and territory libraries so that the needs of Australians for access to library services in the digital age can be better met.

The Library is leading the NSLA Digital Preservation Group. This group’s work will drive digital capability development over the next decade or more. During the year, the group developed a joint statement on digital preservation, defined a matrix outlining the most important components of digital preservation systems, and developed a model for a technical registry and format library for NSLA libraries.

The Library also co-led projects on managing and providing access to very large collections of pictures and maps.

International Relations

The Library continued to collaborate with the international library community. The Director General attended the annual congress of the International Federation of Library Associations held in Helsinki, Finland, in August 2012, and the annual Conference of Directors of National Libraries in Asia and Oceania held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in March 2013. These gatherings provided opportunities to participate in meetings and discussion groups canvassing issues of mutual interest to national libraries, including the collecting and management of digital collections. Library staff also presented at international conferences and seminars, and liaised with colleagues around the globe.

Australia’s special relationship with libraries in the Asia–Pacific region was reinforced through a number of initiatives. These included signing a memorandum of understanding with the National Library of China, and providing significant support to the National Library of Malaysia as it prepared to implement RDA in that country.

Issues and Developments

Although the most obvious indicators of Trove use are via its dedicated interface, the last year has seen a subtle shift towards Trove as a platform for development by others. Almost all content is freely available to developers via the Trove application programming interface. In the last year, the Library has provided full copies of newspaper content to a range of national and international researchers, including the Smart Services Cooperative Research Centre based in Sydney, and Harvard’s Cultural Observatory. These organisations aim to improve the results of Optical Character Recognition and to derive semantic meaning from digitised text. The Library is facilitating such requests in the belief that these centres of excellence will eventually develop software solutions that could be redeployed into Trove and the Library’s digital library infrastructure.

At a smaller scale, a number of local developers have used Trove to develop experimental interfaces to Trove content, especially its pictorial content. In June, NSLA offered two prizes in the 2013 national GovHack competition, hosted by the Department of Finance and Deregulation. Developers from across the country used the Trove dataset to develop prototype services, ranging from a mobile device application juxtaposing modern and historical photographs of Perth, through to mixing Trove content with other data sources such as shipping indexes. The Library is assessing these developments, and considering whether any can be integrated into Trove within the existing resource base.

These developments highlight the ways in which digital data and content can be released for use in multiple national and international services, reaching wider audiences and increasing return on investment. The Library’s current and potential role as an aggregator of cultural content from the library, archives, museums, galleries and research sectors means it will be pivotal in making Australia’s cultural heritage more available to the world.

In contrast to the Library’s expanding role as a disseminator of freely available digital content, the Library closed its Electronic Resources Australia (ERA) service during the year. Established in 2007, ERA aimed to improve Australians’ access to licensed electronic resources by advocating for national or sectoral licences, and establishing a financially self-sufficient consortium to deliver common licensing terms and conditions, and competitive pricing on selected e-resource products. ERA delivered benefits to more than 1,000 libraries (principally school libraries) over its life. However, despite advocacy and considerable efforts by many, the Library reluctantly concluded that national or sectoral licences are not achievable in the foreseeable future, and that there is no sustainable business model for a service of this nature.

Performance

The following tables and figures show performance data relating to the Library’s goals for collaborative projects and services.

Deliverables and key performance indicators in relation to providing and supporting collaborative projects and services in 2012–13 are shown in Table 3.6.

Table 3.6: Provide and Support Collaborative Projects and Services—Deliverables and Key Performance Indicators, 2012–13

Measure

Target

Achieved

Deliverables

Agencies subscribing to key collaborative services (no.)

2,420

1,399

Records and items contributed by subscribing agencies (no. in millions)

15.060

37.570

Key performance indicators

Collaborative services standards and timeframes (%)

97.0

98.0

Figure 3.4 depicts the changes over the last four years in the number of agencies subscribing to key collaborative services.

Figure 3.4: Number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative Services

Figure 3.4: Vertical bar graph showing the number of Agencies Subscribing to Key Collaborative Services

The target was not achieved due to the cessation of the ERA service. This resulted in 1,058 agencies (mainly school libraries) discontinuing their participation.

A comparison over the past four years in the number of records contributed by subscribing agencies is provided in Figure 3.5.

Figure 3.5: Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies

Figure 3.5: Vertical Bar graph showing the Number of Records and Items Contributed by Subscribing Agencies

This target was exceeded. There was an increase in the number of newspaper articles and museum collection records contributed to Trove, and large batch loads of records were added to the Australian National Bibliographic Database.

Performance against the standards and timeframes for collaborative services is depicted in Table 3.7.

Table 3.7: Collaborative Services Standards and Timeframes (%)

Achieved

Achieved

Target

Target

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

97.8

96.6

98.0

98.0

97.0

97.0

97.0

97.0

The target was met.

Strategic Direction Four: Achieve Organisational Excellence

The Library aspires to integrate social and environmental goals into its governance and business operations; develop the full potential of its staff to achieve the Library’s vision; diversify its funding sources to support the need to deliver collections and services to all Australians; and maximise returns on government and private sector investment by managing financial resources effectively.

In 2012–13, the Library undertook to provide its staff with:

  • a work environment that promotes career development, work–life balance, and work health and safety
  • the opportunity to participate in, and contribute to, sound governance arrangements and effective financial management.

Major Initiatives

Strategic Workforce Plan

The Library reinvigorated its mentoring program, developed a set of core leadership capabilities and a related leadership model, and implemented a diversity work-experience program and a reflective senior leadership forum to assist with career sustainability. To prepare for the Library’s changing digital environment, a process to identify potential workforce gaps has also begun. This will be followed by a review of initiatives across similar institutions.

The Library is forming working groups to explore issues and initiatives relevant to each of the plan’s three priority areas: building on existing staff capabilities, developing responsiveness to digital change, and cultivating operational and career sustainability.

Work Health and Safety Management

Work health and safety continues to be a high priority for Council and the Corporate Management Group. Over the course of the year, the Library consolidated its work health and safety systems and processes. The documentation for the Work Health and Safety Management System was endorsed by the Corporate Management Group and is now available to staff via the intranet.

Environmental Management

The Library continued to make significant gains in environmental management, as outlined in the Corporate Overview. More than 75 per cent of staff were trained in best-practice approaches to managing waste, resulting in accreditation with the ACTSmart Office Recycling program.

The Library completed a trial at the Hume Repository, which involved turning off the air-conditioning for a period of 12 months to see how well the building passively maintained conditions. Temperature and relative humidity levels remained suitable for collection storage, and the trial was extended to other collection storage areas.

In addition, a review of collection storage practices was completed, to better align preservation requirements, stacks practices, and energy use and requirements.

Personal Giving, Philanthropic and Business Partnerships

In 2012–13, 24.4 per cent of Library revenue came from non-appropriation sources, including 0.9 per cent from personal giving and philanthropic partnerships.

Assisted by the Chair of Council and the Library’s Foundation Board, the Library raised $559,000 in cash donations and $20,000 of in-kind sponsorship. A major priority was to raise funds and secure in-kind support for the international exhibition, Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia, which will open in November 2013. By June, over $1.2 million in cash had been pledged, with $298,500 received. The Library also sought to develop stronger relationships with its donor communities and, through the annual fundraising appeal and two fundraising dinners, gained support for the preservation and digitisation of an important collection of panoramic photographs, and for an early atlas. Building on the Library’s strong supporter base, work on a formal bequest program was completed in June.

The Library also entered into fee-for-service partnerships with various state libraries to digitise collections, mostly newspapers. The value of the work undertaken in 2012–13 was $3.090 million.

Governance Arrangements

The Library has continued its sound governance practices. These include strategic plans and policies to manage the collection, workforce, buildings and other plant and equipment. At the time of writing, no compliance issues had been identified in respect of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act and no issues of significance were identified during the course of the internal or external audit programs. Regular reporting was provided to Council and Government on major projects, and additional reports and processes were set in train to manage identified budget risks.

Individual performance management cycles were aligned to the financial year, to achieve better integration of performance and management with Government performance targets.

A new regime for valuing the collection asset was also established, to provide greater assurance to Council and Government of its overall value.

Cross-agency Key Performance Indicators

In May 2012, the Hon. Simon Crean, then Minister for the Arts, announced that a new planning and performance reporting framework would be implemented to provide more consistent reporting across national cultural agencies. The first tranche of this new framework commenced in this reporting year.

Government Priority: Access and Relevance

Table 3.8 shows the total number of physical visits to the Library and its collection. Total visitation to the Library building covers both paid and unpaid visits, as well as visits by students as part of an organised education group. Also included in the total visitation data are offsite visitors who see items from the Library’s collection on display at other venues, usually through loans for exhibitions. As the Library has no control over how other institutions measure their visitation, it is difficult to predict a target with any accuracy.

Table 3.8: Number of Visits to the Organisation

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Visits

1,081,081

863,000

882,000

900,000

917,000

The target for the total number of visits was exceeded. There were several factors contributing to this result: a number of successful events and Friends programs, the popularity of the ACT Government’s Enlighten festival in March, and the higher than anticipated number of people who visited other venues interstate to view the Library’s collection items. Less than 1 per cent of all visits were for paid events.

Online visits to the Library’s website are measured separately, and are shown in Table 3.9.

Table 3.9: Online Visits

  Achieved Target Target Target Target
 

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

Visits (millions)

45.47

35.00

36.00

37.00

39.00

Pageviews (millions) 357 342 352 369 390

The targets were exceeded.

Government Priority: Vibrancy

Table 3.10: Number of Initiatives that Strengthen Ties with Other Countries

  Achieved Target Target Target Target
 

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

Formal

30

30

30

30

30

Informal 67 100 100 100 100

The Library hosted 30 formal initiatives that helped strengthen ties with other countries, involving visits from official representatives from over 13 countries; hosted government delegations from three countries; signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Library of China; exchanged information with senior colleagues on areas of potential collaboration with more than ten international libraries and other cultural institutions; and hosted visits by former Ministers for the Arts.

Other initiatives during the year included responding to international requests for advice and information on a range of Library services and activities, and hosting visits by staff from more than 12 international institutions. Library staff also presented papers or appeared on panels, either by invitation or as guest speakers, at 12 international conferences, seminars and meetings.

Government Priority: National Leadership and Organisational Excellence

Share of Funding by Source shows the funding received from Government, cash sponsorship, cash donations and other income as a percentage of total.

Table 3.11: Share of Funding by Source (as a percentage of total funds)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Operational from Government 68.4 71.3 71.8 72.0 72.0
Capital from Government 13.3 14.1 14.3 14.4 14.4
Cash sponsorship income 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Other cash fundraising income 0.8 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1
Other income 17.3 14.4 13.8 13.5 13.4

In summary, the majority of the Library’s funding is provided by Government. The variances to budget for funding from Government are due to increased funding received compared to budget for income from sources other than Government, and reflects the conservative nature of the budgets for non-Government funding. The main variances in the source of funding compared to budget were other income and the receipt of additional cash donations. ‘Other income’ refers to revenue from independent sources less resources received free, cash sponsorship and donations. The variance to the budget is due to additional sales of goods and services and the receipt of additional interest. 

In Table 3.12, expenditure on collection development, other capital items, other (non-collection development) labour costs, and other expenses is shown as a percentage of total expenditure.

Table 3.12: Expenditure Mix (as a percentage of total expenditure)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Collection development

31.2

30.5

31.5

31.6

31.6

Non-collection capital

9.3

13.6

10.8

11.0

11.1

Other (non-collection development) labour costs

26.6

23.5

24.3

24.2

24.0

Other expenses

32.9

32.3

33.3

33.2

33.3

A large proportion of Library funding is related directly to collection development, including selection, acquisition, accessioning and cataloguing. Other Non-collection capital expenditure relates to building refurbishments, software, plant and equipment. The actual variation against the target in this category relates mostly to revised timing for two major projects, the Digital Library Infrastructure Replacement project and the Reading Room Integration project. In respect of Other (non-collection development) labour costs, the variation was brought about, firstly, by reduced expenditure overall that was mostly driven by the underspend in Non-collection capital and, secondly, by salary spending on extra strategic projects.

Government Priority: Collection Management and Access

The following tables (Tables 3.13 to 3.17) provide data relating respectively to acquisitions, accessions, access, conservation and preservation, and the digitisation of the collection.

Table 3.13: Acquisition

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Number of acquisitions

132,634

107,400

58,400

58,400

58,400

The target was exceeded.

Table 3.14: Accessions

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Number of objects accessioned

48,428

47,000

52,250

52,250

52,250

Number of objects awaiting accessioning 3,336 8,294 2,750 2,750 2,750
Percentage of total objects accessioned 94.00 85.00 95.00 95.00 95.00

The targets were met. At the beginning of the year, it had been anticipated that the introduction of the new Resource Description and Access cataloguing rules would have a significant impact on accessioning timeframes. The impact was less than expected, resulting in an increase in the number of objects accessioned and a decrease in the number of objects awaiting accessioning.

Table 3.15: Access (percentage of the collection available)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

To the public (records in the catalogue)

92.10

90.00

90.00

90.00

90.00

To the public online

3.60

3.64

3.84

4.04

4.52

The target for the percentage of the collection available to the public was exceeded, due to the completion of the Chinese Card Catalogue Conversion project.

Table 3.16: Conservation/Preservation (as a percentage of total objects)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Number of objects assessed/condition checked 4.02 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00
Number of objects prepared for display or digitisation 0.03 - - - -
Number of items treated for preservation purposes only 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

The number of collection items assessed for preservation purposes was not met. There were fewer items than anticipated requiring condition checking. The condition of all new collection material is routinely checked, as are items requested for use onsite, through interlibrary loans, and for exhibitions. The number of collection items assessed for preservation purposes is below target because the condition of material requested for use is assessed before it is issued, and use of printed material has significantly declined this year.

Table 3.17: Digitisation (percentage of the collection digitised)

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Percentage of the total collection digitised

3.30

3.00

3.00

4.00

4.00

The target was exceeded.

Government Priority: Education

Table 3.18 shows that the target for participation in the Library’s learning and school education programs was exceeded. This was predominantly a result of significantly underestimated numbers of online visits to the Treasure Explorer website. Attendances at the Learning Program sessions were on par with expectations, although an increasing number of attendees referred to difficulties in finding a parking spot.

Table 3.18: Participation in Public and School Programs

 

Achieved

Target

Target

Target

Target

  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16

Learning and school education programs

43,743

12,500

12,500

13,700

13,700

 

Financial Statements

Audited Financial Statements

Appendices

Appendix A: The Council of the National Library of Australia and its Committees

COUNCIL

Chair

Portrait of Mr Ryan Stokes

Mr Ryan Stokes BCom (Curtin)

  • Non-executive member, New South Wales
  • Chief Executive Officer, Australian Capital Equity
  • Chief Operating Officer, Seven Group Holdings Pty Ltd
  • Director, Seven West Media Pty Ltd
  • Director, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute
  • Director, WesTrac Pty Ltd
  • Director, Iron Ore Holdings Pty Ltd
  • Council Member, Australian Strategic Policy Institute
  • Appointed on 1 July 2012 for a three-year term until 30 June 2015
  • Attended six of six meetings

 Deputy Chair

Portrait of Ms Deborah Thomas

Ms Deborah Thomas Dip. Fine Art (Monash), MAICD

  • Non-executive member, New South Wales
  • Director, Media, Public Affairs and Brand Development, Bauer Media Pty Ltd
  • Director Bangkok Post/ACP Magazines JV, Thailand
  • Board Member, ANZAC Centenary Advisory Board
  • Director, Royal Hospital for Women Foundation
  • Councillor, Woollahra Municipal Council, New South Wales
  • Reappointed on 12 November 2009 for a second three-year term until 11 November 2012
  • Reappointed on 11 April 2013 for a third three-year term until 10 April 2016
  • Appointed as Deputy Chair on 7 June 2013
  • Attended three of three meetings; attended one meeting as an observer

 Members

Portrait of The Hon. Dick Adams MP

The Hon. Dick Adams MP

  • Non-executive member, Tasmania
  • Federal Member for Lyons
  • Elected by the House of Representatives on 13 May 2011 for a three-year term until 12 May 2014
  • Attended five of six meetings

 Portrait of Ms Glenys Beauchamp

Ms Glenys Beauchamp PSM, BEc (ANU), MBA (Canberra)

  • Non-executive member, Australian Capital Territory
  • Secretary, Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport
  • Appointed 27 November 2012 for a three-year term until 26 November 2015
  • Attended two of five meetings; attended two meetings as an observer

 Portrait of The Hon. Mary Delahunty

The Hon. Mary Delahunty MAICD, BA (Hons) (La Trobe)

  • Non-executive member, Victoria
  • Executive Director, Luminosity Australia Pty Ltd
  • Deputy Chair, McClelland Gallery and Sculpture Park
  • Director, Centre for Advancing Journalism, University of Melbourne
  • Appointed on 11 April 2013 for a three-year term until 10 April 2016
  • Attended one of one meeting

 Portrait of Mr Richard Eccles

Mr Richard Eccles BA (ANU), MA (NSW)

  • Non-executive member, Australian Capital Territory
  • Deputy Secretary, Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport
  • Appointed on 29 September 2011 for a three-year term until 28 September 2014
  • Resigned from Council with effect from 21 July 2012

 Portrait of Dr Nicholas Gruen

Dr Nicholas Gruen BA (Hons) (ANU), LLB (Hons) (Melbourne), PhD (ANU)

  • Non-executive member, Victoria
  • Chief Executive Officer, Lateral Economics
  • Chairman, The Australian Centre for Social Innovation
  • Patron, Australian Digital Alliance
  • Non-executive Member, Board, Innovation Australia
  • Appointed on 11 April 2013 for a three-year term until 10 April 2016
  • Attended one of one meeting

 Portrait of Ms Jane Hemstritch

Ms Jane Hemstritch BSc (Hons) (London), FCA, FAICD

  • Non-executive member, Victoria
  • Non-executive Director, Lend Lease Group
  • Chair, Victorian Opera
  • Non-executive Director, Santos Ltd
  • Non-executive Director, Tabcorp Holdings Ltd
  • Non-executive Director, Commonwealth Bank of Australia
  • Appointed on 29 June 2010 for a three-year term until 28 June 2013
  • Term expired
  • Attended six of six meetings

 Portrait of Senator Gary Humphries

Senator Gary Humphries BA, LLB (ANU)

  • Non-executive member, Australian Capital Territory
  • Senator for the Australian Capital Territory
  • Elected by the Senate on 1 July 2011 for a three-year term until 30 June 2014
  • Attended six of six meetings

 Portrait of Ms Mary Kostakidis

Ms Mary Kostakidis BA, DipEd (Sydney)

  • Non-executive member, New South Wales
  • Member, Sydney Peace Foundation Advisory Panel
  • Member, Sydney Theatre (NSW Cultural Management Ltd)
  • Member, Freilich Foundation, Australian National University
  • Appointed on 12 November 2009 for a three-year term until 11 November 2012
  • Term expired
  • Attended two of two meetings

 Portrait of Mr Brian Long

Mr Brian Long FCA

  • Non-executive member, New South Wales
  • Deputy Chairman, Network Ten Holdings Ltd
  • Non-executive Director, Commonwealth Bank of Australia
  • Chairman, Audit Committee and Member of the Council of the University of New South Wales
  • Chairman, United Way Australia
  • Director, Cantarella Brothers Pty Ltd
  • Reappointed on 12 November 2009 for a third three-year term until 11 November 2012
  • Term expired
  • Attended one of two meetings

 Portrait of Dr Nonja Peters

Dr Nonja Peters BA (Hons), PhD (WA)

  • Non-executive member, Western Australia
  • Director, History of Migration Experience (HOME) Centre, Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University
  • Vice Chair, Advisory Committee, Western Australian Maritime Museum, Fremantle
  • Member, WA Advisory Committee, National Archives of Australia
  • Member, Friends of Battye Library Committee
  • Vice Chair, Associated Netherlands Societies of Western Australia
  • Appointed on 20 May 2010 for a three-year term until 19 May 2013
  • Term expired
  • Attended five of five meetings; attended one meeting as an observer

 Portrait of Professor Janice Reid

Professor Janice Reid AM, FASSA, BSc (Adelaide), MA (Hawaii), MA (Stanford), PhD (Stanford)

  • Non-executive member, New South Wales
  • Vice-Chancellor, University of Western Sydney
  • Board member, Whitlam Institute, University of Western Sydney
  • Member, National Cultural Heritage Committee
  • Vice-Chair, International Talloires Network of Universities
  • Member, NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation Board
  • Member, NSW Clinical Excellence Commission Board
  • Appointed on 14 June 2012 for a three-year term until 13 June 2015
  • Attended five of six meetings

 Portrait of Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich

Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich BA (Hons) (Macquarie), Dip. Information Management (NSW)

  • Director General and executive member, Australian Capital Territory
  • Appointed on 9 February 2011 and commenced on 11 March 2011 for a five-year term until 8 February 2016
  • Attended six of six meetings

Meetings

Council met on:

  • 3 August 2012
  • 5 October 2012
  • 7 December 2012
  • 1 February 2013
  • 5 April 2013
  • 7 June 2013.

AUDIT COMMITTEE

Chair

Ms Jane Hemstritch

  • Non-executive member of Council
  • Appointed to the Committee on 2 December 2011
  • Appointed as Chair of the Committee from 3 September 2012
  • Term expired
  • Attended three of three meetings

Mr Brian Long

  • Non-executive member of Council
  • Appointed to the Committee on 6 June 2003
  • Reappointed as Chair and member of the Committee on 5 February 2010
  • Term expired
  • Attended one of one meeting

Members

Mr Geoff Knuckey

  • External member
  • Appointed to the Committee on 1 May 2012
  • Attended three of three meetings

Ms Deborah Thomas

  • Non-executive member of Council and external member
  • Appointed to the Committee on 5 February 2010 until 11 November 2012, and reappointed from 11 April 2013
  • Attended two of two meetings

Other Council members attended meetings as follows:

  • Mr Ryan Stokes (three)
  • Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich (three)
  • Ms Mary Kostakidis (one)
  • Dr Nonja Peters (three)
  • Professor Janice Reid (one).

Terms of Reference

The Audit Committee’s terms of reference are:

  1. on behalf of the members of the Council of the Library, to oversee compliance by the Library and Council with obligations under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997
  2. to provide a forum for communication between the members of Council, senior managers of the Library, and the Library’s internal and external auditors
  3. to ensure that there is an appropriate ethical climate in the Library and to consider the adequacy, efficiency and effectiveness of the internal control system and risk management framework; and, further, to oversee compliance by the Library with those systems and procedures
  4. to consider the appropriateness of the Library’s accounting policies
  5. to consider the annual financial report of the Library and to recommend its adoption to Council.

Meetings

The Audit Committee met on:

  • 3 August 2012
  • 7 December 2012
  • 5 April 2013.

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Chair

Ms Jane Hemstritch

  • Non-executive member of Council
  • Attended two of two meetings

Members

Mr Ryan Stokes

  • Chair of Council
  • Attended two of two meetings

The Hon. Mary Delahunty

  • Non-executive member of Council
  • Attended one of one meeting

Ms Deborah Thomas

  • Non-executive member of Council
  • Attended one of one meeting

Terms of Reference

The Corporate Governance Committee’s terms of reference are to:

  1. evaluate the effectiveness of Council in its role in corporate governance
  2. evaluate the performance and remuneration of the Director General
  3. oversight the development of a list of prospective members for appointment to Council, subject to consideration and approval by the Minister.

Meetings

The Corporate Governance Committee met on:

  • 1 February 2013
  • 7 June 2013.

Appendix B: National Library of Australia Foundation Board

Chair

  • Mr Kevin McCann AM

Members

  • Ms Jasmine Cameron
    National Library of Australia
  • The Lady Ebury
  • Ms Lorraine Elliott
  • Ms Julia King
  • Ms Janet McDonald AO (until 5 June 2013)
  • Ms Cathy Pilgrim
    National Library of Australia
  • Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich
    National Library of Australia
  • Mr Douglas Snedden (from 5 June 2013)
  • Ms Deborah Thomas
    National Library of Australia Council

Secretariat

  • Development Office
    National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Terms of Reference for the National Library of Australia Foundation Board are to:

  1. provide advice on Library fundraising targets
  2. provide assistance and advice on major fundraising campaigns, events and associated activities
  3. assist in obtaining funds from a variety of sources, including the business and philanthropic sectors
  4. encourage individual members to personally contribute or actively secure amounts required for nominated Library fundraising appeals.

Appendix C: National Library of Australia Committees

Three committees provide advice to the Library:

  • Libraries Australia Advisory Committee
  • Fellowships Advisory Committee
  • Community Heritage Grants Steering Committee.

LIBRARIES AUSTRALIA ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Chair

  • Ms Anne Horn (until December 2012)
    Deakin University
  • Mr Geoff Strempel (from March 2013)
    Public Library Services (South Australia)

Members

  • Ms Liz Burke
    Murdoch University
  • Dr Alex Byrne
    State Library of New South Wales
  • Mr Peter Conlon
    Queanbeyan City Library
  • Ms Pamela Gatenby (until December 2012)
    National Library of Australia
  • Ms Amelia McKenzie (from March 2013)
    National Library of Australia
  • Mr Ben O’Carroll
    Queensland Department of Premier and Cabinet
  • Ms Ann Ritchie
    Editor, The Australian Library Journal
  • Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich
    National Library of Australia
  • Ms Rosa Serratore
    National Meteorological Library
  • Ms JoAnne Sparks (from March 2013)
    Macquarie University
  • Mr Andrew Wells
    University of New South Wales

Secretariat

  • Resource Sharing Division
    National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Libraries Australia Advisory Committee provides advice on strategic and policy issues affecting the delivery of the Libraries Australia service, the broad direction of service development and changes occurring in the library community that are likely to affect services.

FELLOWSHIPS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Chair

  • Ms Anne-Marie Schwirtlich
    National Library of Australia

Members

  • Emeritus Professor Graeme Clarke AO, FSA, FAHA
    Australian Academy of the Humanities
  • Dr Patricia Clarke OAM, FAHA
    Australian Society of Authors
  • Emeritus Professor Rod Home AM, FAHA
    Australian Academy of Science
  • Professor Purnendra Jain
    Asian Studies Association of Australia
  • Professor Pat Jalland FASSA
    Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia
  • Professor Joyce Kirk
    Australian Library and Information Association
  • Professor Julie Marcus
    Independent Scholars Association of Australia

Secretariat

  • Australian Collections and Reader Services Division
    National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Fellowships Advisory Committee makes recommendations on the award and administration of fellowships and scholarships.

COMMUNITY HERITAGE GRANTS STEERING COMMITTEE

Chair

  • Ms Jasmine Cameron
    National Library of Australia

Members

  • Ms Kim Brunoro (until December 2012)
    Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport
  • Ms Nicole Henry (December 2012 to March 2013)
    Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport
  • Mr Stuart Ray (from March 2013)
    Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport
  • Ms Helen Kon (until May 2013)
    National Museum of Australia
  • Ms Vicki Humphrey (from May 2013)
    National Museum of Australia
  • Ms Meg Labrum
    National Film and Sound Archive
  • Ms Rosemary Turner
    National Library of Australia
  • Ms Helen Walker
    National Archives of Australia

Secretariat

  • Executive and Public Programs Division
    National Library of Australia

Terms of Reference

The Community Heritage Grants Steering Committee provides advice and direction on matters associated with the Community Heritage Grants program, including policy and administration. It also facilitates the exchange of information about the program between the Library and funding partners.

Appendix D: Principal Supporting Policies and Documents

Information about the Library’s functions, objectives, policies and activities can be found in the documents listed below. Most policy documents are available on the Library’s website.

Legislation

  • Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997
  • National Library Act 1960
  • National Library Regulations (1994)
  • Portfolio Budget Statement
  • Public Service Act 1999

Strategic and Operational

  • Balanced Scorecard
  • Building Long-term Strategic Management Plan (2012)
  • Business Continuity Framework (2012)
  • IT Strategic Plan (2012–2015)
  • Risk Management Register (2013)
  • Social Media Policy (2012)
  • Strategic Directions 2012–2014
  • Strategic Workforce Plan (2012–2014)

Collection

  • Collection Development Policy: Australian Collecting (2008)
  • Collection Development Policy: Overseas, Asian and Pacific Collecting (2013)
  • Collection Digitisation Policy (2012)

Cataloguing

  • Cataloguing Authority Control Policy (2011)
  • Cataloguing Policy (2011)

E-resources

  • Acceptable Use of Information and Communications Technology Policy (2011)

Preservation

  • Collection Disaster Plan (2012)
  • Digital Preservation Policy (2012)
  • Policy on Participation in Cooperative Microfilming Projects with Other
    Institutions (2010)
  • Policy on Preservation Copying of Collection Materials (2007)
  • Preservation Policy (2009)

Service Charter

  • Policy on Handling Complaints and Other User Feedback (2011)
  • Service Charter (2011)

Reader Services

  • Code of Conduct for Readers and Visitors (2011)
  • Information and Research Services Policy (2011)

Corporate Services

  • Disability Framework (2011)
  • Enterprise Agreement (2011–2014)
  • Environmental Management System (2013)
  • Fraud Control Plan (2012–2013)
  • Protective Security Policy and Procedures (2013)
  • User Charging Policy (2011)
  • Visitor Access to, and Use of, Medications and Other Personal Medical Equipment in the Library (2013)

Public Programs

  • Events Policy (2013)
  • Exhibitions Loans Policy (2011)
  • Exhibitions Policy (2011)
  • Learning Policy (2011)
  • Policy on Bequests (2012)
  • Publications Policy (2012)
  • Volunteer Program Policy (2010)

Appendix E: Consultancy Services

The following table shows new consultancy services with an individual value of $10,000 or more that were let in 2012–13, the nature of the consultancy, its value or estimated value, the selection process, and justification of the decision to use the consultancy.

Table E.1: Consultancy Services Engaged, 2012–13

Consultant

Purpose

Contract price ($)*

Selection process

Justification
(see above note)

Ashurst Australia

General legal advice

$69,222

Open tender

B

Clayton Utz

General legal advice

$35,356

Open tender

B

Clayton Utz

Legal advice on copyright issues

$13,684

Open tender

B

Cunningham Martyn Design Pty Ltd

Design and superintendence of Reading Room Integration project

$1,601,080

Direct sourcing

B

GHD Pty Ltd

Design documentation for refurbishment of Lower Ground Floor

$54,450

Open tender

B

GHD Pty Ltd

Engineering services for Library Windows Refurbishment project

$58,798

Open tender

B

Gundabluey Research Pty Ltd

Evaluation of customer satisfaction with Trove

$37,730

Select tender

C

Heritage Management Consultants

Ongoing heritage advice for building works

$13,284

Direct sourcing

B

IA Group

Design services for office refurbishment

$45,700

Open tender

A

John Raineri and Associates

Review of lighting in Foyer and Main Reading Room

$33,140

Direct sourcing

B

Minter Ellison Lawyers

Legal advice on extension of Legal Deposit

$38,141

Open tender

B

PSARN International Pty Ltd

IT security review of Information Security Manual and Protective Security Policy Framework compliance

$48,400

Direct sourcing

B

Rudds Consulting Engineers Pty Ltd

 

Documentation and specifications for alternate energy supply

$44,433

Open tender

B

Steensen Varming (Australia) Pty Ltd

Design and documentation for external façade lighting and surrounds

$74,140

Open tender

B

Step Two Designs

Review and advisory services to assist with Intranet Design project

$17,444

Direct sourcing

B

Storytorch Consulting

Development of strategy for travelling exhibition programs

$20,228

Direct sourcing

C

Strategic Facility Services Pty Ltd

Preparation of Building Life Cycle Costing Report

$23,650

Direct sourcing

B

Vision Australia

Accessibility audit of Library’s corporate website

$12,540

Direct sourcing

B

Wilde and Woollard

Quantity survey for Library Windows Refurbishment project

$24,123

Direct sourcing

B

Grand Total (19)

 

$2,265,542

   

The following justifications are the rationales for the decisions to undertake consultancies:

A: Skills currently unavailable within organisation
B: Need for specialised or professional skills
C: Need for independent research or assessment.

*Values are GST inclusive

Appendix F: Staffing Overview

With the exception of the Director General, all Library staff are employed under the Public Service Act. Conditions of employment for staff below the Senior Executive Service (SES) level are contained in the Library’s Enterprise Agreement 2011–2014. Some staff received enhanced benefits through an Individual Flexibility Arrangement.

At 30 June 2013, the Library had 418 full-time and part-time ongoing staff, 52 full-time and part-time non-ongoing staff and 16 casual staff. Refer to Table F.1 for more details. The average full-time equivalent staffing for 2012–13 was 437, compared to 429 in 2011–12.

Staff Distribution

Table F.1: Staff Distribution by Division, 30 June 2013

Division

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

June 2013

Total

June 2012

Total

 

Full time

Part time

Full time

Part time

Casual

Collections Management

126

26

7

5

5

169

181

Australian Collections and Reader Services

81

25

11

11

9

137

135

Resource Sharing

26

2

1

0

0

29

29

Information Technology

40

5

3

0

0

48

45

Executive and Public Programs

37

10

5

6

1

59

57

Corporate Services

35

5

1

2

1

44

41

Total

345

73

28

24

16

486

488

Staff Classification

Table F.2: Ongoing and Non-ongoing Full-time and Part-time Staff by Classification and Gender, 30 June 2013

 

Classification

Ongoing

Non-ongoing

June 2013 Total

June 2012 Total

Full time

Part time

Full time

Part time

Casual

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

Statutory office holder

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

SES Band 1

2

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

4

2

4

EL 2

10

12

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

11

13

11

15

EL 1

33

33

2

3

1

1

0

0

3

0

39

37

34

36

APS 6

16

41

5

17

0

3

1

0

0

1

22

62

20

65

APS 5

22

35

0

16

1

1

0

2

0

2

23

56

23

58

APS 4

18

54

0

13

1

6

1

2

0

1

20

76

19

70

Graduate

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

1

APS 3

13

38

0

8

5

5

0

5

0

1

18

57

15

60

APS 2

3

10

0

7

2

1

6

7

1

6

12

31

16

37

APS 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Cadet

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Total

117

228

8

65

10

18

8

16

4

12

147

339

140

348

Grand total

345

73

28

24

16

486

488

Note: Table is based on paid employees. Employees on long-term leave for more than 12 weeks are not included.

SES Staff Movements

Ms Pamela Gatenby, Assistant Director General, Collections Management, retired on 14 March 2013. Ms Gatenby had been on extended leave since 17 December 2012. Ms Amelia McKenzie was subsequently promoted to Assistant Director General, Collections Management, on 2 April 2013.

Equal Employment Opportunity

Table F.3: Staff by Equal Employment Opportunity Group and APS Classification, 30 June 2013

Classification

Male

Female

Total

Indigenous peoples

People with disability

Culturally and linguistically diverse background

Statutory office holder

0

1

1

0

0

1

SES Band 1

2

4

6

0

1

0

EL 2

11

13

24

0

1

3

EL 1

39

37

76

0

4

13

APS 6

22

62

84

0

5

11

APS 5

23

56

79

2

2

12

APS 4

20

76

96

1

7

23

APS 3 & Graduate

18

59

77

3

5

26

APS 2

12

31

43

1

2

17

APS 1

0

0

0

0

0

0

Cadet

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

147

339

486

7

27

106

Note: Data for equal employment opportunity groups is based on information supplied voluntarily by staff.

Staff Training

The Library develops an annual Staff Training Calendar.

This calendar is developed through consultation with all areas of the Library and includes priorities identified through the Library’s Strategic Workforce Plan, division business plans, and the individual performance development plans of staff, and recognises the 70:20:10 developmental model[1] that has wide application in the Australian Public Service.

Staff undertook development opportunities through both internal and external programs, including seminars, workshops and on-the-job training and placements. Training opportunities covered Library technical skills such as cataloguing, digital publications and preservation, as well as capability development in oral communication and management skills, procurement, writing, and strategic planning. Diversity training was also undertaken during the year, including Indigenous cultural awareness training.

As part of the Library’s Focus on Leadership Seminar Series, a number of industry leaders (including Dr Ian Watt AO, Professor Peter Shergold AC, Ms Glenys Beauchamp PSM and Mr Andrew Sayers AM) presented to staff. The seminar series is an important element of the Library’s leadership development, providing the opportunity to hear from and ask questions of senior leaders.

The Library continues to develop its e-learning options, with the introduction of a new online module to assist staff in understanding fraud and ethics as they apply to the Library environment. The Library also undertook a substantial review of the online induction program. The online induction module complements the Library’s face-to-face induction sessions and strengthens important messages about the Library’s workplace and APS Values.

The total training and development expenditure, excluding staff time, was $387,750. The number of training days undertaken by staff is set out in Table F.4.

Table F.4: Training Days, 2012–13

Classification

Male

Female

Total

SES

6

29

35

EL 1–2

146

160

306

APS 5–6

147

503

650

APS 1–4

95

497

592

Total

394

1,189

1,583


[1] A blended development model comprising 70% on-the-job experience, 20% coaching and 10% facilitated learning (e.g. classroom and training calendar offerings).

Appendix G: Gifts, Grants and Sponsorships

SUBSTANTIAL COLLECTION MATERIAL DONATIONS

  • Ms Susan Allen
  • Ms Jeannie Baker
  • Mrs Patricia Bennett
  • Mr Stephen Brady CVO
  • Ms Christine Burgess
  • Ms Jill Causer
  • Mrs Katherine Cawsey
  • The Hon. Fred Chaney AO
  • Ms Shelley Cohney
  • Ms Tanya Crothers
  • Ms Helen Evans
  • Ms Samantha Flanagan
  • Dr Paul Fox
  • Mr Jeffrey Frith
  • Mr Phillip Knightley AM
  • Mr Chris McCullough
  • Ms Esther Missingham
  • Mr Alan Moir
  • Dr A. Barrie Pittock PSM
  • The Estate of Professor Judith Robinson-Valery
  • Ms Diane Romney
  • Ms Louise Saxton
  • Ms Jane Sullivan
  • Sydney Dance Company
  • Ms Simone Vinall
  • Ms Madeleine Jane Viner

GRANTS

  • Australia China Council (Oral History Project)
  • Australian Broadcasting Corporation (Oral History Project)
  • Australian Paralympic Committee (Oral History Project)
  • City of Melbourne (Oral History Project)
  • Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport (Community Heritage Grants)
  • Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House (Oral History Project)
  • National Archives of Australia (Community Heritage Grants)
  • National Collecting Institutions Touring and Outreach Program (exhibitions)
  • National Film and Sound Archive (Community Heritage Grants)
  • National Folk Festival (National Folk Fellowship)
  • National Museum of Australia (Community Heritage Grants)

SPONSORSHIPS

  • Australian Capital Tourism (Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia)
  • The Brassey of Canberra (accommodation)
  • Forrest Hotel and Apartments (accommodation)

BEQUESTS

  • The Estate of Mr John Anthony (Tony) Gilbert
  • The Estate of Mr Harold S. Williams

FELLOWSHIPS AND PUBLIC PROGRAMS

  • Events ACT (Enlighten)
  • Friends of the National Library of Australia (Friends of the National Library Travelling Fellowship)
  • Mrs Pat McCann (Norman McCann Summer Scholarship)
  • Mrs Alison Sanchez (Kenneth Binns Travelling Fellowship / Kenneth Binns Lecture)
  • Dr John Seymour and Dr Heather Seymour AO (Seymour Summer Scholarship / Seymour Biography Lecture)

Appendix H: National Library of Australia Fund

The National Library of Australia Fund helps the Library to manage, develop, preserve, digitise and deliver its documentary heritage collections to the widest possible audience, both online and from the main building.

This year, specific campaigns have included The Canberra Times digitisation project, the Enemark Collection conservation project, the Proeschel Atlas conservation project, and support for the Mapping Our World: Terra Incognita to Australia exhibition.

National Library of Australia Fund donors are acknowledged at the following gift levels:

  • Platinum Patron: gifts of $100,000 and above
  • Gold Patron: gifts of $50,000 and above
  • Silver Patron: gifts of $25,000 and above
  • Bronze Patron: gifts of $10,000 and above
  • Patron: gifts of $1,000 and above
  • Donor: gifts up to $1,000.

The Library gratefully acknowledges the generosity and support of patrons and donors.

Listed below are patrons who have given to the fund since its inception in 2009 and donors who have given during 2012–13. (An asterisk beside a name in the lists below indicates Patrons who donated during 2012–13.)

PLATINUM PATRONS

  • Mrs Pat McCann*
  • Mrs Alison Sanchez*

GOLD PATRONS

  • Dr John Seymour and Dr Heather Seymour AO*

SILVER PATRONS

  • Associate Professor Noel Dan AM and Mrs Adrienne Dan*
  • Dr Ron Houghton DFC and the late Mrs Nanette Houghton*
  • Mr Kevin McCann AM and Mrs Deidre McCann*
  • Mr Nigel Peck AM and Mrs Patricia Peck*
  • Mr Ryan Stokes*
  • Wesfarmers Limited*
  • One supporter has donated anonymously.

BRONZE PATRONS

  • Mr Jim Bain AM and Mrs Janette Bain
  • Dr Diana Carroll*
  • Ms Christine Courtenay AM and the late Mr Bryce Courtenay AM*
  • Mr John Fairfax AO and Mrs Libby Fairfax
  • Mr Tim Fairfax AM*
  • Mr James Ferguson
  • Ms Catherine Hope Gordon*
  • Ms Jane Hemstritch*
  • Liberty Financial*
  • Ms Marjorie Lindenmayer*
  • The late Dame Elisabeth Murdoch AC, DBE
  • Mrs Maria Myers AO
  • Mr Doug Snedden and Ms Belinda Snedden*
  • Dr Fiona Terwiel Powell*
  • Mr A.G.D. White OAM and Mrs Sally White OAM*
  • Mr Stephen Yorke
  • Two supporters have donated anonymously.

PATRONS

  • Ake Ake Fund*
  • Dr Marion Amies*
  • Mrs P.S.M. Andrew*
  • Arkajon Communications Pty Ltd*
  • Ms Joanna Baevski*
  • Mr Sam Bartone
  • Mrs Jennifer Batrouney SC
  • The Hon. Justice Annabelle Bennett AO and Dr David Bennett AC, QC*
  • Ms Baiba Berzins*
  • Mrs Phoebe Bischoff OAM*
  • Professor Geoffrey Blainey AC*
  • Dr Ruth Bright AM and Dr Desmond Bright*
  • Mr Charles Bright and Mrs Primrose Bright*
  • Dr Geoffrey Cains and Mrs Sarah Cains*
  • Mrs Josephine Calaby
  • Dr Edmund Capon AM, OBE and Mrs Joanna Capon OAM*
  • Emeritus Professor David Carment AM*
  • Dr Patricia Clarke OAM, FAHA*
  • Dr Russell Cope PSM
  • Mr Victor Crittenden OAM*
  • Mrs Gloria Cumming*
  • Mr Charles Curran AC and Mrs Eva Curran*
  • Ms Perri Cutten*
  • Ms Lauraine Diggins
  • The Lord and Lady Ebury*
  • The Hon. R.J. Ellicott QC*
  • Dr Suzanne Falkiner
  • Mr Denis Foot and Ms Dianne Redwood*
  • Mr Andrew Freeman
  • Ms Jan Fullerton AO*
  • Ms Jean Geue*
  • Ms Christine Goode PSM*
  • Ms Margaret Goode*
  • Ms Grazia Gunn and Professor Emeritus Ian Donaldson FAHA, FBA, FRSE*
  • Professor Margaret Harris*
  • Mr Robert Hill-Ling AO and Mrs Rosemary Hill-Ling OAM
  • Mrs Rosanna Hindmarsh*
  • Mrs Claudia Hyles*
  • Dr Joyce Kirk and Dr Terry Kirk*
  • Mr Lou Klepac OAM and Mrs Brenda Klepac*
  • KPMG*
  • Leighton Holdings Limited*
  • The Linnaeus Estate*
  • Dr Jan Lyall PSM
  • Emeritus Professor Campbell Macknight
  • Mrs Janet McDonald AO and Mr Donald McDonald AC*
  • Mrs Vacharin McFadden*
  • Mr Peter McGovern AM
  • Captain Paul J. McKay
  • Ms Fiona McLeod SC
  • Mr Ronald McLeod AM*
  • Ms Janet Manuell SC
  • Mrs Glennis Moss and the late Dr Kenneth Moss AM
  • Mr Baillieu Myer AC and Mrs Sarah Myer*
  • Ms Jane Needham SC
  • Professor Colin Nettelbeck FAHA and Mrs Carol Nettelbeck*
  • Mr John Oliver and Mrs Libby Oliver*
  • Dr Melissa A. Perry QC
  • Mrs Pamela P. Pickering*
  • Mr Chester Porter QC*
  • Professor Janice Reid AM, FASSA*
  • Mrs E. Richardson OAM*
  • Mr Jack Ritch and Mrs Diana Ritch*
  • Emeritus Professor Alan Robson AO*
  • Dr Maxine Rochester*
  • Miss Kay Rodda*
  • Professor Michael Roe
  • Ms Christine Ronalds AM, SC
  • Mr Alan Rose AO and Mrs Helen Rose*
  • Mrs Margaret S. Ross AM*
  • Rotru Investments Pty Ltd for Mrs Eve Mahlab AO and Mr Frank Mahlab*
  • Professor Robert Shanks and Ms Josephine Shanks*
  • The Reverend Garth Shaw
  • Mr Stephen Shelmerdine and Mrs Kate Shelmerdine*
  • In memory of the late Mr Edmund Simon
  • Mrs Mary Simpson
  • Mr Dick Smith AO*
  • Mrs Helene L. Stead*
  • Mr Robert Thomas AM*
  • Mr William Thorn and Mrs Angela Thorn*
  • Ms Lisa Turner*
  • Mr John Ulm and Mrs Valda Ulm*
  • Mr Gerald Walsh*
  • Ms Lucille Warth
  • Mr Norman Wheatley and Mrs Joy Wheatley*
  • Dr Michael W. Young
  • Seven supporters have donated anonymously.

DONORS

  • Dr Mario Adamo and Mrs Judy Adamo
  • Mrs Patricia Allen
  • Dr Robert Allmark
  • Mrs Margaret Anderson
  • Mr Bruce Andrews
  • Mrs Nolene Baker and Mr Don Baker
  • Mr Shane Baker and Ms Linda Pearson
  • Dr Glen Barclay and Dr Caroline Turner AM
  • Sister Margaret Barry
  • Ms Margaret Bettison
  • Mr Udai N. Bhati
  • Mr K.J. Blank
  • Mrs Jean Bloomfield
  • Dr John Bloomfield
  • Ms Emily Booker
  • Ms Fiona Brand
  • Mrs Mary E. Brennan
  • Mrs Margaret Broeks
  • Mrs Margaret Brown
  • Professor Mairead Browne
  • Dr Joan Buchanan AM
  • Mrs Ann Burgess and Dr Miles Burgess
  • Mr David Burke OAM
  • Dr Geoffrey Burkhardt FACE
  • Mr John Burston and Mrs Rosanna Burston
  • Ms Dorothy Cameron
  • Rear Admiral David Campbell AM
  • Mr Martin Carritt
  • Mrs Marguerite Castello
  • Mr Alfred Chi
  • Ms Helene Chung
  • Mrs N. Clarke
  • Mr J.L. Cleland and Mrs E.S. Cleland
  • Mrs M.J. Cockerell
  • Miss Winsome Collingridge
  • Mrs Christine Collingwood and Mr John Collingwood
  • Dr Veronica Condon
  • Ms Margaret Cowburn
  • Mrs Mary Crean
  • Professor Robert Cribb
  • Mr Brian Crisp
  • Ms Debra Cunningham
  • Mrs Carolyn Curnow and Mr Bill Curnow
  • Lady Currie
  • Ms Merl Cuzens
  • Mr Brian Davidson
  • Brigadier Phillip Davies AM
  • Mr Nigel D'Cruz
  • Mr Norman Dickins
  • Mrs Sarah Dingwell
  • Mr Tiem Dong
  • Ms Melanie Drake
  • Mr Ian Dudgeon and Mrs Kay Stoquart
  • Miss Robyn A. Duncan
  • Mrs R. Eastway
  • Professor Paul Eggert FAHA
  • Mr Anthony Ewing
  • Dr Neville Exon
  • Mr John Farquharson
  • Mr Brian Fitzpatrick
  • Dr Juliet Flesch
  • Mr Michael P. Flynn
  • Mr W.L. Ford
  • Mr Robert Foster and Mrs Irene Foster
  • Mrs Neilma Gantner
  • Professor Paul A. Gatenby AM
  • Ms Milena Gates
  • Mr Robert O. Goldsborough
  • Mr John Gough AO, OBE and Mrs Rosemary Gough
  • In memory of the late Mr Noel Gough
  • In memory of the late Mr Gordon Gow
  • Professor Tom Griffiths and Dr Libby Robin
  • Ms Linda Groom
  • Mr Alan Hall and Ms Heather Hall
  • Mrs Isobel Hamilton
  • Mrs Judith Deakin Harley
  • Mr A.C. Harris
  • Mr John Hawkins and Mrs Robyn Hawkins
  • Ms Heather Henderson
  • Mrs Margaret Heseltine
  • Dr Marian Hill
  • Ms Diana Howlett
  • Mrs Margaret A. Hughes
  • Mrs Jill E. Hutson
  • Dr Anthea Hyslop
  • Professor Peter Ilbery OAM
  • Interface Research & Strategy Pty Ltd
  • Mr David Jarvis
  • Mr David Jellie
  • Dr J.V. Johnson CSC, AAM
  • Dr Robert Jones and Dr Jeanette Thirlwell
  • Dr Garry Joslin
  • Ms Meryl Joyce
  • Mrs Lily Kahan
  • Ms Joan Kennedy
  • Dr Ruth Kerr OAM
  • Professor Wallace Kirsop
  • Mrs Karleen Klaiber
  • Ms Jennifer Kruse
  • Ms Anne Latreille
  • Mr Geoff Ledger AM, DCS
  • Mr Bradley Leeson
  • Ms B.P. Lewis
  • Mr Donald Limn
  • Ms Nina Loder
  • Mr Michael Lynch and Ms Liz Lynch
  • Mr A.R. McCormick
  • Mrs Joan Macrae
  • Mr David McDonald
  • Ms Sarah McKibbin
  • Ms Heather McLaren
  • Dr D.F. McMichael AM
  • Mr Scott McMurtrie
  • Dr Stephen G. McNamara
  • Ms Jennifer McVeigh
  • Mr John Maffey OAM
  • Mr John B. Malone
  • Mr Robert B. Mark JP
  • Ms Marjon Martin
  • Mrs M.J. Mashford
  • Ms Evelyn Mason
  • Mr G.A. Mawer
  • Mr G.D. Meldrum
  • Mr Bruce Moore
  • Dr Elizabeth Morrison
  • Dr Satyanshu Mukherjee
  • Mrs Margaret Murray
  • Ms Prue Neidorf
  • Mr C. Neumann
  • Ms Marion Newman
  • Mrs M. Nicol
  • Mrs Elizabeth Nunn
  • Ms Anne O'Donovan
  • The Hon. Mr Justice (Ret) Barry O’Keefe AM and Mrs Jeanette O’Keefe
  • Mrs Janette Owen
  • Dr Margaret Park and Mr George Imashev
  • Ms Benoni McClean Pearson
  • Mr J.W. de B. Persse
  • Mrs Cathy Pilgrim and Mr Steven Anderson
  • Mrs Winsome Plumb
  • Dr Peter Pockley
  • Mr Bryce Ponsford
  • Lady Potter AC
  • Mr Graeme Powell
  • Bishop Pat Power
  • Mrs Dorothy Prescott OAM and Mr Victor Prescott
  • Mrs Anne Prins
  • Mr J. Quaid
  • Mr Binayak Ray
  • The Hon. Margaret Reid AO
  • Mr Ian Renard
  • Ms Dorothy Rhodes
  • Mrs E.E. Richardson
  • Ms Juliet Richter
  • Dr Bruce Roberts
  • Mrs Patricia Roberts
  • Mr Jordan Rocke
  • Professor Jill Roe AO
  • Mr and Mrs W. Rutledge
  • Mrs S. Saunders
  • Ms Mary Scholes
  • Mr Bill Semple
  • Professor John Sharkey AM and Mrs Marie Sharkey
  • Ms Mary Sheen
  • Mr John Small
  • Mr Michael Smith
  • Ms Wendy Smith
  • Mrs Ilse Soegito
  • Mr D.M. Somerville
  • Mr Peter Spyropoulos and Mrs Maria Spyropoulos
  • Associate Professor Ross Steele AM
  • Ms Elizabeth Stone
  • Mrs Nea Storey
  • Dr Jennifer Strauss AM
  • Mrs Gay Stuart and Mr Charles Stuart
  • Dr Nicole Sully
  • Mr Robin Syme and Mrs Rosemary Syme
  • Mr Ken Temperley
  • Mrs Rhonda Thiele
  • Mr Grahame Thom
  • Mrs Doris Thompson
  • Mrs Helen Todd
  • Ms Jan Twomey
  • Mr Kevin C. Underwood
  • Mr S.G. Ure Smith OAM
  • Mr Antony Waddington
  • Professor Eric Wainwright
  • Ms Nicola Walker and Mr Nick Crennan
  • Ms Shirley Warland
  • Ms Gabrielle Watt
  • Ms Margaret Watts
  • Ms Rosalie Whalen
  • Mrs Barbara White and Mr Brian White
  • Ms Helen White
  • Ms Wendy Whitham
  • Mr Doug Wickens and Mrs Betty Wickens
  • Mr Stuart Wicksteed and Mrs Pauline Wicksteed
  • Ms Lyn Williams AM
  • Ms Helen Woodger
  • Fifty-one supporters have donated anonymously.

Appendix I: Treasures Gallery Support Fund

Individuals and organisations who contribute to the Treasures Gallery Support Fund help the Library to put Australians in touch with Australia’s greatest treasures and the story of our nation’s journey. The fund enables the Library to produce imaginative access programs, provide opportunities for exploring the Treasures Gallery online and respond to inquiring young minds by developing education initiatives based on the gallery.

In 2012–13, the following people generously assisted the Library to achieve these goals:

  • Dr Desmond Bright and Dr Ruth Bright AM
  • Ms Robyn McAdam
  • Ms Cathy Pilgrim and Mr Steven Anderson.

Appendix J: Notable Acquisitions

AUSTRALIAN AND OVERSEAS PUBLICATIONS

Some of the highlights of the Library’s range of publications acquired during the year were:

  • a first edition of Comme on Dine Partout by Jacques Arago. The work, based on his circumnavigation with Freycinet, takes an ethnographic culinary voyage around the world, with chapters on the Sandwich Islands, New South Wales, China, Brazil, Patagonia and South Africa
  • a collection of Australian children’s books, comprising over 3,000 items published in Australia, written by Australian authors or about Australia, which were collected by Dr Kerry White and supported her work in compiling an extensive bibliography of Australian children’s books and as a book reviewer
  • 26 colour-illustrated Chinese propaganda posters (published c. 1950–1970s), reflecting the history of the Chinese Cultural Revolution
  • three modules of the Nineteenth Century Collections Online database, purchased for perpetual access, which comprise: British Politics and Society; Asia and the West: Diplomacy and Cultural Exchange; and British Theatre, Music and Literature: High and Popular Culture.

PICTURES

Outstanding acquisitions for the Pictures Collection included:

  • the Fairfax Archive Glass Plate Collection of 18,000 negatives from 1900 through to the 1930s. The photographs document the cultural, social and physical landscape during a period of significant change and growth in Australia
  • a sketchbook with 14 pen and ink drawings by the nineteenth-century Aboriginal artist Tommy McRae (c. 1830–1901), a Kwatkwat man from the Corowa/Yackandandah region of New South Wales and Victoria
  • a portrait of Sir George Reid (c. 1916) by Sir John Longstaff. The portrait complements the Library’s substantial holdings of Sir George Reid’s personal papers.

MANUSCRIPTS

Noteworthy acquisitions included :

  • the personal archive of Sir Sidney Nolan
  • the papers of:
    • expatriate poet the late Peter Porter OAM
    • federationist and High Court judge Sir Richard O’Connor
    • former Greens leader Dr Bob Brown
    • publisher Ms Hilary McPhee AO
    • author and academic the late Professor Bruce Bennett AO
    • Dr A. Barrie Pittock, formerly head of the CSIRO Climate Impacts Group.

MAPS

The following rare, historic acquisitions enhanced the Library’s Maps Collection:

  • three very early pocket globes, manufactured by the English globe-makers John Senex, Nathaniel Hill and Nicholas Lane. The earliest, by Senex (c. 1730) and Hill (1754), show Australia drawn according to the Dutch discoveries, while A New Globe of the Earth by N. Lane (1776) is the earliest such globe to show the track of Cook’s first voyage, with Australian and New Zealand discoveries
  • an exceedingly rare chart on vellum by Dutch East India Company cartographer Isaak de Graaf (1666–1743). The chart includes details of the Australian discoveries by the Dutch and shows routes between the Cape of Good Hope and the Sunda Strait
  • Joan Blaeu’s 1659 Archipelagus Orientalis, sive Asiaticus wall map, the first large-scale map of New Holland, on which all subsequent mapping was based, and considered to be the best map of Dutch sea power in the 1600s. The map is surrounded by explanatory text panels which include important references to Australia. The map is mounted on its original hanging fixture and is one of only four complete copies known to exist.

ORAL HISTORY

Many notable Australians were interviewed for the Oral History and Folklore Collection, including businesswoman and philanthropist Mrs Janet Holmes à Court AC, former Australian ambassadors to China Dr Stephen FitzGerald AO and Professor Ross Garnaut AO, former politicians Ms Natasha Stott Despoja AM and the late Mr Gordon Bilney, entrepreneur Mr Bob Ansett, philanthropist and engineer Mr John Grill, writer Mr Rodney Hall OAM and film producer Ms Margaret Fink.

Among a variety of social history projects, the Library recorded 33 interviews with people affected by paralytic polio, and with 12 Dutch veterans now living in Australia who served with the Royal Netherlands Army in the Netherlands East Indies.

The Oral History and Folklore Collection continues to benefit from a number of external partnerships. One such partnership, the Resilient Communities project, supported by a grant from the United States Department of State, documents resilient responses in the Australian community to the impact of overseas terrorist attacks from 2001.

The Library also acquired, from Mr Tim Bowden AM, 65 interviews recorded between 1985 and 1988 by the late Professor Hank Nelson AM with former teachers and pupils of one-teacher bush schools across rural Australia.

Glossary and Indexes

Glossary

Term

Definition

Balanced Scorecard A strategic management tool

bots

Software applications that run automatic tasks over the internet at very high speed. Also known as web robots.

Libraries Australia

A service providing information about items held by Australian libraries, used by Australian libraries for automated cataloguing and inter-lending; see librariesaustralia.nla.gov.au

logarithmic scaling

A scale of measurement in which equal distances on the scale represent equal ratios of increase; for example, with logarithmic scale to the base of 10, the numbers 10, 100 and 1,000 are shown separately by equal distances on the graph

outcomes

The results, impacts or consequences of actions by the Australian Government on the Australian community

PANDORA

Australian web archive established by the Library in 1996; see pandora.nla.gov.au

performance

The proficiency of an agency or authority in acquiring resources economically and using those resources efficiently and effectively in achieving planned outcomes

performance targets

Quantifiable performance levels or changes in level to be attained by a specific date

petabyte

1,000 terabytes

quality

Relates to the characteristics by which customers or stakeholders judge an organisation, product or service

Reimagining Libraries

An initiative of National and State Libraries Australasia, in which the Library is working with the state and territory libraries and the National Library of New Zealand to transform its library services to better meet user needs in the digital age

terabyte

1,000 gigabytes

Trove

A national discovery service implemented by the Library in November 2009, providing a single point of access to a wide range of traditional and digital content from Australian collections and global information sources

Shortened Forms

Abbreviation

Definition

AASB

Australian Accounting Standards Board

ABC

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

APS

Australian Public Service

CAC Act

Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997

CMG

Corporate Management Group

CSIRO

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

CSS

Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme

EFTPOS

Electronic Funds Transfer at Point of Sale

ERA

Electronic Resources Australia

FMOs

Finance Minister’s Orders

FOI Act

Freedom of Information Act 1982

GST

goods and services tax

ICT

information and communication technologies

IPS

Information Publication Scheme

IT

information technology

NLA

National Library of Australia

NSLA

National and State Libraries Australasia

PC

Personal computer

PSS

Public Sector Superannuation Scheme

PSSap

PSS accumulation plan

RDA

Resource Description and Access

SES

Senior Executive Service

Compliance Index

This report complies with the Commonwealth Authorities (Annual Reporting) Orders 2011 issued by the Minister for Finance and Deregulation on 22 September 2011.

Requirement

Page

Enabling legislation

Role

Legislation

Responsible Minister

Role

Ministerial directions

Public accountability

Other statutory requirements:

Public accountabiliy and
Corporate Management

Information about directors

Appendix A

Organisational structure

Organisation

Statement on governance

Corporate governance

Key activities and changes affecting the authority

Director General's Review

Judicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies

Public Accountability

Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers

Public Accountability

While not required of statutory authorities, this report also selectively complies with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Requirements for Annual Reports approved on 24 June 2013 by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsections 63(2) and 70(2) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Requirement

Page

Asset management

Corporate Management

Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines

Corporate Management

Consultants

Public Accountability

Appendix E

Financial statements

Financial Statements

Freedom of information

Public Accountability

Grant programs

Corporate Management

Purchasing

Corporate Management

Work Health and Safety

Corporate Management