Top Five eResources at the NLA

Top Five eResources at the NLA
Our most popular online resources at your fingertips
23 January 2018

One of the strengths of modern libraries is that they not only hold vast collections, but also provide access to a wide range of online materials. There is a wealth of online knowledge found through Trove, but you may not be aware of the many eResources that you can explore via the National Library's website.

Looking back at 2017, here are our top five most-used eResources for the year:

5. The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age : Library Edition

This resource allows you to view fully-digitised issues of these two newspapers, from 2006 through to the latest issue. You can search across the newspaper for specific words, or simply browse through an issue from page to page.

Sydney Morning Herald and The Age

4. Sydney Morning Herald Archives : 1955-1995

This valuable resource is extremely helpful for bridging the gap between the Sydney Morning Herald's digitised newspapers on Trove, (which runs up to the end of 1954) and more recent issues.

3. JSTOR

An academic database, particularly focusing on humanities and social sciences, that not only provides access to full-text articles from peer-reviewed journals, but also academic ebooks, and digitised archives of primary sources.

2. Ancestry - Library Edition (on-site access only)

Ancestry

One of the most popular online tools for conducting family research, and a great starting point for discovering records of your distant relatives, from historic electoral rolls to convict records to passenger lists. You can only use this resource on our computers in the reading rooms (if you can't visit us, check if you can access it at your local public library) - otherwise it would certainly be our number one popular eResource, which instead is...

1. Factiva - Australian and Overseas Newspapers

Factiva

With full-text coverage of major Australian and Overseas newspapers and journals, this resource provides access to up-to-date global news and business information.

Other e-resources worthy of an honorable mention for their popularity include:

You can access to all of these resources (with the exception of Ancestry and FindMyPast) through the eResources page, using details on your library card. Don't have a library card? If you're an Australian resident, you can get one by registering here.

Which library eResources do you find most useful? Did they make our list? Last year, we shared some of our favourite eResources for fun and profit. Feel free to share your thoughts about your favourite online resources in the comments below.

Comment: 
Trove
Comment: 
TROVE, Trove, Trove, Trove and.... you guessed it: Trove!
Comment: 
Without a doubt TROVE, I use it every day
Comment: 
Trove it is! Please keep this project funded. Linda
Comment: 
Trove
Comment: 
Oxford English Dictionary
Comment: 
I was amazed that Trove didn't feature in the Top Five. Historical research is made so much easier with this wonderful resource - but the pace of additional newspaper digitising is agonisingly slow. Not that I'm complaining...
Comment: 
TROVE! wonderful resource .
Comment: 
Trove ... British Library Newspapers .... Genealogy
Comment: 
Trove by a long shot
Comment: 
Trove, we have discovered so much more about our family history using both larger newspapers and smaller regional newspapers to research, one article was printed in newspapers in three states.
Comment: 
I found Trove very helpful
Comment: 
Trove. It’s added colour to some of the names!
Comment: 
Yep -Trove
Comment: 
Thanks for all your comments and your overwhelming appreciation of Trove – we love it too! As you are all wondering why Trove didn’t make our “Top 5” list of e-resources it is because we were highlighting those eResources that the Library subscribes to, whereas Trove is the Library’s free National discovery service. All five of these eResources provide access to knowledge and information that you won’t necessarily find on Trove – particularly by providing access to newspapers and journals from recent decades, as the case of the SMH and Age Library Edition (https://www.nla.gov.au/app/eresources/item/4616) which takes coverage of these titles up to the latest issue. We think these 5 eResources are all fantastic research tools and obviously our users do as well due to their popularity. You can explore them further, as well as all the other eResources we have available, via our eResources service (https://www.nla.gov.au/app/eresources/). Offsite access is available to registered users via a National Library card: if you don’t yet have one, you can register online (http://www.nla.gov.au/getalibrarycard/)