Libraries Australia: The Summer Sessions

November 2016-January 2017

A series of free one hour webinars for Libraries Australia members, covering topics on library visibility on the web, linked data, re-thinking resource sharing, transforming traditional services, and data management.

The evaluation infographic, capturing the facts, figures, images and voices of the participants, is now available.

Please note that the webinars will not be available for distribution after the sessions.

(Libraries Australia: The Summer Sessions flyer and program)

 

Date Time Presentation
Thursday, 10 November 2016 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Registrations have closed.

9:00AM AWST (Perth) 

 

10:30AM ACST (Darwin)

 

11:00AM AEST (Brisbane)

 

11:30AM ACDT (Adelaide)

 

12:00NOON AEDT (Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney, Hobart)

 

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 

Into the hands of the reader: improving the visibility of libraries on the web

Ted Fons

Third Chapter Partners

 

Description:

Is it possible to improve the position of library offerings (books, journals, events, programs; all of it) in search engine results?  In asking and answering that question in a research paper, Ted Fons found he needed to ask a lot of other questions: Has something been distracting us from acting on the knowledge that patrons increasingly use the web for information seeking?  What are we doing now to make libraries more visible? How does search engine indexing work and what should libraries do to make their content more valuable to the crawlers? What are vendor partners doing to help?

Ted concludes that library technologists have been distracted by a focus on the efficiency of systems rather than the needs of library users; echoing Ranganathan and Dewey’s focus on books and their readers. Ted intentionally uses the term “reader” to remind us of where we come from and whom we are here to serve.  And to remind us to focus on the customer instead of the process and tools.

In this presentation, Ted will summarize his research into these questions and welcome a conversation about his conclusions.

Thursday, 8 December 2016 

 

 

 

Registrations have closed.

2:00PM AWST (Perth) 

 

3.30PM ACST (Darwin)

 

4:00PM AEST (Brisbane)

 

4:30PM ACDT(Adelaide)

 

5:00PM AEDT (Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney, Hobart)

 

Making Connections - Creating Linked Open Library Data 

Neil Wilson

Head, Collection Metadata

The British Library

 

Description:

The British Library was one of the first national libraries to create and offer linked data in 2011 as part of its wider open data strategy. Since that point the organisation has gained considerable experience of the issues involved in the development and maintenance of a sustained linked data service.

This presentation describes

  • Why libraries are interested in offering linked data?
  • What are some of the basic concepts involved in linked data?
  • How can linked data be created from library MARC data?

 

Powerpoint (pptx, 3.76 Mb)

 

Thursday, 12 January 2017 

 

 

Registrations have closed.

2:00PM AWST (Perth) 

 

3.30PM ACST (Darwin)

 

4:00PM AEST (Brisbane)

 

4:30PM ACDT (Adelaide)

 

5:00PM AEDT (Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney, Hobart)

 

An update on the British Library’s On Demand Service 

Samantha Tillett

Head of Business Development, Information Services

The British Library

Description:

In July 2016 the British Library launched ‘British Library On Demand’ their new and improved document supply service. Samantha Tillett will outline the changing landscape that brought the British Library to transform one of their flagship services to create an on-demand service for a demanding world.  Samantha will share the British Library’s strategies for continuing to respond to the information needs of the community – highlighting the Higher Education Scanning Service - and the Library’s approach to bring rights and content together.

 

Powerpoint (pptx, 4.27 Mb)

 

Monday, 23  January 2017  

 

Registrations have closed.

9:00AM AWST (Perth) 

 

10:30AM ACST (Darwin)

 

11:00AM AEST (Brisbane)

 

11:30AM ACDT (Adelaide)

 

12:00NOON AEDT (Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney, Hobart)

 

Rethinking Resource Sharing around the World 

Sue Kaler, Beth Posner, Margaret Ellingson, Poul Erlandsen

Rethinking Resource Sharing Initiative - Steering Committee

 

Description:

In 2005 a group of librarians, library system vendors and library technology specialists in the United States realized that resource sharing (interlibrary loan) in the traditional sense was library-focused rather than customer-focused and that policies and procedures were often outdated.  An ad hoc group formed to radically rethink resource sharing in response to global internet developments and the desired focus on customer service.  The Rethinking Resource Sharing Initiative was born.

The group wrote and publicized the Rethinking Resource Sharing Manifesto encompassing these new principles.  The group expanded and developed the Rethinking Resource Sharing STAR Checklist, which is administered by the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The Checklist is a progressive list of policies and practices intended to reduce barriers between libraries and customers as well as between libraries of various types around the world.

This presentation discusses the Rethinking Resource Sharing Manifesto, the recently revised STAR Checklist and considers their impact internationally.  The emphasis is on resource sharing challenges and practical solutions from a global perspective.

 

Powerpoint (pptx, 5.52 Mb)

 

PRACTITIONER SERIES 

Aimed at data management practitioners, these sessions will give you some tools, tips and techniques to support your data maintenance activities – for local data quality improvement and to ensure that your library’s data is in the best shape possible before contributing to the Australian National Bibliographic Database (ANBD).

Friday, 10 February 2017  

Registrations have closed.

11:00AM AWST (Perth) 

 

12:30AM ACST (Darwin)

 

1:00PM AEST (Brisbane)

 

1:30PM ACDT (Adelaide)

 

2:00PM AEDT (Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney, Hobart)

 

Be your own data mechanic: a general overview of MarcEdit as a data manipulation tool
Terry Reese
Creator of MarcEdit
Head of Digital Initiatives
The Ohio State University Libraries
 

 

Powerpoint (pptx, 3.82 Mb)

Friday, 24 February 2017
Registrations have closed.
11:00AM AWST (Perth) 

 

12:30AM ACST (Darwin)

 

1:00PM AEST (Brisbane)

 

1:30PM ACDT (Adelaide)

 

2:00PM AEDT (Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney, Hobart)

Build your toolbox: In depth data manipulation with MarcEdit to prepare your data for the ANBD 

Terry Reese
Creator of MarcEdit
Head of Digital Initiatives
The Ohio State University Libraries

 

Powerpoint (pptx, 978 Kb)

 

Speakers

Ted Fons

Ted is a librarian with twenty plus years serving libraries and the organizations that support them.   He is globally recognized as an expert in library workflows and bibliographic metadata.  Most recently, Ted held the position of Executive Director of Data Services at OCLC.   In that role Ted provided vision and direction for OCLC’s global metadata network–that included the operational management and strategic planning for WorldCat.  During that time, he participated in OCLC Research’s experiments with linked data and as well as the BIBFRAME Early Experimenters project.

Previously, Ted was a senior product manager and Director of Customer Services at Innovative Interfaces.  During this time, Ted conceived and launched the ground-breaking Electronic Resources Management (ERM) product; the first such system offered to the library marketplace.

Ted was on the organizing committee for the IFLA Linked Data Satellite meeting in Chicago in August, 2016.  He has a particular interest in the research and experimentation on improving the exposure and relevance of libraries on the web.  Ted’s MLS is from Syracuse University.

 

Neil Wilson

Neil Wilson has an MA in Library and Information Studies from University College London and has worked as a cataloguer, systems developer and library manager for over 30 years. Currently he is Head of Collection Metadata at the British Library where he is responsible for the institution’s open metadata strategy. He represents the British Library and IFLA on several library standards and book trade supply chain bodies including: Book Industry Communication (BIC), EDItEUR, the RDA Board and the ISBN Agency Board.

 

Samantha Tillett

Samantha Tillett is the Head of Business Development, Information Services at the British Library and has worked at the British Library since 1989. Sam worked in document supply for many years, starting in the stacks, worked briefly as a cataloguer of grey literature, and then worked in customer services and sales, she then went on to help set up the UK Research Reserve (UKRR). Sam was Strategic Relationship Manager at the British Library, working with strategic partners such as Cengage Gale, Amazon, JISC and Bibliolabs to make digitised, public domain content more accessible via new platforms (e.g. JISC Historic Books, NCCO), new technology (award winning 19th Century Books app for the iPad) and new publishing technologies (print on demand and eBooks). Sam has now returned to document supply as Head of Business Development.

 

Rethinking Resource Sharing Initiative – Steering Committee

Margaret Ellingson

Margaret Ellingson is Head of Interlibrary Loan and Course Reserves at the Woodruff Main and Health Sciences Libraries of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Margaret is a past chair of STARS, the Sharing and Transforming Access to Resources Section of ALA’s Reference and User Services Association (RUSA), and has served on many ALA committees. In particular, she has participated in the revision of several resource sharing guidelines, including the latest revision of the Interlibrary Loan Code for the United States and its explanatory supplement. Margaret also serves on the Steering and Innovation Award Committees of the Rethinking Resource Sharing Initiative. Her most recent article is “Does Your Data Deliver for Decision Making? New Directions for Resource Sharing Assessment,” co-authored by Collette Mac and Charla Lancaster Gilbert (Interlending & Document Supply 41:4 (2013), 1-12.

Poul Erlandsen

In 2009 Poul Erlandsen joined the Royal Library / Copenhagen University Library in Denmark as head of the Interlibrary Loan / Document Delivery Section. Before that he held a position as head of Document Access Services at the National Library of Education also in Copenhagen, Denmark. Poul has a long experience in the field of resource sharing. From 2004 to 2007 he chaired the IFLA Document Delivery and Resource Sharing Standing Committee and in 2009-2010 he chaired the Rethinking Resource Sharing Initiative Steering Committee. He is currently chairing the ALA International Interlibrary Loan Committee. Active in the library world since 1980, Poul has served on several national and international committees. He was until July 2015 chairing the OCLC EMEA (Europe, the Middle East and Africa) Regional Council and is an EMEA delegate to the OCLC Global Council until June 2019.

Sue Kaler

Sue Kaler is the Interlibrary Loan Manager at the Massachusetts Library System, running an operation that borrows for approximately 500 requesting libraries and lends from approximately 80 libraries. Sue is active in ALA’s RUSA STARS, currently serving as a member of the Codes, Guidelines and Technical Standards Committee which recently revised the Interlibrary Loan Code for the United States. Sue is chair of the Rethinking Resource Sharing Initiative Steering Committee and is often a voice for smaller public libraries when working with her ILL colleagues.

Beth Posner

Beth Posner is the Head of Library Resource Sharing at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She is an active member and past Chair of the Steering Committee of the Rethinking Resource Sharing Initiative and the current Chair of the Rethinking Resource Sharing Policies Committee of ALA RUSA STARS. She is also the Training Coordinator of The IDS Project and an IDS Mentor. Beth writes about interlibrary loan services and is currently editing a collection, Library and Information Resource Sharing: Transforming Services and Collections, to be published by Libraries Unlimited, about how through innovative ILL work, and in conjunction with all other library services and functions, librarians are helping each other to serve our communities and facilitate access to information.

 

Terry Reese

As the Head of Digital Initiatives at The Ohio State University Libraries (OSUL), Terry is charged with designing and managing strategic initiatives related to the development and implementation of the Libraries digital libraries infrastructure, as well as providing guidance related to the Ohio State University Libraries’ universal discovery and preservation service initiatives. This responsibility ranges from coordination and implementation of new services, to representing the Libraries at national and international events pertaining to such issues as the development of standards and best practices related to the development and evolution of digital library practices. In this role, Terry builds relationships across the Libraries and with our peer institutions, to understand how the digital library environment is evolving and work to place OSUL in the best position to support not just our current service model, but anticipate and support the Libraries’ mission into the future. As the Head of Digital Initiatives, Terry works with many colleagues from around the Libraries to evaluate how OSUL can provide the digital services, access, and necessary preservation infrastructure that the Libraries and our community have come to expect.

Prior to his tenure at The Ohio State University Libraries, Terry served for 14 years at the Oregon State University Libraries (ORSTL) in a variety of roles. At the ORSTL, Terry held positions as a Library Technician cataloging cartographic materials (prior to receiving his Masters of Library Science (MLS)), as the Digital Production Unit Head where Terry oversaw all digitization efforts in the Libraries as well as supervised both faculty and non-faculty, and finally as the Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services where Terry served on the Libraries senior administrative team.

Terry earned his Masters of Library Science from Florida State University in 2002, having previously earned a Bachelors of Arts in English from the University of Oregon in 1999.