Wanted! 2016 Federal Election Ephemera

A badge with a love heart and federal election ephemera written on it

Australians are bombarded with campaign material during elections—flyers, policy statements, how-to-vote cards, balloons, banners, posters, and the list goes on. But instead of throwing it away please help us collect it.

We add original printed campaign material to our holdings for each Australian federal election, and are particularly interested  material from marginal electorates, communities with concerns about health services, industrial relations, education, the mining industry and climate change. WE are keen to collect material from regional or remote electorates as well as those in the metropolitan centres.

If you, your friends and/or relatives have access to this material (we want published original material, not photocopies or digital files) send it to us to add to the national collection:

 

 

Ephemera Officer
Printed Australiana - National Library of Australia
Reply Paid 83281
PARKES ACT 2600

You can also drop-off material at the Library, please phone the Ephemera Officer 02  6262 1180 before you visit.

The PANDORA Archive archives election-based websites—those hosted by registered parties and lobby groups. Send through your suggested site/s for archiving to the Web Archiving Team.

Your help in assisting us to collect and preserve this important documentary record is greatly appreciated.

Why we collect

We aim to collect printed federal election campaign materials as comprehensively as possible—one copy of all published leaflets, handbills, posters, policy speeches, press statements, pamphlets, letters and reports to constituents, novelties and how-to-vote cards: in other words, all printed matter produced by individual candidates, political parties and lobby groups in the run-up to the vote.

Explore the finding aid to Federal election campaign ephemera, 1901-2014 (PDF, 370KB).

Political ephemera provides a unique perspective into Australia’s social life and political landscape—the rise and fall of policies, issues, parties and careers. The way in which these sorts of documentary heritage items are presented to the electorate by parties, candidates and lobby groups is in and of itself interesting to researchers—the papers and colours used, dye-cut and printing finishes, variations in size/proportion of the stickers, buttons, posters, handbills or letters—as well of course as the messages contained within.