Myth-busting Trove corrects record

old building

Parliament House, Spring Street, Melbourne at the time of the Federation celebrations, May 1901. http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/227707087

The truth is out there – just waiting for Trove to find it.

Trove is proving to be more than just a vicarious time machine or a research tool, its users are discovering real power in the way it can set the record straight and bust myths.

Looking for Rose Paterson

I first discovered the letters of Banjo Paterson's mother Rose—around which my new book Looking for Rose Paterson: How Family Bush Life Nurtured Banjo the Poet is based—in the course of my PhD research some 16 years ago. I was searching the National Library's Manuscript Collections for correspondence and diaries that might provide evidence about what kind of music Australian pioneer women played, and where and when they performed.

Women landed vital wartime role

Photograph from the Australian Women's Weekly of 24 April 1943 shows Dulcie Edwards working as a logger. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46447618

What did you do in the war, Mummy?

A whole lot more than most people think, or remember, according to some Trove-driven research emerging out of New England, in northern New South Wales.

Stop the presses

‘To-day we send broadcast throughout the colonies the first number of THE BULLETIN … The aim of the proprietors is to establish a journal which cannot be beaten – excellent in the illustrations which embellish its pages and unsurpassed in the vigor [sic], freshness and geniality of its literary contributions. To this end the services of the best men of the realms of pen and pencil in the colony have been secured and, fair support conceded, THE BULLETIN will assuredly become the very best and most interesting newspaper published in Australia.’

Dead ends

We like to celebrate when we find elusive pictures, articles or references and our Ask a Librarian blogs highlight these success stories, but unfortunately, not every question has a happy ending. Here are a few queries that presented me with some difficulties and disappointments.

A uniform for a dapper diplomat

During my research for Badge, Boot, Button: The Story of Australian Uniforms, I looked at one of the many curious treasures in the National Library's collection: a large metal trunk painted red and black, with a label engraved ‘P. Shaw Esq'. Inside the trunk, folds of black wool and a burst of feathers resolve themselves into a uniform decorated with gold braid and topped with a plumed bicorn hat.

A century of Tasmanian news

Guest blogger Ian Morrison from LINC Tasmania shares some highlights from the newly digitised Tasmanian newspapers.

The latest Tasmanian additions to Trove, funded by the Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office, include more than 30 titles, spanning the 1820s to the 1920s. Trove now provides access to more than 100 of the approximately 130 newspapers published in Tasmania before 1954.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Researchers