Learning videos including past Learning webinar recordings and Discovery videos are available below and with closed captions. 

Transcripts are available by clicking the word "Transcriptions" below each video 

These videos are also available on our YouTube channel from the 'Learning Webinars' playlist.

Welcome to our webinar on Chinese-Australian family history. My name is Bing.

And my name is Leisa. We are reference librarians here at the National Library.

We would like to start by acknowledging Australia's First Nations Peoples, The First Australians, as the traditional owners and custodians of this land

and give respects to the elders, past and present, and through them to all Australian, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

You may be joining us because you've heard the family stories of a Chinese ancestor in Australia or you've come across a document of a descendant with a Chinese name.

Perhaps you've recently discovered a photograph of an ancestor, or even taken a DNA test, or simply

just want to learn more about your Asian roots in Australia. Whatever your reason, we hope this webinar will get

you started on researching your Chinese ancestors in Australia.

Like any good family history research, you should start with yourself and work backwards.

It is best to work from the known to the unknown. Start by writing your name, your full name, date and place of birth

followed by your parent's full name, date and place of birth. Then your grandparents, full name, place of birth and so forth.

You might like to watch our five minute webinar and how to start your family history. For more information, visit our Getting Started

page found on our Family History Research Guide. To identify your Chinese ancestors

in Australia and you will need their names. This can be the most challenging part of your research

if your ancestors arrived before the 1950s. Like so many immigrants from non-English speaking backgrounds, names

may have been incorrectly transcribed and there were so many different spelling variations in how names were recorded.

Chinese names usually comprise two or three Chinese characters, sometimes four.

A family name goes before given name. Chinese migrants may swap their names around to suit Western conventions.

But if you are having no luck with finding official records using their names, try searching under their first names.

Your Chinese ancestor could have also anglicised their first or family name.

So, keeping the record of different name variations, is important.

It is not uncommon to find Chinese personal names having an 'Ah' or 'A'

in Australian records such as Ah Chin or Ah Foon. This prefix doesn't have a meaning.

It's added before a given name in spoken language to express familiarity. It is a very informal way to address a person;

just like using a nickname. However, the prefix was often entered into documentation

and, in some cases, combined with a given name to become one word.

Children are normally given their father's family name, but a Chinese married woman may have kept their maiden name.

To successfully check your family back to China you will also need to identify your ancestors Chinese names

and the villages they originally came from. This can be difficult, but we will talk about some of the resources

that might be helpful later in the presentation. Once you've identified or collected all the possible names

your ancestors may have used, you can start searching for records, deciding what records to access and where to locate them.

Records created at the time your ancestor was alive will be the most reliable.

Our Family History Research Guide will provide you with a good starting point on what we hold and what resources you can access.

State and Territory Libraries also hold a range of family history resources.

Before we delve into useful resources. Let us provide you with an overview of early Chinese migration to Australia

to give you a better context of why and how your ancestors may have arrived in Australia.

The first people from China to settle in Australia were probably a very small group of settlers and domestic servants.

Mak Sai Ying is the first documented Chinese immigrant to Australia.

Although it is believed Chinese immigration may have occurred much earlier.

Born in Canton, the now Guangdong province of China, Mak Sai Ying,

who was also known as John Shying and a few other names, arrived

in New South Wales about the ship, Laurel, in 1818.

In the late 1840s, Chinese laborers were transported to Australia on indentured

labour contracts by British Merchant under the, so-called, Coolie Trade

as a response to a labor shortage in Australia. The ship Nimrod brought in the first group

of 120 Chinese laborers from Amoy, now known as Xiamen on the 2nd of October, 1848.

After that, more and more ships carrying Chinese laborers arrived at different Australian ports.

Amoy, or Xiamen, is located on the south-eastern coast of China in the Fujian province,

or Hokkein, as it was previously known. From 1845, it was a major departure

port for transporting Chinese laborers overseas. So, those earliest Chinese migrants were generally from Hokkien.

From 1848 to the early 1850s, over 3000 Chinese workers were transported

to Australia to boost the labor force here. On arrival they were hired to work in pastoral

properties and rural areas. From 1852, the shipment of Chinese

laborers was shifted to ports in other areas such as Canton, Macao and Hong Kong.

Therefore, most Chinese migrants who arrived in 1850 and 1860s

for the gold rush were from Canton and the now Guandong Province.

This is an 1853 map of China held at the National Library. Canton is in South China, borders Hong Kong and Macao.

The capital city of this province is also known as Canton. But most migrants came from villages in districts

such as Sze Yup, that are outside the city.

The majority of Chinese migrants returned to their home villages by the 1880s after the Gold Rush.

By the time of Australian Federation, there were about 30,000 Chinese

in Australia. The number of Chinese arrivals arrivals declined significantly in the first half of the 20th century

and in 1947 the Chinese population numbered some 12,000.

Perhaps the record that most people want to discover is the name of the ship their ancestors arrived on and when it arrived.

Uncovering the reasons why your descendants migrated to Australia can often just be as fascinating.

Did they arrive to try their luck in the New South Wales or Victorian Goldfields? Were they part of the indentured Amoy laborers

who worked on pastoral stations in the late 1840s to the early 1850s?

Did they arrive as a crew member on board a ship? Passenger records can be very useful,

can be a very useful source of information for family history research. Records could include the

passengers full name date, place of arrival, name of ship, age, occupation,

country of origin, marital status, a wealth of information for any family historian.

However, early records could be limited to the content and may be confined to the family name and just an initial with no given name or title such a

Mr. or Mrs. with no other information. This, of course, can make it difficult to confirm

if the passenger record is the person you're searching for. As with any original historical record, mistakes occurred.

This was even more prevalent in passengers from non-English speaking backgrounds. Names could have been misheard due to a transcriber

not being familiar with Chinese names or pieces of information could have been misheard.

Passengers sometimes provide aliases and did not always know their age

or were not truthful for various reasons: to avoid law or military enlistment.

As Bing mentioned earlier, it was customary for Chinese immigrants to provide their name first, followed by their given names.

So document takers could have recorded the passengers under their first name instead of their family name.

There is a vast array of shipping and immigration records available.

Before you start your research, it is best to have an understanding of how these records are arranged.

Prior to 1924, the administration record recording of shipping and passenger arrivals was the responsibility of Australian colonies or state.

The surviving original records are now held at the State Archives or Public Records Office

and are arranged by passenger type, such as an assisted passenger:

this is this was when the passenger's fare was paid for by the government or by an employee or a family member.

Or perhaps they were an unassisted passenger who paid their own fare.

Or they could have arrived as a crew member on board a ship. These are just a few passenger record types.

Some state archives, such as the Public Records Office of Victoria and the State Records Office of South Australia,

have digitised historical passenger records and have made them freely available on their websites.

Family history databases such as Ancestry and Find My Past have also digitised various Australian passenger arrival records.

You can access these databases on site within the National Library building, or you may want to contact your local library to find out

if they subscribe to these databases. From 1924,

immigration became the responsibility of the Commonwealth Government. As a result, all subsequent records relating to immigration,

passenger arrivals, departure records and naturalisation records are housed at the National Archives of Australia.

The National Archives of Australia has published an excellent online guides. These detailed guides focus on records that would be of most interest

to family historians and researchers of Chinese-Australian history.

There is also an abundance of records relating to entry departure, island registration, student records

and other travel documentation that was passed to Chinese-Australians during the colonial period through to the 20th century.

These can be highly useful as they may contain Chinese and English names as well as birthplaces or district of origin.

Before citizenship began in Australia, on 26th January 1949, immigrants

from non-British countries could apply for naturalisation. It was not compulsory, but it did offer incentives

such as the right to vote and purchase land. Immigrants needed to be in the country

for at least five years before they could apply to be naturalised. Naturalisation

records often provide a wealth of information for family historians tracing their Chinese-Australian roots.

Generally, records include the full name, date and namer of ship, country of origin, age and occupation.

Naturalisation records from 1904 become a Commonwealth responsibility and records are held at the National Archives.

Pre-1904 naturalisation records for Victoria and South Australia, also held in the National Archives.

You may like to do a name search via our catalog for any digitised records.

Records created before 1904 in New South Wales, Queensland, Western Australia and Tasmania

are housed by the State Archives. For those whose ancestors were in New South Wales, the Chinese

Naturalisation Database, New South Wales 1857 to 1887, hosted by La Trobe University, is part of the Chinese Heritage

of Australian Federation Project, may be useful. The university's Chinese-Australian page

brings together many useful databases and indexes, including a list of indentured Chinese labourers in prior

years identified in New South Wales 1828 to 1856. Explore their resources page to find out more.

Certificates of Exemption from the Dictation Test is a wonderful resource for anyone searching for Chinese immigrants.

From 1904 to 1959, these certificate were issued to Chinese people who departed Australia

and wanted to return without having to take a dictation test. Once the certificate was issued,

the immigrants had three years to return to Australia, not only will the certificates contain a person's particulars,

but will also include a photograph and fingerprint. Certificates are held at the National Archive of Australia.

Some are digitised. Here's an example of a certificates for Florrie Lee Hang Gong,

found on their website. You can access an online index to Victorian certificates

through the Chinese-Australian family historians of Victoria. Birth dates and marriage records are a vital part of any family history research.

They can provide important details about your ancestor, such as a full name birthplace, date, age, occupation,

spouse, name and family members. Historical death certificates for New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria

will even identify where the deceased was born and how long they had been living in the colony.

You never know if a hidden but important piece of information will be on a birth, death or marriage certificate.

Certificates can be purchased from the relevant state or territory births, deaths and marriage registry office.

Search online to find websites. The National Library and State Libraries

hold historical births, deaths and marriage indexes.. Check out our Australian birth, death and marriage

research guide for more information. In addition to birth, deaths and marriage records, cemetery records, tombstones

and burial plots can often provide additional details and may be inscribed in Chinese language within Australia.

Dr. Kok Hu Jin is well known for his dedication to transcribing

and interpreting Chinese language inscriptions on monuments and cemetery headstones.

He has published a series of work which includes histories, Chinese cemetery maps, indexes and names,

birth and death dates, birth places and ancestral villages. His publications are held by many libraries

and collecting institutions throughout Australia and many of his indexes are freely available online through the Chinese in Australia page

found on the Family Search website.

Electoral rolls can be a great way to find out more about your ancestors.

You can find out the residential address of a person and help locate other family members living at the same address for a certain year.

You can also find out the occupation of a person which may prompt further investigation into business or company records.

As mentioned earlier, Chinese immigrants needed to be naturalised before they could vote or be listed on any records.

The voter also needed to be over 21. The age was lowered to 18 in 1973.

Let's have a look at an example of an electoral roll. Australian Commonwealth Electoral Rolls up to 2008 are available

from the National Library and State and Territory Libraries. Some electoral rolls have been digitised and accessible via Ancestry

and my past databases each providing different years. As mentioned earlier,

you can access these databases on site in the National Library or contact your local library to find out if they subscribe to these databases.

Post office directories can be useful as an alternative for electoral rolls,

especially if your Chinese ancestors were not naturalised or able to vote.

They were published annually and included a list of people by town streets, name, occupation and business.

We hold directories in print, microfiche and electronic format. You can find a list of directories by state and territory on "Our family

history resources" guide, available from our Family History Research Guide.

We have digitised the New South Wales Wise's Post Office directories from 1887 to 1950 and have them

freely accessible from home through Trove. Your State Library may also have directories in their collection.

Newspapers can be a fantastic way to discover an array of information about an ancestor.

You can search for a birth, death and marriage notice, employment or business details, discover residential addresses, find out

if someone served in the war, court cases, immigration and property purchases.

Newspapers can also provide a great social history about the area in the time that they lived.

This interview, published in the Adelaide Observer on the 7th of April 1888

with successful Chinese merchant Way Lee, explores topics such as Chinese migration, family structures, the poll tax,

the Chinese labor market in Australia, and his public negotiations to supply Chinese laborers

to the Daly River plantation in the Northern Territory. The Chinese Wesleyan Mission Minister in Adelaide, Reverend

Hargreaves, acts as an interpreter for this interview. It is a great reflection of issues and topics surrounding Chinese immigrants,

such as the poll tax that was imposed on Chinese immigrants upon their arrival to Australia.

Our newspaper collections include historic and modern newspapers, accessible online, as well as newspapers in microfilm and paper formats.

You may like to check out our Australian newspapers and overseas newspapers research guide for more information.

We not only hold mainstream Australian newspapers, but also multiple runs of Chinese community newspapers, which we'll go into later.

You can find out what we hold in our catalogue. Searches can be made

by title or place of publication. If the name of a newspaper is known, search by title.

Such as "Ballarat Courier" and use the drop down button to select the title field and limit search such as to newspapers.

Click on the find button. You will notice results can be refined, using options located on the right side of the

screen, such as decade. To locate newspapers if a title is not known,

type in a town city, state or country, followed by the word "newspapers", for example, "Perth newspapers" or "Western

Australian newspapers", and use the drop down button to select newspapers.

Then click on the find button. You will find results can be limited using options like on the right side.

You can even select newspapers in different languages. One of our fantastic resources for family history research is Trove.

You can search the books and libraries category to try to find out if a library closer to you holds a newspaper title that you're after.

For example, I searched for a Darwin newspaper but didn't know the title. You could simply type "Darwin newspaper" into the books and library category

and click on Find, limit the decade that you're after and select the relevant record and scroll down

to find a list of libraries in Australia that hold this title. Trove has also digitised newspapers.

Begin with a simple name search such as "Anne Chung Gon" or "Anne Chung Gon + Launceston".

Watch our short "Getting started on Trove" video on the Trove help page for search tips.

The Chinese communities in Australia started to publish newspapers of their own voices in the 1890s.

Some early Chinese language newspapers included the Chinese Australian Herald,

the first major Chinese newspaper in Australia, which was published between 1894 and 1923 in Sydney.

The Tung Wah newspapers, which was also published in Sydney and Melbourne's first major Chinese newspaper.

The Chinese Times,, which runs from 1902 to 1922. There's a wealth of information about the individual

and collective lives of Chinese immigrants in these newspapers. Trove offers access to a

digitised version of these earliest Chinese language newspapers. It allows you to browse the newspapers online and search within the newspapers.

Unlike many traditional Western newspapers, they are less likely to publish family notices,

but occasionally death notices were placed in these newspapers to notify the community of the death of a person,

especially when the person was a notable member of the community. Major Chinese newspapers like the Tung Wah

Times were active community organisations. They spoke for the community, organised fundraising activities

to support their ancestral homeland in China and performed all kind of social functions to assist the community in various ways.

You will find numerous business notices, shipping timetables, local news articles and various community notices

containing information on people's names and villages of origin.

You will be pleased to know that the Tung Wah Times has been indexed in English,

which allows you to search without knowing the Chinese language. The Tung Wah newspaper index is also available through

Latrobe University website.

Chinese Australians have served in Australia Defence Forces and made noteworthy contributions during conflicts such as the Boer War,

World War One, World War Two, Korean and Vietnam Wars. While there is a long record of Australians with Chinese ancestry

serving in defence forces, even prior to the 20th century, at a time when Australian born children of Chinese settlers

facing significant racial intolerance, persecution and social exclusion.

Although the presence of Chinese-Australians throughout Australia may not be as well known

to the general Australian public, websites such as World War Two Chinese Australian Soldiers Honour Roll created by the Chinese Museum

and the Chinese Anzacs published by the Australian War Memorial, honours these servicemen and women.

Defence service records can be accessed from the National Archives of Australia. Simply visit their website and type in the name of the serviceman

or woman into the record search box. You may even find a record that you're after

is digitised and freely available online. Due to the prejudice some Chinese-Australians faced

when trying to enlist, they may have anglicised their names or used the family name of their mother

if they were European. This is the reason why it can be useful to keep a list of name variation

for your ancestors to keep in mind as you search.

There are a number of wonderful works that capture the Chinese-Australians' wartime. Search of books and libraries category in Trove to find a library closer to you

that holds these books or similar ones. The National Library is a great place to start your family history research

not only because we provide access to the many archival records mentioned earlier, but also because of our strong, published

and unpublished collections that help you gain a better understanding of the Chinese community, their shared memories,

and the cultural and historical context that may influence your research.

The library has an excellent collection of published family histories and secondary sources created by scholars,

historians and Chinese Australian genealogy organisations. For example, the multi-volume Cantonese Students Record

by Dr. Su Mingxian. In the early 20th century, young Chinese were allowed to come to Australia and to study.

Most who came were children or relatives of people already living in Australia and were mostly Cantonese.

These books to cover biographical information of each student, their family connections in Australia, copies of original records

such as students, passports and indexes of the students. This is the first volume of the set focusing on students

coming from the Zhongshan District of Cannton. The Library also offers a range of resources

about ancestral homelands of Chinese immigrants, including local gazetteers, journals, newspapers and maps.

You may also be interested in exploring the Library's Chinese oral history and manuscripts collections.

They provide a unique insight into the lives and experiences of Chinese-Australian people.

Our oral history collection includes interviews with family members of a number of first generation migrants.

One such interview is with Joyce Lee, who was born in 1916.

She was the daughter of Jin Jiang Henry, the late business owner of Henry and Company.

In her interview, she shared memories of her father, who first mined for tin in Wellborough, in Tasmania,

and established his wholesale and retail fruit and vegetable business.

The story of businessmen within William Liu, born in 1893, is just another example.

He describes his return to Australia in 1909 from Hong Kong. He speaks of his studies.

The white Australian policy and his involvement with community matters around Melbourne.

This oral history interview and its transcript is digitised and available on Trove.

Voice of William Liu: Now back to my 1912 to 1914 years in Melbourne.

It was very like, very much like I was back in my father's relatives' Taisin Village.

T.A.I.S.I.N. village. There [Melbourne], you could say I had lead a peasant's life,

a village peasant's life very much as if I was born there. I went there, couldn't speak English.

Within months, I suppose, a year or so, I began to feel, you know, one of them.

And so much so., and the dialect that I learned in Taisan

was mostly spoken in Melbourne in the Chinese community.

So, I was in my element. Our manuscript collection contain valuable materials

such as personal papers, correspondence, diaries and more.

The Letterbooks of Cheok Hong Cheong, include seven volumes of letters by the Chinese missionary.

He was born in China in about 1853 and came to Ballarat in the 1850s

with his father, who was also a missionary.

The Library's pictures collection, comprising photographs, prints, drawing, paintings,

postcards and objects, much of it digitised, documents the various aspects of the lives of Chinese-Australians.

You can find historical images of buildings such as the Chinese boarding house owned by William A Sac, in Gulgong,

New South Wales 1872, and John Aloo's Chinese restaurant in Ballarat.

Different Chinese huts and, of course, Chinatowns.

You can also find images that document events such as the Chinese parade in 1901, a Chinese funeral

and a puppet show to celebrate the Chinese New Year. There are also portrait photographs of many

Chinese migrants.

As a case study will explore the family history of Chee Dock and Mary Nomchong, pictured here in 1930.

Chee Dock Ng and Boo Jung Gew married in 1887 in Hong Kong.

This was Chee Dock's second marriage. His eldest son, George, was the son of his first wife who died in China.

We hold a photograph of Boo Jung's wedding dress seen here modelled by her daughter, Ellen, who was also known as 'Nell',

shortly after their marriage. The newlyweds arrived in Australia and settled in Braidwood in New South Wales in 1887.

Priorto this, Che Dock had been living in California and came to Australia to join his brother Shoon Foon, born in 1877.

His brother was a storekeeper on the Mongarlowe Goldfields, located just outside of Braidwood and encouraged Chee Dock's move to Australia.

Chee Dock agreed and the two brothers soon became business partners in Mongarlowe. Chee Dock was naturalised in 1882.

The original record is held at the State Records of New South Wales, but we had copies of New South Wales naturalisation certificates

in microform format as part of the State Records of New South Wales Archives Resource Collection.

As you can see, his family name was documented as Dock and his first name as Chee.

Chee Dock had returned to China in 1886 to marry Boo Jung.

Like his brother, Shoon Foon, Chee Dock anglicised, his surname from Ng to Nomchong.

His wife, Boo Jung, echoed this and changed her name to Mary Nomchong.

The Nomchong names means 'Southern Prosperity', and it's believed that this was the name of the business

which Shoon Foon later adopted as his surname.

Chee Dock took over the Mongarlowe store later and sold the business after his brother died and established a store in Braidwood.

According to articles found on our archive websites, in Trove, this store remained in the Nomchong family until 1980.

You can discover listings for the store in Wallace Street in Wise's New South Wales Post Office Directories up

until the 1950s. We hold a photograph of the business taken in 1940.

Those of you who know Braidwood will recognise this building on the corner of Wallace Street.

The sign reads and M. Nomchong and, according to this 1930 article, the company owners were Mary and Chee Dock and their children: Paul,

Leopold and Mary M Nomchong.

Chee Dock and Mary had 14 children in Braidwood, raising 13 children into adulthood.

Chee Docks son, George, from his first marriage, remained in China with his grandparents for many years and reunited

with his family in Australia as an adult. Although Chee Dock was naturalised in 1882,

George was not exempt from the Immigration Act 1901. Consequently, George was deported back to China.

A fantastic 2014 blog by Kate Bagnall titled 'Celestial City: Misunderstanding

of the Administration of Immigration Restriction', available in the archived website section in Trove outlines

how Chee Dock made a request to the Australian Government that his son be allowed back into the country

and even present a large petition signed by the residents of Braidwood, asking for a special consideration to be given.

George was eventually issued with a certificate exemption from the dictation test in 1913,

which was extended several times. He remained in Australia until his death in 1970.

The Dr. Su Mingxian books mentioned by Bing earlier revealed an article on Chee Dock held in the Cantonese Student Archives.

According to this article, Chee Dock had applied for a Chinese student passport visa in 1921 for his grandson, Thomas Nomchong,

who was George's son. From these documents, Bing was able to determine that Chee Dock's

original Chinese family name was, in fact, Wu. In addition to this, Bing uncovered the family originate from the small

village of Wenlou in the Xinhui district of Guangdong, China. An unexpected but invaluable find.

Chee Dock and Mary's individual death notices demonstrate how much they would love the respect in the community.

Even in 1977, the Braidwood Historical Society celebrated the centenary of Chee's arrival to the town

by organising a community dinner on the 19th of November 1977.

They presented each guest with a souvenir booklet entitled 'The Centenary of Nomchong Family in Braidwood,

1877 to 1977'. There is a wonderful full page article in the Tallaganda

Times on the 23rd November 1977 about the dinner.

The article provides a write up about the Nomchong's family arrival to Australia and their history in Braidwood.

Undeniably, this Chinese immigrant family was embraced by the town and, enriched the community by sharing their cultural heritage.

This is just one story across Australia. We would be interested in hearing your family's immigrant stories.

For more information, visit our collecting Chinese or Australian Stories page.

We have really only be able to scratch the surface, but we hope that this has been helpful to anyone

getting started. If you need help moving forward, there are a number

of excellent associations with a great deal of expertise such as Chinese-Australian Family Historians of Victoria,

Australian-Chinese Community Association of New South Wales, Chinese-Australian Historical Society.

We also have our own Ask a Librarian service. While we can't do extensive, ongoing research for you,

we can provide research assistance if you hit a brick wall. Happy researching.

CITATION LIST:

Citation list (in order of appearance):

·       Foelsche, P. (1873). Chinese wood-carter, Darwin, North Australia. http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-141834954

·       (1895). [Portrait of unidentified Chinese fruit and vegetable hawker with baskets of produce]. http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-140626205

·       (1907). Portrait of Maud Shing, Canterbury, N.S.W., 1907. http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-147021636

·       Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate. issuing body. (). A group of young women from the Chinese Youth Group and a girl standing in front of the N.S.W. Railway Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, October 1943 from http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-462437807

·       Certificates of Exemption from Dictation Test and Hand print - NAA - https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=7461127

·       Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate. issuing body. (). Members of the Chinese Youth Group having a formal dinner, Sydney, New South Wales, October 1943 http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-462438116

·       (1818, February 28). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), p. 4. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page493698

·       (1848, July 29). The Moreton Bay Courier (Brisbane, Qld. : 1846 - 1861), p. 2. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page541146 Williams, S. Wells. & Atwood, John M.

·       (1853). Map of the Chinese Empire : compiled from native & foreign authorities. https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-1992690410

·       Grosse, Frederick. (1873). Arrival of Chinese immigrants in Little Bourke Street. http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136140335

·       Shipping Records: Public Records Office of Victoria: https://prov.vic.gov.au/explore-collection/explore-topic/passenger-records-and-immigration Ah See - Naturalisation record - https://records-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo-explore/fulldisplay?context=L&vid=61SRA&lang=en_US&docid=INDEX1423102

·       NLA collection of cemetery records by Dr. Hu Jin Kok: https://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Search/Home?lookfor=Hu+Jin+Kok&type=author&limit%5B%5D=&submit=Find

·       (1909). Wise's New South Wales post office directory. http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-522689844

·       (1888, April 7). Adelaide Observer (SA : 1843 - 1904), p. 26. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page18928849

·       Guang yi hua bao - The Chinese Australian Herald (Sydney, NSW: 1894-1923) http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-title704

·       Chinese Times (Melbourne, Vic: 1902-1922): http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-title705

·       Tung Wah Times (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1936): http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-title1184

·       Kennedy, Alastair.  (2012).  Chinese Anzacs : Australians of Chinese descent in the defence forces 1885-1919.  [O'Connor, A.C.T :  A. Kennedy]

·       Chiu, Edmond. & Soh-Lim, Adil. & Museum of Chinese Australian History.  (2021).  For honour and country : Victorian Chinese Australians in World War II.  Melbourne, VIC :  Museum of Chinese Australian History

·       NLA collection of works by Su Mingxian: https://catalogue.nla.gov.au/Search/Home?lookfor=Su+Mingxian&type=author&limit%5B%5D=&submit=Find

·       Lee, Joyce Therese. & Giese, Diana.  (2000).  Joyce Lee interviewed by Diana Giese in the Chinese Australian Oral History Partnership collection.

·       Liu, William J. L. & De Berg, Hazel.  (1978).  William Liu interviewed by Hazel de Berg.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-222787139

·       Cheong, Cheok Hong.  (1897).  Letterbooks of Cheok Hong Cheong,.

·       Bayliss, Charles. & Merlin, Beaufoy. & American & Australasian Photographic Company (Sydney, N.S.W.).  (1872).  Chinese boarding house owned by William A. Sac, Gulgong, New South Wales, ca. 1872.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-147977283

·       Gill, Samuel Thomas. & James J. Blundell & Co. (Melbourne, Vic.).  (1855).  John Alloo's Chinese Restaurant, main road, Ballaarat.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-135291710

·       (1901).  Chinese dragon on parade in Melbourne, 1901.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-140811868

·       (1890).  Chinese funeral, Innisfail, Queensland, 1890-1910.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-137088403

·       Fairfax Corporation.  (1935).  Chinese puppets for the Chinese New Year, New South Wales, 8 February 1935.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-160384610

·       Tesla Studios.  ([18--?]).  Portrait of Quong Tart.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136718152

·       (1930).  Chinese Australian in his market garden, Northern Territory, ca. 1930.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-137943943

·       (1945).  Dragon Ball, Sydney, ca. 1945.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-147022814

·       ([194-?]).  Portrait of Mr. and Mrs. Chee Dock Nomchong.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136763383

·       (1877).  Portrait of Nell Nomchong, an early Braidwood settler, wearing her mother's wedding frock, 1877.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136763054

·       (1889, February 6). The Braidwood Dispatch and Mining Journal (NSW : 1888 - 1954), p. 3. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10960596

·       (1940).  The Nomchong store, Braidwood, New South Wales, ca. 1940.  https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-137358816

·       (1919).  Group portrait of the Nomchong family, ca. 1919.  http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-147019395

Hello, my name is Susannah Helman. I'm Rare  Books and Music Curator at the National Library  

of Australia. As we begin I acknowledge  Australia's first nations peoples as the  

traditional owners and custodians of this land,  I give my respect to the elders past and present  

and through them to all Australian Aboriginal  and Torres Strait Islander peoples.  

Today I'm talking about some of the Library's  earliest books. Everyone knows that libraries  

have books, the National Library of Australia  is no different. We hold millions of them. The  

Library has a rich rare books collection. It  is strongest in Australian books from the late  

18th century onwards as you would expect  from the National Library of Australia.  

Yet the Library also has a great collection of  early printed books, particularly those printed  

in Britain and Europe and it has collections  that can tell the early history of the book,  

particularly in the west, the transition between  manuscript books, books that were written by hand  

to printed books in which words are printed  with type and illustrations are also printed,  

usually through techniques such as  woodcuts and copperplate engravings.  

Now I'm going to show you some of  the stars of our early collections.  

We have a small but interesting  collection of medieval European  

manuscripts, both religious and secular,  that show, many of them in fragmentary form,  

the kinds of books produced in Europe in  the medieval and early modern period.  

Between the 10th and 16th centuries European  manuscripts and books evolved and changed. Works  

of science and religion coexisted. The rise of  universities in around 1200 led to an explosion of  

manuscript works and the growth of a secular book  industry beyond the walls of religious houses.  

Styles and standards of writing and illumination  varied by location, cost and use as well as by  

the skill of scribe and artist. The invention of movable type in  

Europe in the mid-15th century had a profound  effect on how books were produced and used.  

Many medieval manuscripts were broken up and  recycled in the bindings of printed books.  

This is the oldest manuscript  in the Library's collection,  

it comes from a Breviary, the service or prayer  book used by those in holy orders. Of English  

origin the writing is Caroline or Carolingian  miniscule, a rounded script that flourished  

during the reign of Charlemagne who lived  from around 742 to 814, Holy Roman Emperor.  

The script was widely used throughout Europe  for centuries and favoured for its legibility.  

Some of these letters however are formed in  ways more characteristic of earlier British  

or technically Insular manuscripts. You  can also see neumes, musical notation.  

The parchment's dark colour may have  been caused by chemical damage.  

Most medieval manuscripts were  written on prepared animal skin  

called vellum or parchment. These terms are  often used interchangeably today although to  

be strictly correct parchment refers to sheep  and goatskin and vellum to the finer calf skin.  

This leaf with its gash sewn up makes its animal  origins clear. As the holes made by thread  

are stretched the sewing was most likely done by  the parchment-maker while the skin was supple and  

still being prepared rather than during any later  repair. The thread is still in place. The text is  

from one of the great works of medieval theology,  the sentences by Peter Lombard, Bishop of Paris.  

This important cartulary, a compendium  of historical and business records,  

is one of five such volumes to survive from the  English Benedictine Abbey at Chertsey in Surrey.  

Dissolved by King Henry VIII in 1537 Chertsey  Abbey was one of over 800 religious houses  

whose lands and possessions were appropriated by  the King after he broke from Rome and established  

his own Church of England. This volume dates from  the Abbey's prime during the rule of Abbot John  

of Rutherwick, an expert administrator. It is  effectively the Abbey's record of its history  

including copies of documents and charters. In the hands of two or more scribes it records the  

Abbot's acts and the Abbey's property interests.  Some earlier accounts, the only extant examples,  

were used in the original binding making  this cartulary particularly significant.  

The Library has a substantial collection of early  English legal documents. This example shows they  

were not all boring to look at. It is written on  the flesh or smoother side of the parchment. It is  

a contract called an Indenture or chirograph.  Two copies would have been written out,  

one above the other. Before being cut  chirographum, or a variation thereof,  

meaning autograph was written  as a security measure.  

This is a book of hours dating from around  1450 and made in the southern Netherlands,  

probably for the English market. Books of hours  were prayer books for private devotion and were  

very popular in Europe from the 13th century. This  example was no doubt made for an English patron,  

possibly in Bruges or Ghent, then centres  of illuminated manuscript production.  

Annotations within the volume show that  it has been used by English speakers.  

It is often considered our most splendid book  of hours but it has obviously been well loved  

before that. It has inscriptions  and many of the borders are worn.  

This illumination called an historiated  initial as seen within a letter was cut  

from a large antiphonal a volume used by medieval  and Renaissance choirs. Cathedrals and monasteries  

usually had a set of 12 to 14 antiphonals  spanning the church year, each with a small  

number of illuminations. The musical notation  was so large it could be seen from a distance.  

This illumination shows the 4th century St Martin  of Tours who served as a Roman soldier in Amiens.  

Beside him is the beggar with whom Martin shared  his cloak and who he later dreamed was Jesus. The  

image appears within a letter O, the first letter  of the Magnificat, song of Mary, sung on the  

Feast of St Martin, the 11th of November which  begins "O beatum virum!", "Oh blessed man!"  

The Library's oldest printed item dates  from 1162. It was printed in China,  

a Chinese translation of a  Sanskrit Buddhist scripture.  

Books published before 1501 are called  incunabula. That word means swaddling  

clothes or cradle in Latin. That means that  they come from the earliest years of printing.  

They are often studied separately  from books that appeared afterwards.  

Johannes Gutenberg's Bible, the first major  work printed with moveable type, appeared  

in the mid-1450s. Its printing was a pivotal  moment in the history of the book. Also called  

the 42-line Bible it was the first major book  printed with movable metal type in Europe. The  

type used echoes that of contemporary manuscripts.  In its blue and red splitch running titles at the  

top of each page for the names of the book of the  Bible, it resembles those of 13th century Bibles.  

About 180 Gutenberg Bibles were printed on both  vellum and paper yet only around 48 survive,  

23 complete. While the main text is printed the  red and blue letters and highlighting were done  

by hand. Some copies of the Gutenberg Bible  were elaborately illuminated after printing.  

Our leaf is on the modest end of the scale.  

This renowned and significant  early work on witchcraft,  

Malleus Maleficarum, the Hammer of Witches,  was published widely until the 17th century.  

It has often been seen retrospectively as a  manual for the Inquisition in its quest to rid  

Europe of witchcraft. The margin notes in this  early Latin copy show it has been much used.  

The Nuremberg Chronicle is one of the earliest  and most ambitious printed books. It is known  

for its extraordinary woodcuts which reflect  new information gained by voyages of discovery  

and the coexistence of Christian and  Ptolemaic thinking at this time. A fusion  

of Biblical history and geography the book  outlines history from the creation to 1493.  

This very rare printed book of hours was  printed in Paris for an English entrepreneur.  

It shows how decades after Gutenberg's printed  Bible there was still a demand for books of hours  

and how early printed books emulated  earlier manuscript forms. Paris publishers,  

most of whom worked near Notre  Dame Cathedral on the le de la Cit  

used a combination of woodcut and metal  cut prints for the illustrations.  

This book tells of the life  and suffering of Christ.  

Its artist, Albrecht Durer, is commonly  regarded as the most important artist of  

the northern Renaissance. His specialty was  printmaking, particularly woodcuts and he  

was ambitious and innovative in his work. Few  copies of this popular book survive intact.  

To time travel a century or two I'm going to  end with two early works printed in Australia.  

The first is this, the earliest  surviving work printed in Australia.  

It was discovered in a collection in Canada  and given to the people of Australia by the  

Government of Canada. It advertises a long  evening's entertainment at Sydney's theatre.  

A play, Nicholas Rowe's Tragedy of Jane Shaw, a  farce and a dance. The performers were convicts  

and organised the performance themselves. The  second is the earliest illustrated book printed  

in Australia. This is John Lewin's extremely  rare Birds of New South Wales from 1813.  

To find out more about our collections you  can find more information on our website,  

online catalogue and keep an eye on our  social media channels, blogs and events.  

We have pages on our website about our medieval  manuscripts including digitised images of our  

holdings, thanks to the generous support of donors  to the 2014 Annual Appeal. Alternatively you can  

get a library card, search our catalogue and  call up an item to view in our Reading Room.  

We look forward to seeing you in person, online  or both. Thank you for watching.

Hello and welcome to this learning webinar  about the Indian Emigration Passes to Fiji  

as held in the National Library of Australia  s collection and freely available online.  

The National Library of Australia acknowledges  Australia s First Nations Peoples,   the first Australians, as the traditional  owners and custodians of this land  

and gives respect to the elders past and present   and through them to all Australian Aboriginal  and Torres Strait Islander peoples.  

We also acknowledge the National Archives of  Fiji as custodians of the original records  

and we thank them for making this collection  available to researchers around the world.  

Hello, my name is Judith, I m a reference  librarian here at the National Library Reader  

Services Team. Joining us is my colleague, Jack. Hello everyone, I m Jack and together with Judith  

we ll be taking you through  this presentation today.   Today we ll be looking specifically at how to find  the records for the Indian labourers who travelled  

to Fiji in the period 1879 to 1916. We ll start  with a brief overview of the indentured labour  

system, what it was and its legacy to Fiji. Next we ll take a look at the records themselves,  

what records exist, what they describe and  where to find them. Last, we ll look at all  

important access information, we ll talk you  through how to access these records for your   research purposes with some case studies. But let s start with the historical context  

for these records. When we started looking at  this topic the thing that struck me the most was  

that these records don t exist in a vacuum, these  records with real names and real faces to history  

and it is a history that can be a  little bit confronting at times.   For example, later in the session we ll look at  the record for Daulat who was a two-and-a-half  

year old son of indentured labourers and  Daulat is just one name out of 60,965 men,  

women and children who travelled from India  to Fiji under the indentured labourer system.  

So the labourers are often  known by the term girmityas   which comes from girmit. It s a borrowing  from the English word agreement which was used  

to designate the indentured labour system. Once we understand who these records talk  

about it links us to an understanding of what  they experienced, what their lives looked like  

and takes them from a name in the record to a  lived reality. For example a paper presented to   the Indian History Congress in 2001 gives  this description of living conditions.  

The coolies were accommodated in long sheds,  partitioned into 10 feet by 7 feet cubicles  

within which the system of indentured labour  was practised on the old slave states.  

Other accounts talk about the brutality of  the work, the homesickness for a country and   family left beyond and the difficulty of finding  a place in a deeply segregated colonial society.  

All of this is crucial information  for those researching family history,   colonial history and indentured labour. But we  ll start, what actually is indentured labour?  

So the short simplified answer is that a reliance  of indentured labour can be traced back to the  

abolition of slavery in the British Empire, back  in the 1830s so the loss of a plentiful supply of  

slaves led to a labour shortage on largescale  sugar, coffee, tea, cocoa, rice and rubber  

plantations. So to counteract this the powers that  be tapped into existing indentured labour systems  

and indebted labour systems to source workers. India as you can imagine was an extremely  

convenient source for cheap labour so workers  were recruited under both the indentured and   free labour system but under the indentured labour  system workers were contracted to travel to the  

plantations and work for a set number of years. In the case of emigration to Fiji the fixed term  

was five years, the answer to overseers  and estate managers and beyond the less  

than luxurious conditions that we ve already  mentioned workers could be criminally prosecuted  

if they left the estate. They then had to pay  their own way back to India after they d worked  

their five years so there was a possible free  passage after 10 years of industrious service.  

There was meant to be a quota of  women brought to the plantation   but numbers were usually far below target and we  now know that women were particularly oppressed  

under the system and faced incredible hardship.  But despite those conditions many girmitiyas  

stayed in Fiji where they  developed a unique culture,   society and they played a vital role in Fijian  history. The past was never forgotten however and  

you ll find many girmitiyas and families continue  to maintain or reconnect with their Indian roots.  

So why were these records  particularly important, Jack?   So these records are widely acknowledged to be so  

important because they re one of the only sources  that really document indentured labour in Fiji.  

In fact in 2011 the combined records  of Indian indentured labourers of Fiji,  

Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago were placed  on the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.  

The original documents themselves are  held in the National Archives of Fiji.   These were created and maintained by the British  administration during the colonial period.  

They document many elements surrounding the  indentured labour system. Later the records  

were microfilmed and given to a small number  of libraries and archives around the world   to enable people to consult their collection.  Family history researchers in particular made  

heavy uses of these passes to trace family back  to India and in many cases they were able to  

reconnect with the original villagers and even  family of their indentured ancestors. So in this  

way the records are a unique resource that is able  to connect people through time and distance.  

Are there other relevant records that the  Library or any other institution holds?  

There are. So the National Archives in the UK hold  many relevant records, not just indentured labour  

in Fiji but also other colonies. The Fiji Archives  also hold other material including the official  

government records. Birth, death and marriage  records are also held by the Fiji Registry of  

Births, Deaths and Marriages. Finally the National  Library of Australia also holds some relevant  

records from the British administration and these  are part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.  

The relevant material comes from the Colonial  Office series and mainly covers administrative  

matters including information about ships  and voyages. These are also available online.  

You might like to look at our AJCP  learning webinar and finding aids if   you are interested in these documents. We should also mention just keep in mind  

that when you are looking through these records  and searching for this content the language  

used is very much of the period so some of it  may be offensive from a modern perspective.  

Now I know the National Library has long supported  researchers using this collection by providing  

access in our reading rooms and through  our copying, lending and reference services  

however recognising the  importance of the collection   and particularly its heavy use amongst  the Fijian, Indian and other communities  

the Library has digitised a complete collection of  over 60,000 passes and other related collections  

so these are now freely and fully available  online from anywhere in the world.  

I do remember before they were digitised we had a  family of dedicated researchers who came to visit  

us from interstate and they were here for must  have been almost two weeks from open to close  

poring through the thousands of different frames  under microfilm, thousands of different passes.  

One evening there was a shout of jubilation in  the reading rooms when they d managed to discover   the passes they were looking for but having  this material online really does simplify  

access and makes it much easier for everybody  to track down their indentured ancestors.  

Yeah, absolutely. Hopefully a few more shouts in  living rooms when they discover more records.  

Before we show you how to access the digitised  records we will quickly run through the different   series and what information they hold. So there  are 17 separately listed items in our catalogue  

as you can see here but these can be grouped into  a smaller number of more important categories  

so these are the General Register of Indian  Immigrants, 1879 to 1916, Repatriation Registers,  

Death Registers, Plantations Registers and finally  the emigration passes themselves which are the  

most important due to their detail and because  the pass number serves as a unique identifier.  

Now you did have to explain to me what we  meant by unique identifier in this case, Jack.  

Well it works like the number on your  passport or your driver s licence number.   So like a registration number? Exactly, you ll see it popping up on  

other records and even things on marriage  and birth certificates. It s almost like   a shorthand way of identifying a person. The first type of record that we mentioned  

was the General Register. Could you  explain a little bit more about that?   Absolutely. So the General Register, it has  two main parts. There s the list of ships  

carrying indentured labourers and then there  will be the full list of indentured labourers  

within each ship. These are ordered by pass number  and you ll see that the names are arranged by   male, female, boy, girl and infants. Within these  the names are arranged by alphabetical order.  

Early records include the name, father s  name, age, sex, vessel, date of arrival, name,  

cost of passage, employer and  remarks. Later records contain   more information. This example from Book  9 includes columns for extension order,  

re-indentures, marriage, death, return to India  and others. So it s important to note that many  

of these columns are incomplete and may not be  comprehensive. For example repatriation or a death  

may not be included here but there s still a  wonderful amount of information in this register.  

Great. The next one we mentioned was repatriation  registers. Now these come under a variety of names  

such as the Alphabetical List of Fiji Born Indians  Repatriated to India, 20 December 1924 to 30,  

August 1930 or Nominal Roles of Indians  Repatriated to India, 1916 to 1947.  

For example here is one on pages from the Nominal  Roles. It s important to note that these records,  

it wasn t just those who were born  in India who were repatriated,   descendants of original indentured  labourers are also listed  

and could have been given passage. So free passage  was available once certain conditions had been met  

including number of years worked and time spent  in Fiji. Travellers mostly returned on the same  

ships that were bringing labourers out to Fiji so  the information recorded typically includes name,  

father s name, pass number, ship of return  or ship of arrival and sometimes caste.  

There are also several volumes of  death registers of indentured Indian   emigrants working on plantations. These are  generally organised chronologically but there  

are some that are arranged by plantation  instead. Details are generally fewer than  

those found in other series but typically  you can find pass number, the ship name,   the date of indenture, plantation, employer,  date of death and the cause of death as well.  

Finally we have the plantation registers.  Now these are another digitised collection   that can provide essential detail  about an indentured ancestor.  

Not all the registers have survived unfortunately  and some are very incomplete but each plantation  

should have an entry with a list of indentured  labourers working on the property. Details   supplied are normally the pass number, name, ship  of arrival, sex, age, date of indenture, term,  

pass number, relations and sometimes details  related to repatriation or death. These can be  

really useful to trace who your ancestors were  working with and other personal connections.  

So it sounds like all of these different records  do have slightly different information on them  

and it looks like there s some overlap  but unique things in every one.  

So they would be fairly interconnected and  that would give us some options on how to  

cross-reference them, wouldn t it? Yeah, exactly.   Alright in that case let s move on to  the emigration passes themselves.  

These are generally the most sought after  documents for those researching your family   history. As we mentioned earlier the pass number  is an important detail that was used in other  

areas. The passes contain the most genealogical  information from all the records and were also  

more systematically recorded. If possible this  is the record you should try to locate. There  

are separate passes for men, women, boys, girls,  infant boys and infant girls. These are split into  

different sections for each ship, the men are  recorded first then the women then the children  

then the infants. As with the general register  it is by alphabetical order within these groups.  

Judith, do we have any more  information about how these passes   were filled out? Did it happen in India? In Fiji? Well actually a little bit of both so these passes  

were filled out before embarkation at one of the  immigration depots in India. The depot s surgeon  

was responsible for correctly filling out the  details. The passes were then given to the Master  

of Transport to compare with the ship s lists and  this is where they were given a ship s number.  

Once the vessel had arrived in Fiji the  passes were returned to the labourers and   assigned a pass number from the General  Register that we mentioned before.  

That sounds like a lot of recordkeeping  but are there mistakes in the passes?   Yes so one crucial point here is that the Depot  Surgeon was responsible for transcribing personal  

and place names so spelling mistakes and errors  are common, particularly when you have a language  

or cultural disconnect. There is a lack of  consistency even within passes on the same ship.  

So the information recorded remained  almost identical over the years. This is  

an example from the first arrival of indentured  labourers that were on board Leonidas in 1879.  

The pass number is right at the top, number one  in this case. Listed below are many other fields,  

for example we have a ship s name, the  ship s number, the location of the depot,   the date, the depot number, the caste,  father s name, age, the zilla which is  

a kind of county subdivision, Pergunnah5 which  was a smaller division of a zilla, the village,  

occupation, name of next of kin, if married,  to whom, marks and a range of signatures.  

Here is an example of a pass of the Sutlej in  1916 so this was the last group of indentured  

labourers to emigrate. Note the fingerprints that  appear on the right-hand side of passes from the  

later voyages. Some of the terminology has also  changed slightly but the recorded information  

is very similar. So Jack, it seems like  the pass number is the most important  

in terms of following the records but are  any of the other numbers useful on here?  

Absolutely. So some of the other numbers  can also be used for tracing family members.  

Let s just have a look at the depot  numbers in a little bit more detail.   We ll start let s have a look at this pass, 1332.  See the section where it has the name of next of  

kin? It says mother of 786. As these were filled  out in the depot it is important to know that the  

786 in this case refers to depot number 786 and  not pass number 786. Now the depot numbers can  

be difficult to find as they re not in order but  in most cases they will be in the same voyage.  

We've done some digging beforehand and we ve found  some with a depot number 786 and this is with the  

pass number 13542. Checking this pass we can see  that the relation is confirmed with the text,  

son of 785. We can imagine the mother waiting  with her son as the forms are filled out one  

after the other and this explains the close  depot numbers. Sometimes you ll find a whole   section of your family undertaking the same  trip with these consecutive depot numbers.  

So as you can see there are many types of  records but the most important for tracing family  

are the emigration passes so these are a  rich source of genealogical information and  

can provide you a direct link back  to a location or family in India.   Now we ve given you the background and overview  of the records, we want to show you how to access  

them and use them for your research. Using a  case study of a family we will show you what  

indexes are available through different websites  and how to use these to search the passes. Next,  

how our research guide lets you browse the passes  including demonstrating how to download images and  

find permanent links. Then we ll show you how to  access some of the other resources we mentioned  

earlier before touching on using civil  registration records to locate pass numbers.  

So as we mentioned, particularly if you are new  to this research, one of the best places to start  

when researching passes is on our research  guide. As well as background information  

about the records, the arrangements and how  we can help you, you will see some important  

links so on the right-hand side you can see the  link to girmit.org website and to the National  

Archives of Fiji. So the Girmit website provides a  searchable index of indentured labourers that was  

put together using data from the National Archives  of Fiji who also provide the same data as a pdf.  

So if I click the link to open up the Girmit page  you will see that it is a work in progress and has  

not yet been finished so it means that the  records indexed only run from A to M however  

this is still an extremely important  resource and if your ancestor s names   fall into this range it should be your first  step. Let s have a look at a common name, Daulat.  

So I ve gone into the D section and you can  see up the top here there is a search bar.  

Now I can start typing to see a full list of  results or if you have doubts about the spelling  

used as Judith mentioned earlier I can also  scroll down until I find the relevant section.  

In this case I will use a search and we ll see  that there are quite a few results for the same  

name. So this means that if your ancestor s  name has quite a few results you may need to  

search through several different passes to verify  that it is the pass that you are looking for.  

Let's have a look at Daulat, son of  Ramcharan who came out on board The  

Sangola so the pass number here is 37082. Okay, let s come back to our research guide  

now that we know the pass number. On the left-hand  side of the screen you can see some subheadings  

and as we now know the pass number  we can go straight to Access by Pass   so if you click on that and then scroll  down until you find the right range.  

So we re looking for 36318 to 37171. Right so  click the View Online Link to go into the viewer.  

So you can see the pass number  noted at the top of that form.  

Using the side bar at the top scroll across so  we can get closer to the page number that we  

re looking for or rather the pass number  that we re looking for which is 37082.  

Just keep going a little bit further   and once we get close we can just use the  arrows to go page by page to the right pass.  

So we will get there, 37082 and here we  go. Here's the genealogical information  

that we can now use to trace the  family back to India as well.  

I m just going to pause us there for a second  cause we did want to talk about how to download an  

image of this one. So now that we have the pass,  on the left-hand side of the screen you ll see  

that there is a download icon. If we click this  you ll see there are several different options  

and we have different formats, a jpeg and a  pdf. Just note that if you do choose the jpeg  

it will be a compressed file and you will need  to unzip this before you can view the image.  

Now the other important thing is  that if you click all images here  

this will include the passes for everybody  that came out on board that ship. If you  

re only interested in a single pass, Daulat s  pass in this instance, click current and this  

means that when you download you will only  download this single image for this pass.  

But hang on, what if we only want to link back to  this record rather than download the whole thing?  

Absolutely so you also have the option to  use it like if I click on a sight icon now  

you ll see that we have the work and image options  again. The work once again will be for the whole  

shipload and will include all the passes and it  will take you to the beginning of that sequence.  

If we choose image you ll see that this  image identifier will take us directly  

to this pass every time and this is a stable  permanent link that you can use in your records  

that you ll always come back to this record. That's fantastic. So looking at the pass  

it s mentioned here that his father is listed as  next of kin and that Daulat is only two-and-a-half  

years old so could we assume in that case  that he came out with a family member?  

I think it s a pretty good assumption and  it s possibly the father as this is who   has been listed by the Depot Surgeon. Let  s return to the research guide and have a  

look at how we would search. We ve assumed  that the ship and the date are the same  

and so we can click through the records  until we find possible matches.  

But if we wanted to go through more quickly  we could always use the General Register   that we talked about earlier so you ll find  a link to the General Register in the Other  

Further Resources tab. If you follow the link  through to the Viewer once we find the resource,  

just over there, click through into the Viewer  

and when browsing the collection you're  looking for the appropriate date range   so we re looking for The Sangola that departed in  February 1908 so the date range for that would be  

Collection Book 7. Once that loads just up the top  here you can see it s listed as arriving in March.  

So we now need to look through to see  where the relevant section starts.  

Again you can use that top  taskbar to scroll through  

and we re looking for The Sangola, February 1908.  

We should have him here  

and here we are. We ve found a pass number 36580.  

Wonderful so that was a great tip,  Judith, cause this way we didn t need to   click through every individual pass,  we could just go through the register.  

Let s go back to our research guide and we ll  select Access by Pass Number again to find this  

pass, just here. Once again it s pass number  36580 so we ll go back to the research guide,  

Access by Pass Number so same voyage that  we were looking at before, here we are.  

So we need to click through until we  find 36580. Alright, almost there.  

Here we are, we ve found it. Okay so let  s compare the details with Daulat s pass.  

It looks like we have a match, we ve  got the same caste, the same district,   the same thana and the same village. Yeah, what s really interesting here as  

well is that there s a wife listed with the depot  number as well so this is another great piece of  

information that can lead you to another search.  We won t go through the whole process again,  

as you can see it takes a little bit of  clicking through but we do recommend that  

it would be easier to go back to the General  Register at this point to find the pass number.  

We have done the research beforehand and  we found that it s pass number 37048.  

Alternatively if you think the spelling might  be inaccurate you could also browse through  

the passes looking for a depot number. These are  unfortunately not listed in the General Register.  

Let s just note the ships did make  many voyages and so you may need  

to look through quite a number of ships if  all you have is the ship name and no date.  

Let s go back to our research guide and have  a look at the Access by Ship for a little bit  

more information so we ve got Access by Ships  Name. Imagine that we were looking for someone  

and we only know that they came aboard The  Ganges. If we look at the relevant section  

here you ll see that it made seven trips so this  could involve quite a lengthy search if you had  

no other information. It is possible but if  there are other documents what might help  

this is where you try and take a shortcut. We talked about the number appearing on   some other documents earlier, could  these be helpful locating the passes?  

Oh absolutely so an approach that can provide  breakthrough information in some cases uses  

the Fijian civil registration records so  these are marriages or birth certificates.  

So if a girmitya was married according  to the ordinances of the Colony of Fiji  

a number of details had to be included with the  registered number such as the pass number, the  

name of ship, plantation where they were assigned  and sometimes the pass number you will also find  

on the birth certificates if a child s born to  girmityas. So as you mentioned before the pass   numbers was a shorthand way of identifying the  parents. Please note that to get a copy of these  

certificates you will need to contact the Registry  of Births, Deaths and Marriages back in Fiji.  

We have a link to the Registry on the  research guide itself just up here.  

This brings us to the end of the presentation  today about using the Indian Emigration Passes   to Fiji. We ve covered the background  to the indentured labour system.  

How the records are arranged  and what information they have.   Then we showed you how you can  access these resources online.  

The case study we presented should have provided a   good indication of the nuts and  bolts of using this collection  

and how you can trace your family through them. Of course if you get stuck and need some tips   or advice don t hesitate to reach out to  us through our Ask a Librarian service.  

We hope you ve enjoyed the presentation and have  come away with some new information.  

Hello, my name Leisa and I'm Ella and  we’re reference librarians here at the National Library  

of Australia. Have you ever wanted to start your  family history, but you just don’t where to begin?  

It may surprise you to learn that you can start  your family tree right from your loungeroom or  

wherever you like. Let us show you step-by-step  and if you get stuck, we’re always here to help.

A good place to start your research is  identify what you know about your ancestors.  

Here are some questions to get you started: What was your great grandfather’s full name?  

Did he immigrate from non-English  speaking country such as China,  

Germany or Norway? Did he  anglicise his first or last name? 

Do you know your grandparent’s  birth, death and marriage dates? 

Do you know which language, social or  nation group a previous generation of  

your descendants belonged to? Did they live  on a mission, reserve or pastoral station? 

Did you know the name of the  town your parents grew up in? 

Did your grandparents serve in any wars? What religion did your grandmother belong to?

Once you have identified what you know  then you can start to capture details  

using a pedigree or ancestral chart.  We have charts freely available to  

download or print from our ‘Getting Started’  section in our Family History research guide.  

Alternatively, you may like to contact your local  historical society. There are some excellent  

First Nations family tree chart templates  that can be downloaded from the Australian  

Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait  Islander Studies (known as AIATSIS) website. 

A systematic approach, working backwards  from yourself is the easiest way to trace  

your ancestry. It is best to work from the known  to the unknown, one generation back at a time.  

Start by writing down your full name, date and  place of birth, followed by your parent’s full  

names, dates and places of birth, then your  grandparent’s dates and places of birth on your  

mother’s side then father’s side and so forth. If you are not sure about an ancestor’s details,  

then simply leave the form blank. Avoid  guessing and supplying incorrect information.  

Remember to keep any information,  about a living person, private.

Look over your family history tree chart  to work out what gaps need to be filled.  

Choose an ancestor to discover more about. Plan  what records to access and where to locate them.  

Records created at the time your ancestor  was alive will be the most reliable.  

You may discover your great grandfather’s  first job hidden in an electoral roll,  

or your great-grandmother’s passenger arrival  to Australia, your ancestor’s baptism record, or  

even uncover that missing piece of the puzzle in a  newspaper article that solves that family mystery. 

Family members can often provide stories,  memories, photos or memorabilia about a deceased  

family member. You may find someone else in the  family has already started the family history  

or holds documents useful to your research. Birth, death and marriage certificates  

can often provide more information about an  ancestor and could include things like birth,  

death and marriage dates, place of  registration, family members, age,  

occupation and much more. Certificates can be  purchased from relevant state or territory Birth,  

Death or Marriage Registry Offices. We have  more information about this on our website.

Libraries and Archives can hold an array of  documents and records in a variety of formats  

including online, print and  microform. Search National,  

State and local Libraries and Archives websites  to discover family history resources they hold. 

Family History databases can contain a range  of digitised records and indexes searchable by  

your ancestor’s name. Contact your local library  to find out if they subscribe to any databases.

When you have hit that research brick  wall, there are places that can help. 

Family history societies have expert knowledge in  

different aspects of family history  and offer ongoing research support.  

Many societies provide workshops and hold local  collections or indexes relevant to their area.  

Search online or contact your local  shire council to find a society near you. 

The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres  Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) Family History  

Unit provides family history research assistance  for First Nations people particularly families  

affected by the stolen generation. Visit the  AIATSIS family history page for more information. 

For extensive or ongoing family history  research, you might like to hire a private  

professional researcher. You can find  a list of researchers on our website.

You  can find our Family History research guide  

under the ‘Using the Library’ then ‘Research tools  and resources’ located at the top of our homepage.  

Our 'Ask a Librarian' reference service provides research assistance at any stage of your family history research.

So, if you have a family history question, you can  get in touch with us by filling out the

Ask a Librarian online form. You can also chat to us over the  phone, mail us a letter or simple visit us  

and talk to one our friendly librarians in the  reading room. Good luck and happy researching!

R: Hi, my name is Rowan Henderson and I'm a Senior Adviser in the Curatorial at Collection

Research section of the National Library of Australia. I'm joined by Philip Jackson, Program

Manager in Curatorial and Collection Research. Welcome to this discovery video in which Philip

and I will explore the PROMPT collection at the Library. Philip has worked for the Library's

Australian Printed Collections for the last 10 years and he will be sharing some of the

PROMPT collection highlights in this video. The rich culture of Australia's First Nations

people has included performance for tens of thousands of years. The National Library of

Australia acknowledges these First Australians as the traditional owners and custodians of

this land. We give respect to the elders past and present and through them to all Australian

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. So what is the PROMPT collection? The PROMPT

collection is a collection of collections that relate to the performing arts in Australia

from the 1880s until the present. It's a part of the Library's ephemera collection, held

in a special stack area. And what's ephemera? Ephemera is printed material that is usually

created for a particular purpose and not intended to be kept. In the Library we use the guide

that it s usually less than five pages long. It s mostly printed on paper but can also

include objects like hats, shirts and badges. It's often printed on flimsy material and

can be difficult to conserve. As the PROMPT collection relates to the performing

arts it mainly contains programs but may also include subscription, brochures, flyers, invitations

and tickets. Because of their size posters are stored separately, and magazines in the

Library's serials collection. The PROMPT collection is vast, it currently

contains 5,269 collections and uses over 300m of shelving. It documents a huge range of

topics such as prominent individuals in the performing arts, organisations and groups,

venues and performances and it covers genres such as pop, rock and folk music, opera, circus,

actors of stage and film, comedians, orchestras, theatre companies and performing art schools.

The people and places covered might be known in Australia and around the world or they

could be completely local and unknown elsewhere. The performers might not even be Australian

but if they performed in Australia they could be in the collection.

Why does the Library collect performing arts ephemera? The Library collects this material

so that the Australian community can now and in the future discover, learn and create new

knowledge. The Library's role is to develop and maintain a library collection including

a comprehensive collection relating to Australia and the Australian people. The Library collects

ephemera to document life in Australia, what has happened, where it was and who was involved.

In this case the collection documents the performing arts, to show what has been performed

and created in Australia at any point in time, by whom and where.

How does the Library collect it? The Library actively looks for ephemera to collect but

also relies on the public and collectors to let us know what is available. We also work

with other libraries so that they collect material relevant to their state or territory

while we collect items of national interest. If you re a collector and would like to offer

items to the Library for this collection you can do so through our website.

So how can you find out what is in the PROMPT collection? The Library has created a handy

new finding aid which lists all the collections under headings such as individuals, performances

and events, subjects and venues. You can explore it by searching our catalogue for the Guide

to the Australian Performing Arts Programs and Ephemera PROMPT Collections in the National

Library of Australia. If you're interested in donating ephemera

to our collection it would be appreciated if you could check our lists first to make

sure we don t already hold the same material. It s also important to remember that there

is other material in the Library s collection relating to the performing arts that is not

in the PROMPT collection. This material could be found in the manuscripts, pictures and

oral histories collections as well as in the Library s extensive collection of books. You

can search our catalogue to discover these other collections.

Now Philip is going to take us through some of the highlights of the PROMPT collection.

P: PROMPT is a theatrical term relating to an offstage reminder for an actor or singer

of the lines that they have forgotten and although it isn t exactly an acronym it may

have been something of an in joke to adopt this term for the National Library s collections

of programs and other performing arts memorabilia. Our collection is arranged into mini collections

by subject or topic which may be the name of a performer or performing arts company.

The collections range all the way through the alphabet. We have things from A to Z,

from Abba to Charles Zwar who was an Australian songwriter, composer, lyricist, pianist, music

director who mainly worked in England from the 1930s to the 1960s. He did the music for

All Square which is included in this program here and his name is in one of the chequerboards

on the front of the program. There may be earlier items but mainly the

collection consists of material from the 1880s onwards. In the performing arts exhibition

that we've got on at the moment there s a thing by Bland Holt who s one of our most

important early performers and impresarios. That exhibition shines a spotlight on the

National Library s performing arts collections. There are PROMPT files for Australians who

have achieved great fame overseas such as Dame Nellie Melba. In the show there's the

1902 ticket from Melbourne which is her home town where she got her name from and this

is a program from the first world war, a charity concert for Polish refugees.

As well as having achieved great fame overseas in London Peach Melba was named after her

by the great chef, Escoffier. In America there was even a packet of cigars named after her.

So this is a Flor de Melba cigar box, a thing which is probably not a very appropriate thing

for a singer. Other performers who feature prominently and on stage are Robert Helpmann

and he actually danced in this memorial matinee for Anna Pavlova. He did a duet with a Russian

ballerina from Swan Lake and at the other end of his career there s the program for

his state funeral where you can find a eulogy delivered by Don Dunstan, the former State

Premier of South Australia and a strong supporter of the arts.

Barry Humphries was another Australian who achieved great fame overseas. These are some

items from the PROMPT collection relating to an exhibition of her frocks. Cate Blanchett,

for her we cover her stage performances rather than her work as a film actor. So Kylie Minogue,

we concentrate on her live performances rather than her recorded sound which is really looked

after by the National Film and Sound Archive. So this is a program for Cate Blanchett from

a performance in New York with David Wenham and this is from Kylie Minogue's 1991 tour.

Opera PROMPT files include Dame Joan Sutherland and Richard Bonynge. Dame Joan also had some

food named after her. This is a menu from a restaurant in Wellington and there's a spinach

fettuccine named after her as well as the dessert at the end of the menu which is called

La Stupenda which was her nickname. As well as programs we have all sorts of material

so there were also some stamps issued to honour Dame Joan a few years ago as well.

There are other opera companies in the collection as well as Opera Australia, the big company

so there s the Pinchgut Opera which is a smaller opera company that concentrates mainly on

baroque music so this is a program of work from 1778 which they performed for a rare

time in Sydney in 2015. Ballet programs, we have things from Ballet

Russe who were one of the first big ballet companies to tour Australia in 1936. The Borovansky

Ballet Borovansky came from overseas but stayed in Australia for a long time and did much

to establish Australian ballet. Australian Ballet, we've got programs here on display

from the early 1960s and then 2000. This is a program honouring Graeme Murphy. There are

things from Bangarra as well, the Aboriginal dance company. In the exhibition there s a

full size copy of the poster for this program, Praying Mantis Dreaming with a wonderful part

by Libby Blayney and then there s a much more recent program there for Skin which is a program

by Bangarra that examines family kinship. Australian theatre has a huge range of material

in the PROMPT collection. We've only got one program here on display which is the Bell

Shakespeare Company s first production of Hamlet in 1991. The Tivoli Theatre was a big

circuit. It was linked to JC Williamson who was known as The Firm. They were a huge company

that was set up in 1882 and they ran theatre pretty much in Australia until 1976.

These two programs here are from 1939 and they brought in people like Anna May Wong

who was an actress from Hollywood and the Mills brothers who were African American singers.

The Tivoli also in the 1940s and 50s were a lot more risque than you might expect from

that conservative period. There are programs with chorus girls and can-can dancers and

that sort of thing. We've got musicals such as Jesus Christ Superstar.

There's a program from 1972 with a ticket. Instead of Phantom of the Opera well we do

have that as well, we've got Phantoad of The Opera which was a Brisbane parody of it from

1991. Wicked, a modern play and of course Tim Minchin's Matilda on display in the

On Stage exhibition. There's material related to traditional circuses

such as Ashton's who were established in 1932 and this particular program has a little caption

on it "Col and I went in 1967 and it was a very good show " so programs can be mementos

of a performance with a personal touch. More recently a more modern circus is Circus

Oz. This is a program from their seasons in the early 1990s. Circus Oz don't include any

animals in their circus but there are animals in the performing arts collections such as

Topsy who was a performing horse who could count, identify colours, play cards, do magic

tricks. Topsy toured eastern Australia performing mainly in the Gold Coast region in the early

1950s. This little item indicates that she gave command performances for horse lovers

like Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip in 1952, '54 and the Queen Mother in 1958.

There are also performing arts events for festivals, Adelaide Festival. That's from

the first one in 1960 and then there's the Garden of Earthly Delights from the Adelaide

Fringe Festival from only a few years ago and the National Folk Festival. There's a

poster from that in the On Stage exhibition and in the PROMPT collection there s a media

kit for the 50th anniversary of the festival in 2016 so the festival started in 1967.

The PROMPT collection contains a huge range of highly significant, evocative, beautiful

and fascinating material and whatever your personal interests may be there is probably

something in it that will amuse or entertain you.

Hello, my name is Gareth.

I'm a digital preservation coordinator

here at the National Library of Australia.

The National Library of Australia

acknowledges Australia's first nations peoples,

the first Australians, as the traditional owners

and custodians of this land

and gives respect to the elders, past and present.

And through them, to all Australian Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander people.

One of the most challenging aspects

of digital preservation is not the actual work

but surprisingly, it's explaining what it is to people.

Think of it as the digital equivalent

of physical conservation.

So the library has books, manuscripts, artworks,

and many other objects.

And they might require treatment from time to time,

if covers or spines are damaged

or there's rips and tears in paper.

The library has a dedicated team

to treat these physical items, to keep them stable

and accessible to users.

Likewise, the library has a growing collection

of born-digital publications, images, and personal archives.

And you might not think it, but digital objects

in my opinion, are even more fragile

and require a lot more attention

and treatment to help keep them stable and accessible.

My background is in linguistics and Mandarin Chinese,

so it even comes as a surprise to me

that I've ended up here in digital preservation.

More so because I didn't even know the difference

between a JPEG, or a PNG file, or an MP3 and MP4,

so how did I possibly end up here?

Well, I was given an opportunity to define a few terms

for a project that has become quite a significant area

of work, both here at the library

and in the field of digital preservation itself.

This one little opportunity has opened my mind

to the importance of digital preservation.

What we do is a balance of practical work, future planning,

and applied research to look after and ensure access

to the libraries growing digital collections.

But before we can do any of that, the most important thing

is to get content off "carriers"

as they come into the library, and into "manage storage"

so that we do not lose the content.

And what I mean by physical carriers

is CDs, DVDs, hard drives, etc.

Fortunately, this is a shared responsibility

across the library and that frees up our time to focus

on other important digital preservation work.

There are some pretty straightforward questions

that guide digital preservation.

And in fact, these are questions

that you can ask at home as well.

Which file formats exist in these digital collections?

Can the library provide access to the content

of these file formats

to users with the software that it has?

Do we need additional software, or professional software?

Will the library be able to continue to provide access

to the content of these formats in the future?

And if not, what do we need to do about it now?

The practical and applied research

that we do go hand in hand.

Our digital preservation system, "Preservica",

produces reports on the 2 million files it currently holds.

We analyze these reports weekly

to determine whether the library holds new file formats,

whether there are any corrupted files,

or any other issues that we need to be aware of.

That involves a lot of research

into understanding the file formats that we have,

known issues that these file formats might have,

and the software that supports them.

So if I may paint a picture of what this looks like,

cast your mind back to The Matrix movie.

Can you see that green screen full of binary code

and other symbols raining down?

Well, my monitors look a bit like that too,

they're just not green.

And to stress how cool the work is,

we are time travelers.

We are always jumping between earlier operating systems

to run old applications from the years past.

So just the other week, I was in PC-Write from 1983

in an old DOS 3 environment.

The library holds approximately three petabytes

of digital content.

And that's around 15 billion files.

I should say that this number

doesn't include all the backups either.

Three petabytes of digital content

would be around the same as 3000 one-terabyte hard drives.

Or if we were to convert that to the average storage size

of a phone today, which is around 256 gigabytes,

we would have just under 12,000 phones of data.

It's amusing to remember, at least to me, that 10 years ago

we weren't talking in terabytes, but now we all are.

It's only a matter of time

before we're talking about petabytes at home as well.

Some people might not realize

that digital content that we create requires

active management to ensure their longevity.

And a big part of this is looking after storage.

So what are some of the typical challenges?

The volume of the digital content we create is huge.

We are taking more photos and videos,

creating more documents, than ever before.

And the file sizes are getting bigger.

Yes, storage might be relatively cheap,

but what are you going to do about the quality

of your own own collections?

Are you deleting what you don't want to keep?

And are we really backing up our content?

The impression I get when talking to friends and family

is that they're not backing up their content,

so precious photos and videos are stored solely

on a mobile phone, or on the computer, and nothing else.

Now I might talk a bit about the rise

of the convenient cloud storage.

Yes, this is great.

Be warned, those providers are not responsible

if your content is lost or become corrupted.

So you need to do your own backups as well.

And whilst we're talking about backups, hard drives,

they fail just like any other physical carrier.

So the best practice is to replace your backup hard drives

with new ones once every five years,

or if you notice any performance issues sooner.

The library has a large number

of all of the common carriers

you have around your homes today in its collections.

So I'm talking about CDs, DVDs, USB sticks,

hard drives, among others.

The library also has a large number of legacy carriers too.

And I daresay many viewers will have these

around their homes as well.

They include three and a half inch

and five and a quarter inch floppy discs.

The library also has some other rare carriers as well

including jazz discs, zip discs, and SyQuest cartridges.

As I've stressed before,

we ideally only access these carriers once

to transfer the content to manage storage.

Some carriers can be processed by us and colleagues

on everyday computers.

The three and a half inch floppy discs can be processed

on everyday computers with the help of a USB floppy drive.

Other carriers, however,

such as the five and a quarter inch floppys,

require legacy computer setups

or professional equipment,

depending on the flavor of the floppy discs.

This is the perfect opportunity

to tell everyone one simple message:

get your content off those physical carriers

that might be hiding around your house, garage,

and put it all into one managed storage.

And that's typically your computer.

If you don't, those carriers will eventually fail

and whatever content is upon it will be lost as well.

So let's make it fun,

let's create a digital preservation project at home.

Round up all of the carriers you have and assess

what kind of content they contain

or might contain, if possible.

And determine which carriers you want to process.

Now, it's time to transfer the content.

Some carrier types will be easy to process yourself,

whilst others might require assistance.

Fortunately, some of the carriers

at a greater risk of failure, are the ones

that are the easiest to process.

So let's do them first.

And they are the CDs, DVDs, USB sticks,

and all of the other small hard drives

that you have around the place.

Now what about the three and a half-inch floppy discs

and zip drives?

If you don't have a computer

with a three and a half-inch floppy drive

or a zip drive to assist you,

there are plenty of USB three and a half-inch floppy drives

and zip drives available online that you can purchase.

You can plug these into any Windows computer

via a USB port.

Or a Mac computer,

depending on the disc format.

Gets a bit trickier with older carriers

such as the five and a quarter-inch floppy discs.

And I'd say that most people wouldn't have access

to a working five and a quarter-inch drive.

There are professionals who can transfer the content

from these carriers for a fee, so it's worth considering.

Now that you have all the content that you wish to keep

off those carriers and onto your managed storage,

it's time to do an analysis of your own collection.

Go back to the guiding questions I talked about

at the beginning, and do your best to answer them.

It's best to think of your phone and any memory card

as being physical carriers, because they are.

These are carriers that can and will fail, without warning.

So it is best to back up or transfer the content

to your managed storage.

Remember, that's your computer.

I've heard of so many people losing all

of their precious photos and videos

because they've lost their phone,

or their phone has suddenly stopped working, or is damaged.

These are photos and videos

that they will never be able to get back.

So please, teach yourself how to back up your phone,

ask the people around you how to do it if you're unsure.

Most of the time, all you need is a USB cable

and a computer.

There are also cloud storage services

like iCloud, OneDrive, Google drive,

that automatically back up the photos

and videos you take to cloud storage.

However, you will need to do a bit of research to make sure

that this is set up in the right way for you

and you need to be aware

of the risks involved in using such services.

And lastly, my

top tips for looking after your digital content.

if you want your digital content to last,

you will need to actively manage it.

You can't just stick it in a hard drive,

put it in the cupboard, and expect it to last.

Keep your computer organized.

So I'm talking about consistent folder and file names;

perhaps ordered by year and project.

Don't forget to delete what you do not want to keep.

We also need a good backup system.

I would recommend that you buy two external hard drives

for backing up your main computer.

One could be connected to the computer

for automatic backups, whilst the other

could periodically back up your computer

and be stored at your work or some other location.

You might also want to consider

that convenient cloud storage option as well,

in addition to your backups.

You should refresh your backup hard drives every five years.

So just remember, like CDs and other physical carriers,

your hard drive does fail.

So it is good to buy new ones every five years.

Think about the file formats you have

in your collection and the software needed to access them.

If you have older file formats,

and with little software support,

you might want to consider moving the content

to a different file format.

Hello. My name is Judith and I’m a Reference Librarian here at the National Library of Australia.

The National Library of Australia acknowledges Australia’s first nations peoples, the first Australians as the traditional owners and custodians of this land. We give our respect to the elders past and present and through them to all Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Thank you for joining me on this discovery of the ways in which the National Library could be useful to you, our industry colleagues, and to your patrons. For the National Library being useful is described by the National Library Act 1960, in practical terms our mission, is to collect today what will be important tomorrow, to collaborate with others, to deepen the impact of cultural collections, to connect communities and national collections and to build strong foundations to give back to the nation.

These mission statements influence all the topics I’ll touch on today. I’ll go over our reference and other services, highlight a few of our newest research services and briefly touch on ways we continue to develop our collections to make them inclusive and accessible.

This will sound incredibly obvious but one of the best ways to get a sense of what the National Library does is through our website. You can use our online catalogue to investigate our collection and use our information pages to investigate our services. For example you can find information on our legal deposit processes here or contact information for the ISBN agency here, all useful if you or your patrons are working on a new publication. Our website is also where you can find information on the broad range of formats and collections that we hold.

The focus here is to highlight significant or unique material that you could access through us so it is definitely worth checking to see if we hold a copy of that hard to find book or have ephemera material for that tricky research topic. Once you know that we hold something you are interested in there are several ways we may be able to help with access. Our Copies Direct service can provide part or full copies as per the Australian Copyright Act 1968. We do provide some types of collection items on interlibrary loan where possible or we simply provide a safe and accessible space in our reading rooms here in the Library building for collection items to be used.

The National Library holds upwards of 10 million collection items so we’re unable to have all of our collection out for browsing purposes. As you can imagine shelf checking a collection that size would be impossible so we act as a closed stacks library meaning that requests must be made through our online catalogue using a National Library reader’s card. We then deliver material to our reading rooms for your use. This makes our catalogue a great starting point for getting to grips with our collection.

The default search option in our catalogue is a simple search which I’m sure will be fairly self-explanatory. I would like to highlight two other search functions for our catalogue. A method I like to use for browsing on a broad scale would be browsing the subject headings. To do this, choose the browse alphabetically option at the top. The default search parameter here is titles but you would simply adjust that to subjects. As you can see, not only can you browse the subject headings beginning with the key word folklore but you also now have other related subject terms as well as notes directing you to look for folklore as a subdivision in other related subjects.

The second search method I recommend is the advanced search. You can absolutely do a precise title, author, subject heading or ISBN search in simple search or you could use a broader keyword search and the refine your results using the narrow search options on the right-hand side of the search results screen. However we do also have an advanced search option. The advanced search is great if you need to perform a very targeted search. As you can see there are far more limiters available with an advanced search and I generally find the advanced search option is great for harder to find titles such as individually catalogued government reports.

In fact we recently came across a great example in the dataset, Australian Periodical Publications, 1840 to 1845. This dataset was removed leaving the links incorrect for readers to access the individually catalogued digitised titles. Now you could run a simple search for that dataset title using Boolean logic. I tried it, it did work but I got 563 results for Australian periodical publications in quotes and the results included material that were not part of the series. In contrast I ran the search in our advanced search field and found the exact 63 titles within that series.

Of course once you have found an item of interest in our catalogue it is worth knowing how to read the catalogue record. Useful things to watch for in the catalogue records are the access conditions, format, summaries, subject headings and related resources like binding aids. One useful tip for your patrons will be checking the records of series to make sure we hold the issue or date range that they are interested in. This record from our oral history collection shows you where to look to see access conditions. As you can see, access to part of the collection are restricted. In this situation you could submit an Ask a Library enquiry to ask for further information on seeking permission to access the item.

This is a great example of another type of access note to watch for. You do see it in oral history collections but you can find it in examples in other format collections such as our music or pictures collections. It denotes what position the record holds in a formed collection which becomes very useful for you or your client to find related items that have been individually catalogued. In this record you can see that access to parts of the collection are restricted but you may also see notes like access conditions vary.

Essentially if you see anything that refers to a variety of access conditions within the same collection continue to scroll down the record to check the related records field. As you can see the variation in access conditions is because this is a top level record for the oral history project as a whole. Click on the See records in this collection, go down link to see the individual interviews and recordings. If a catalogue record is unclear you or your client are always welcome to contact us via our Ask a Library service for further assistance.

While we’re in our catalogue I’d also like to go over our digital resources. It is important to bear in mind that the bulk of our collection is currently in physical format of some type. Print books or serials, newspapers, microform material, objects, paintings, electronic carriers etc but we all know how popular digital resources can be, especially given that it is not always convenient to visit the Library in person. So we do try to provide a broad range of online resources to help, all of which are accessible to anyone resident within Australia.

Once again you can locate our online resources through our catalogue either with a targeted search or a broad search then use the narrow search option we discussed earlier to look only for e-resources. All online will be a combination of our digitised material plus any e-resources that we subscribe to for our patrons. If you’re interested specifically in material unique to the National Library’s collection then select the NLA Digital Material. The subscribed databases content is self-explanatory but we do also have a dedicated e-resources portal.

Pro tip, if you’re conducting a keyword search in our catalogue and then click into the e-resources portal it will carry over the same keyword search and automatically provide a results page. You can browse this list or start a new search as required.

I said before that you could look for e-resources through our catalogue. You can also browse our e-resources in the dedicated portal. To do this, select the Browse e-resources tab and have a look around. Bear in mind the three access levels, freely available, our licensed resources which require a National Library reader’s card to access offsite and the onsite resources which can only be used within the National Library building.

As with any other library we do constantly review what we subscribe to on our readers’ behalf so you may find there is the occasional change in our e-resources line-up. In fact three new resources that we have subscribed to are the Women’s Studies Archive, Political Extremism and Radicalism, Refugees’ Release and Resettlement. Within our licensed resources you will need a National Library reader’s card to access them. We do not offer organisation memberships but I can say that membership is free, available to all individuals resident in Australia and we can post the card to your postal address anywhere in Australia.

We often find that research is as much about learning what to look for as finding that one elusive piece of information. So we’ve developed research guides to help facilitate the practice of researching various complex subjects such as family history, map or industry standards. You can find our research guides here on our website. We like to think of these as a way to empower people to undertake their own research on their own terms and at their own pace. It can be a lot more restful than having someone stare over your shoulder while you remember how to spell [gearmouth] 12:20.

As you can see we have a range of different topics on which we provide guidance. Often these topics are raised from interactions or enquiries we’ve had from our readers or even experiences our reference staff have had trying to navigate our collections. We do continue to update and add guides where we can. In fact we recently added two completely new research guides, one on researching weather and the other on law reports and court records.

Continuing on the theme of development and in keeping with our mission statement the National Library also continues to explore ways we can collect and connect with as diverse a range of readers and researchers as possible. In fact we launched two new collecting projects for 2021 and 2022, one, collecting Fijian Australian Stories and two, collecting Chinese Australian Stories. It’s important for our cultural collections to adequately reflect the broad scope of cultures and experiences that make up Australia and we are always excited to hear from you or your patrons on how we can continue to collaborate on achieving this aim.

But it isn’t just our collection that must reflect the diversity of our readership, we also believe in nurturing our relationship with young Australians. We offer resources for teachers as well as professional and amateur researchers with our Digital Classroom. The modules align the Library’s collection with the Australian curriculum across a number of learning areas and year levels. It is a fantastically rich resource for teachers, students and teacher librarians. We regularly provide and update these as well so it’s worth keeping an eye out for new content coming in.

I’d like to mention one more resource in our learning section, the link to our webinar recordings and learning videos. This is probably more appropriate for older researchers but certainly we welcome younger viewers who may want to know about the AJCB project and how to access it in our collection. Here’s another pro tip, click the link to the Library’s YouTube channel to see the newest uploads in our learning session and Discovery video series. Discovery videos like this one can be shorter videos made to highlight a topic or a collection. We do also have longer format webinar recordings such as our introduction to our Asian language collections and our Indian Immigration Pass collections. Or this one on our E A Chrome Collection which covers the history of aviation in Australia. Every so often we also do discovery videos for a target audience that we think is exciting because yes, we do think the Library industry is exciting.

So in conclusion I hope I’ve touched on a few ways in which we hope to help you locate that elusive piece of research or help to guide your research journey or considered ways we can collaborate to develop as diverse a collection as possible.

Thank you for watching and good luck with your research.

I:          Thank you for joining us for today’s webinar with Trove and the National Library of Australia. I’m Rochelle –

R:        And I'm Romi, hello.

I:          And we work in Trove Partnerships for Trove Collaborative Services. This webinar aims to introduce you to searching Trove. The National Library of Australia acknowledges Australia’s first nations peoples, the first Australians as the traditional owners and custodians of this land and give respect to the elders past and present and through them to all Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

So what is Trove? Trove can be split into two parts. The first is that it is an online service developed by the National Library of Australia which brings together records describing items from collections in many different libraries and other institutions. Trove does not manage or hold any other items but if you are looking for a resource Trove can help you locate it if it is held by one of the hundreds of Australian libraries and institutions we are partnered with.

The second part is the digitised record part, the newspapers, photos and much more that you can see, read and search for on Trove. That’s a really basic description and Trove is a huge resource and is getting bigger every day. We can’t cover everything today but we are aiming to give you all a basic introduction to searching on Trove and are hoping to do more webinars in the future. This is what the Trove homepage looks like.

So let’s get started and today as mentioned we will be introducing you to searching Trove from basic searches through to searches with a little more detail. Roney, do you want to start us off?

R:        Yes, thanks very much. Let’s get started with doing a basic search. Trove has proven to be popular for doing family history research so let’s use that as an example to search with. I’m looking for a Jean Robertson who was a race car driver in the 1930s. Let’s use this information in our search. So on the Trove homepage go to the search field and enter the name. We’re doing a basic search so we’ll leave the category menu alone and select the green magnifying glass button to start searching across all Trove categories. Trove will then generate a search results list for Jean Robertson and variations for every category. The category options are available along the top row and vertically in the same order.

You’ll see that this vertical list offers newspapers and gazettes, magazines and newsletters etc just like the top row. From here it’s up to you where you want to go. The newspapers and gazettes category tends to be popular for a lot of family history research because they’re digitised and accessible immediately but if you’d like to preview the offerings first have a look at the vertical list. Sure enough there are articles that feature Jean Robertson and this list is showing the top three results. I want to see all of them now so I will select the See All button at the bottom right of the category. Now note that this button and the newspapers button back at the top row, they direct you to the same content. So for example if I wanted to see all the results for images I can select from the top row or go down to its equivalent in the vertical list and then select the See All button. Every category that has search results will have this button.

So let’s go back up to newspapers and gazettes and I will select the See All button. So here are all the newspapers and gazettes results for Jean Robertson and variations of the name. There are about 189,000 results available and you can sort them by relevance or date order with this dropdown menu. Now I’d rather not look through 180,000 results for the Jean Robertson whom I want so I’m going to narrow down this list by adding another search term. Let’s go back to the search field. You’ll remember that Jean Robertson was a race car driver so I’ll try adding the word, race. When I hit the magnifying glass button for a new search with these terms it has narrowed down the quantity by about a third but we can narrow down this list even more by using the Refine Your Results column on the right-hand side. As you can see there are sections that have a lot of offerings and to see them all you select Show More.

Every box that you check can narrow down your results by criteria such as type of item, place of publication, the publication title and even the date. The Jean Robertson I’m looking for was alive in the 1930s so I’ll narrow down my results by selecting Newspaper. I will choose a date range. So note that every time you select a checkbox the other options disappear. You cannot make multiple selections per most criteria in basic searches. It is possible to do this in advanced searching but that is something that we’ll explore in another webinar. So if you want to explore other options you will need to uncheck and start again.

So now I’ve been narrowed down to about 13,000 results, more specifically for Jean Robertson and race in the newspaper format and in this date range. You’ll also see that the new selections I made can be seen up here in the form of tags and you can remember them if you want by selecting the X. Now it’s just a matter of selecting what articles interest me. There are search results that span over quite a few pages and I can see each page by selecting from the page numbers along the bottom of the list but let’s go back up to the top now, we’ll stick with the first page.

Let's find an article that applies to our search. Let’s try this one. Here is my first selection with Jean Robertson highlighted in the original newspaper and its digitised text in the transcript column.

I:          It’s also important to note here that the National Library of Australia focuses on digitising newspapers published before 1954 on the general understanding that they are out of copyright. So generally on Trove only newspaper content that is published up to and including 1954 is available digitally. You’ll find that some newspaper titles published after 1955 are available. That’s due to individual agreements that were made with the publisher. If you need content published after 1954 it’s still possible to find on Trove, just not in immediate digitised form. If you contact Trove support we can put you in the right direction.

Now these are the results in newspaper gazettes. What if I want to find a name in another category like magazines?

R:        Yes, no problem, we can do that. So let’s go back to our search results page. Now remember that the keyword to be used can be applied to all Trove categories here. There’s no need to start a brand new search. So we’ve retained Jean Robertson and race and from here I can choose to see the results for Jean Robertson in images even or unpublished items but sticking with your suggestion, Rochelle, let’s select the magazines and newsletters category. It looks like I'm lucky here too. Let’s try this one.

Now when I select a magazine article I’ll be directed firstly to the record for the entire publication, select the read button to see your options. It turns out that there is an option that’s digitised which I’ll select and here is the magazine with instances of Jean Robertson and race highlighted. Note that this magazine here looks similar to the newspaper viewer. These blue boxes indicate the page numbers where the highlighted search terms appear in the magazine. You can scroll down and select the page that you want to see but remembering that our initial search found Jean Robertson on page 49 so we’re already where we need to be.

I’ll use my mouse to move around the original page by clicking and holding down as I move around and find the highlighted words and I can magnify in and out as necessary. So there’s race, let’s find Jean Robertson. There she is, Jean Robertson. Now to see the transcription text for this article I will select the text icon on the left-hand side. Now I’d like to find where Jean Robertson is mentioned here. If the transcript text is long I can scroll down until I find it or I can just do a word find command to locate the name. Generally you can do this by using the control and F keys on your keyboard and this will bring up the word find command box and I will enter Jean and see where that goes. Great. So here is where Jean appears in the transcript column and I can just press escape to get out of the word find command.

I:          That’s great. Is it possible to download something when you find it? It’d be great to keep a copy.

R:        Absolutely. There are a lot of digitised items in Trove that can be downloaded and if it is an option it will appear in the Trove viewer. Trove’s newspaper articles, for example, are one of the popular categories for downloading so I’ll use that to demonstrate. Let’s go back to our original search results and let’s select the newspapers and gazettes category and I’ll just choose the first available article. Now on the left-hand side there is an icon of a piece of paper with a downward-pointing arrow on it and that is the download button. When you select it choose whether you want to download the article or a whole page or the entire issue. Now if you choose page or issue, PDF will be the only format available. But I’ll choose to download the article which will give me more options.

Now text format will generate the article in a new browser tab. Text will generate the article in a new browser tab ready for use according to the options of your browser or computer. Image and PDF formats will have size options and you can select them before doing the download. The you just select the green view button and your image will be generated in a new browser tab ready for you to use. So a reminder that items on Trove are only downloadable if they are viewable in a Trove viewer such as the newspaper viewer I just demonstrated with and if they have the download icon available. If Trove directs you to view an item on an external website of a holding organisation such as a library or a gallery, if that site offers downloading it might have different methods to do it and I can show you examples of this while searching for an image.

So let’s start a new search from the Trove homepage. I’m going to search for the New South Wales town, Brewarrina, and I’ll look at the images, maps and artefacts category, magnifying glass button and images, maps and artefacts. There are lots of results here in many different formats available at various institutions and organisations such as maps at the National Library, photos from the Australian National University and here’s a photograph from the State Library of South Australia.

Now if you select the photo and select view you’ll see that that library is listed as its viewing option. Now when you select it you will be directed out of Trove and to the item record at the State Library of South Australia’s website and they will have their own download method. This library will also have their own conditions for access to the content. If you need assistance you’ll need to contact this library.

So let’s go back to our Trove search results to find images that I can download. You’ll notice that although these are search results for items matching Brewarrina they’re not all necessarily digitised or even accessible. This might be because the holding organisation hasn’t digitised the item yet or there’s a cultural safety consideration or the holding organisation only permits access to its own members or students. So I'm going to narrow down the results in the Refine Your Results column and in the access section I will select online free access.

Now understandably images are popular amongst family history researchers and particularly maps and a lot of them are available for free download in high resolution. So I will select a Brewarrina map. Let’s try this one. I’ll select the view option and here it is, in an image viewer. Here is the download button and it turns out that this map’s available in JPEG and TIF format and once you’ve selected you just press the Start Download or Download button. It’s that easy. So we’ve covered searching for a name and keyword in newspapers, magazines and images and how to download too. Rochelle, what else can people search for on Trove?

I:          People can also search Trove in languages other than English and we do have some amazing resources in a number of languages. So like any search we’ll start in the search box and enter our search term. In this case I'm going to use Yuma which is Gamilaraay, a first nation language from New South Wales, word for hello. Like any other search you can pick your category and either go down or up the top and today let's have a look at books and libraries. We can see that some results come up and again I’m going to look at Refine Your Results on the side here. A good one to look for when you’re doing language is Language. They’re the different languages there and this lets you filter for items in the language. It may be joint English in the language or purely the language you click on or perhaps multiple languages but a significant part should be the language you pick.

In this case let’s go Gamilaraay, there we go into results. So if I open the first one here you can see it goes through and I might click Reid and yeah, it’s digitised. Again highlighted. You can see that it goes through different vocab words and there is a lot in Gamilaraay.

R:        Rochelle, I also see that your search also accommodates the spelling of Gamilaraay with a G and K so you’re safe to try different versions.

I:          Yes. Thanks, will do. I’ll pass back to you.

R:        Well we hope that this introduction to Trove searching has been helpful to you. If you would like more information about searching and using Trove we recommend visiting the help page. This is a great starting point for you to find answers to a lot of questions. So just go to any Trove page and select the help link at the top right corner. The help sections contain a wide range of content that can answer your questions about using Trove from step-by-step searching instructions to managing your Trove account. Chances are that your question can be answered straight away and you can get on with your Trove research.

I:          This is also the place you go for help by making specific and advanced searches, information on first Australian content and how to use the Trove viewer for the item that you’re looking at. There’s also information about buying items, getting copies, copyright and help with using Trove on your computer system.

R:        Now if you can’t find what you need, if you have a specific question about using Trove or would like assistance with your research select the About tab at the top right corner of Trove pages. Go to the Contact Us section to select the type of enquiry you have.

I:          This section is helpful if you are doing family history research and you don’t know where to start, if you have a problem while using Trove or even if you have an interesting Trove experience that you’d like to share.

R:        Thanks very much for joining us and we wish you success with your Trove research.

I:          Thanks for joining us and good luck with your searching.

Hello, my name is Aaron and I'm the Digital  Education Co-ordinator at the National Library of Australia 

The National Library of Australia  acknowledges Australia's first nations peoples,  

the First Australians, as the traditional  owners and custodians of this land  

and we pay our respects to their elders, past  and present, and through them to all Australian  

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The National Library of Australia's collection  

is rich and varied. One of the ways we work  to connect our national collection to a  

national audience is through our online teacher  resource, the Digital Classroom.

The Digital Classroom launched in October 2015 and since  its birth it has reached over a million users  

and it receives consistent positive feedback from  teachers across the country and across the world. 

The Digital Classroom is designed not to be a  platform that has a start or a finish nor is it  

designed to be a repository for prescriptive  lesson plans that teachers must follow,  

it s designed to be a resource and an information  repository for teachers so that they can have the  

confidence and the tools to bring the national  collection held by the National Library  

into their classrooms. We at the National  Library are the experts in our collection  

but teachers are the experts in their classroom. Because the Library's collection is so rich and  

varied the Digital Classroom covers  a wide range of curriculum topics  

for a number of year levels from science, health,  history, English all the way through to PE.  

I'm going to present to you today the  latest edition to the Digital Classroom,  

the Asia-Pacific World, a three-part resource  exploring three distinct societies in the  

Asia-Pacific region during 700 to 1867 CE. The Asia-Pacific World module on the Digital  

Classroom is for teachers who are teaching or  preparing to teach Year 8 history. The Asia-Pacific  

World is the second of three depth  studies in the Year 8 history curriculum.  

Through depth studies students explore the  major empires that existed in the Asia-Pacific  

region during the early modern period with a  particular focus on the Angkor/Khmer Empire  

who ruled the area now comprised of modern day  Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and Myanmar  

between 802 and 1431 CE, Japan under the  succession of military governments ruled by  

the Shoguns from 794 until the Meiji Revolution  and the restoration of the monarchy in 1867 and  

finally Polynesian expansion across the Pacific.  This topic looks at the movement of peoples  

throughout the Polynesia Triangle and explores the  cultures of the societies that flourished there. 

For Year 8 history the focus is all about  the study of history from the end of the  

ancient period to the beginning of the modern  period, circa 650 to 1750 CE. That s when major  

civilisations around the world began to encounter  each other. It was during this time that the world  

started to become a more interconnected  place and dare I say it, a smaller one. 

For students who are undertaking the Asia-  Pacific depth study, exploration of the Khmer,  

Japanese and Polynesian societies in this period  is guided by the following inquiry questions.  

How did societies change from the end of the  ancient period to the beginning of the modern age?  

What key beliefs emerged and how  did they influence societies?  

What were the causes and effects of  contact between societies in this period?  

What significant people, groups or ideas from  this period have influenced the world today?  

These key inquiry questions are the  guides, the scaffolds that we use to  

build each Digital Classroom module and the  Asia Pacific World module is no exception. 

Throughout all the modules on the Digital  Classroom students will engage with a  

rich variety of sources drawn from  the National Library's collection.  

They will be challenged to draw on their own  knowledge and understanding and come to their own  

conclusions about the changes from the end of the  ancient world to the beginning of the modern age.  

Through using and interpreting primary and  secondary sources students will develop their  

historical knowledge and understanding  as well as their source analysis skills. 

Now let s have a look at the modules. You could  find the Digital Classroom in a number of ways.  

You can do a quick search, NLA Digital Classroom  and use the results here or you can visit the  

Library's home page, nla dot gov dot au. You can find  the Digital Classroom in the carousel here  

or you can follow the dropdown banners and  follow the links to the Digital Classroom. 

The structure of each Digital Classroom module  is consistent so it doesn t matter which one you  

re visiting, you can always find the information  you re after. Each module includes a page showing  

curriculum links which explicitly point out  which parts of the depth study will be covered.  

You can follow each link to the ACARA site to  see more information and further elaborations. 

The Angkor/Khmer module aims to give a  broad overview about the Empire and the  

time in which it existed. It will ask students to  evaluate what we do know about this time period  

but it will also get them to ask about what  we don t know about this time period. General  

capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities  are also woven into each module so each address  

not only the primary learning area, in this case  history, but also critical and creative thinking,  

literacy, intercultural understanding and  sutaibnltiy. For example the final theme in  

the Khmer Empire digital classroom looks at  the theory around environmental degradation  

as a factor leading to the decline of the empire. Each Digital Classroom module also includes a set  

of introductory questions or activities.  The introductory activities are a method  

of enabling teachers to lead their students into  the subject matter gently without jumping in cold.  

These gentle introductory activities are helpful  to gauge existing knowledge and help students to  

place the knowledge they already have in context  with the topic they re about to learn about. 

Mystery often surrounds life in the Khmer Empire.  

No physical printed records remain of  this time period. This is due to the  

climate. Lots of writings, be they personal  letters, government records, things like that  

were written on leaves, rice paper and even a  type of leather called vellum. In a climate such  

as Cambodia s these organic materials break down  very quickly and over the centuries none remain. 

To illustrate life in Angkor this  module draws on the Library s marvellous  

Yves Coffin Collection. This collection  contains over 1,300 images of Balinese,  

Cham, Javanese, Khmer and Thai art, architecture  and sculpture. This collection of evocative  

black and white photographs shows the ruins of  Angkor during the 1950s and 60s. Yves Coffin  

was a keen photographer and a member of the  French Consular services stationed in southeast  

Asia from the 1950s through to the 1970s. All the images featured on the Digital Classroom  

have been digitised by the National Library  and are fully available through our catalogue.  

They can be downloaded and used in the classroom  to accompany lessons, perhaps a source analysis  

activity in which students try to unravel a scene  and look for clues to life in Angkor at that time. 

Let s have a look at the Japanese module now. You  can see the Japanese module also has curriculum  

links and introductory activities but we re  going to have a look at the themes here. Each  

Digital Classroom module has a theme section. Each  theme is based loosely around the main curriculum  

points. You can see those reflected here in the  Japanese themes. So the curriculum points for  

the Japanese depth study are looking at the way of  life in Shogunate Japan including social, cultural  

and economic features, the role of the Tokugawa  Shogunate in imposing a feudal system in Japan  

and theories about the decline of the shogunate  including modernisation and westernisation. 

By thematically compartmentalising an often  complex topic such as Japan s relation with the  

outside world during the "Sakoku" or closed country  period teachers can dip in and out of the Digital  

Classroom as their time and lessons allows. The  Digital Classroom is not a set of chronological  

lesson plans that must be followed one after the  other but instead it s a repository of information  

and resources to help put important cultural  items held in the National Library's collection  

in context with the time period and events of  the theme that their students are learning about. 

The Japanese Digital Classroom module draws  on the Library s extensive collection of  

wood block prints, particularly the cloth  collection of Kuchi-e or frontispiece images.  

Like the Coffin collection in the Angkor  module many of these images have been fully  

digitised in all their colourful glory  and by following the links in the module  

they are accessible in the Trove viewer for  closer inspection, downloading or printing. 

Images like this can get students thinking about  the consequences of change during this time. This  

image here paints an interesting picture that  could be used to get students thinking about  

Japan's relationship to the west. It shows a scene  where a bride and a groom are perhaps meeting for  

the first time. The bride and her entourage wear  western-style clothing and the potential groom,  

a member of the imperial household or the  aristocracy, wears a western military uniform  

but all around are symbols of traditional Japan,  bonsai trees, tea ceremonies, the three ladies  

in traditional kimono seated on the floor, even  down to the symbols and motifs on the wall and  

upholstery. We can see here the chrysanthemum  motif, a symbol of Japan's imperial family on  

the chairs and curtains, perhaps giving some  clues to the status of the people in the room. 

What would it mean if the Emperor and his family  embraced the West and its ideals? How would it  

sit with forces loyal to the former Shoguns who,  for the most part, derided the West for so long? 

Let's now have a look at the third and final  module in the Asia-Pacific World resource.  

The Polynesian Expansion module is the latest and  final edition to the Asia- Pacific World resource.  

It looks at the spread of peoples across the  Pacific and their way of life and culture  

before the arrival of multitudes of  European explorers in the mid-1700s.  

Each of these topics within the Polynesian  module have been written by academics from  

the Australian National University who  specialise in the Pacific and Polynesian  

region. Using essays the Polynesian Digital  Classroom module can offer precise exploration  

of specific topics within the depth study. For  instance this essay investigates the relationship  

and environmental impact of Polynesian  societies on the islands where they settled.  

This one, Ancient rituals and  religious practices across the Pacific  

where this module explores  the theories and consequences  

of the movement of Polynesia's early settlers. Finally like all other Digital Classroom modules  

we can see here concluding activities. These  activities are a series of reflective activities  

and questions that give students an opportunity  to consolidate their knowledge. These activities  

can be used whether or not the teacher has  drawn on the rest of the Digital Classroom.  

They re also not prescriptive and we are  very happy if teachers want to use these  

as inspiration for other activities or learning  opportunities. We want the Digital Classroom to  

be a resource that inspires teachers to bring  the national collection into their classroom. 

For more information subscribe to the National  Library's e-news - you can find the link in the  

description to keep updated about new Digital  Classroom modules and other goings-on around  

the Library. If you have any questions about  the Digital Classroom or the Library in general  

please use our Ask a Librarian service. You  can find a link to this on our home page  

or you can use the link that is also in  the description.

Thanks for watching.

R: Hi, my name is Rowan Henderson and I'm a Senior Adviser in the Curatorial at Collection

Research section of the National Library of Australia. I'm joined by Philip Jackson, Program

Manager in Curatorial and Collection Research. Welcome to this discovery video in which Philip

and I will explore the PROMPT collection at the Library. Philip has worked for the Library's

Australian Printed Collections for the last 10 years and he will be sharing some of the

PROMPT collection highlights in this video. The rich culture of Australia's First Nations

people has included performance for tens of thousands of years. The National Library of

Australia acknowledges these First Australians as the traditional owners and custodians of

this land. We give respect to the elders past and present and through them to all Australian

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. So what is the PROMPT collection? The PROMPT

collection is a collection of collections that relate to the performing arts in Australia

from the 1880s until the present. It's a part of the Library's ephemera collection, held

in a special stack area. And what's ephemera? Ephemera is printed material that is usually

created for a particular purpose and not intended to be kept. In the Library we use the guide

that it s usually less than five pages long. It s mostly printed on paper but can also

include objects like hats, shirts and badges. It's often printed on flimsy material and

can be difficult to conserve. As the PROMPT collection relates to the performing

arts it mainly contains programs but may also include subscription, brochures, flyers, invitations

and tickets. Because of their size posters are stored separately, and magazines in the

Library's serials collection. The PROMPT collection is vast, it currently

contains 5,269 collections and uses over 300m of shelving. It documents a huge range of

topics such as prominent individuals in the performing arts, organisations and groups,

venues and performances and it covers genres such as pop, rock and folk music, opera, circus,

actors of stage and film, comedians, orchestras, theatre companies and performing art schools.

The people and places covered might be known in Australia and around the world or they

could be completely local and unknown elsewhere. The performers might not even be Australian

but if they performed in Australia they could be in the collection.

Why does the Library collect performing arts ephemera? The Library collects this material

so that the Australian community can now and in the future discover, learn and create new

knowledge. The Library's role is to develop and maintain a library collection including

a comprehensive collection relating to Australia and the Australian people. The Library collects

ephemera to document life in Australia, what has happened, where it was and who was involved.

In this case the collection documents the performing arts, to show what has been performed

and created in Australia at any point in time, by whom and where.

How does the Library collect it? The Library actively looks for ephemera to collect but

also relies on the public and collectors to let us know what is available. We also work

with other libraries so that they collect material relevant to their state or territory

while we collect items of national interest. If you re a collector and would like to offer

items to the Library for this collection you can do so through our website.

So how can you find out what is in the PROMPT collection? The Library has created a handy

new finding aid which lists all the collections under headings such as individuals, performances

and events, subjects and venues. You can explore it by searching our catalogue for the Guide

to the Australian Performing Arts Programs and Ephemera PROMPT Collections in the National

Library of Australia. If you're interested in donating ephemera

to our collection it would be appreciated if you could check our lists first to make

sure we don t already hold the same material. It s also important to remember that there

is other material in the Library s collection relating to the performing arts that is not

in the PROMPT collection. This material could be found in the manuscripts, pictures and

oral histories collections as well as in the Library s extensive collection of books. You

can search our catalogue to discover these other collections.

Now Philip is going to take us through some of the highlights of the PROMPT collection.

P: PROMPT is a theatrical term relating to an offstage reminder for an actor or singer

of the lines that they have forgotten and although it isn t exactly an acronym it may

have been something of an in joke to adopt this term for the National Library s collections

of programs and other performing arts memorabilia. Our collection is arranged into mini collections

by subject or topic which may be the name of a performer or performing arts company.

The collections range all the way through the alphabet. We have things from A to Z,

from Abba to Charles Zwar who was an Australian songwriter, composer, lyricist, pianist, music

director who mainly worked in England from the 1930s to the 1960s. He did the music for

All Square which is included in this program here and his name is in one of the chequerboards

on the front of the program. There may be earlier items but mainly the

collection consists of material from the 1880s onwards. In the performing arts exhibition

that we've got on at the moment there s a thing by Bland Holt who s one of our most

important early performers and impresarios. That exhibition shines a spotlight on the

National Library s performing arts collections. There are PROMPT files for Australians who

have achieved great fame overseas such as Dame Nellie Melba. In the show there's the

1902 ticket from Melbourne which is her home town where she got her name from and this

is a program from the first world war, a charity concert for Polish refugees.

As well as having achieved great fame overseas in London Peach Melba was named after her

by the great chef, Escoffier. In America there was even a packet of cigars named after her.

So this is a Flor de Melba cigar box, a thing which is probably not a very appropriate thing

for a singer. Other performers who feature prominently and on stage are Robert Helpmann

and he actually danced in this memorial matinee for Anna Pavlova. He did a duet with a Russian

ballerina from Swan Lake and at the other end of his career there s the program for

his state funeral where you can find a eulogy delivered by Don Dunstan, the former State

Premier of South Australia and a strong supporter of the arts.

Barry Humphries was another Australian who achieved great fame overseas. These are some

items from the PROMPT collection relating to an exhibition of her frocks. Cate Blanchett,

for her we cover her stage performances rather than her work as a film actor. So Kylie Minogue,

we concentrate on her live performances rather than her recorded sound which is really looked

after by the National Film and Sound Archive. So this is a program for Cate Blanchett from

a performance in New York with David Wenham and this is from Kylie Minogue's 1991 tour.

Opera PROMPT files include Dame Joan Sutherland and Richard Bonynge. Dame Joan also had some

food named after her. This is a menu from a restaurant in Wellington and there's a spinach

fettuccine named after her as well as the dessert at the end of the menu which is called

La Stupenda which was her nickname. As well as programs we have all sorts of material

so there were also some stamps issued to honour Dame Joan a few years ago as well.

There are other opera companies in the collection as well as Opera Australia, the big company

so there s the Pinchgut Opera which is a smaller opera company that concentrates mainly on

baroque music so this is a program of work from 1778 which they performed for a rare

time in Sydney in 2015. Ballet programs, we have things from Ballet

Russe who were one of the first big ballet companies to tour Australia in 1936. The Borovansky

Ballet Borovansky came from overseas but stayed in Australia for a long time and did much

to establish Australian ballet. Australian Ballet, we've got programs here on display

from the early 1960s and then 2000. This is a program honouring Graeme Murphy. There are

things from Bangarra as well, the Aboriginal dance company. In the exhibition there s a

full size copy of the poster for this program, Praying Mantis Dreaming with a wonderful part

by Libby Blayney and then there s a much more recent program there for Skin which is a program

by Bangarra that examines family kinship. Australian theatre has a huge range of material

in the PROMPT collection. We've only got one program here on display which is the Bell

Shakespeare Company s first production of Hamlet in 1991. The Tivoli Theatre was a big

circuit. It was linked to JC Williamson who was known as The Firm. They were a huge company

that was set up in 1882 and they ran theatre pretty much in Australia until 1976.

These two programs here are from 1939 and they brought in people like Anna May Wong

who was an actress from Hollywood and the Mills brothers who were African American singers.

The Tivoli also in the 1940s and 50s were a lot more risque than you might expect from

that conservative period. There are programs with chorus girls and can-can dancers and

that sort of thing. We've got musicals such as Jesus Christ Superstar.

There's a program from 1972 with a ticket. Instead of Phantom of the Opera well we do

have that as well, we've got Phantoad of The Opera which was a Brisbane parody of it from

1991. Wicked, a modern play and of course Tim Minchin's Matilda on display in the

On Stage exhibition. There's material related to traditional circuses

such as Ashton's who were established in 1932 and this particular program has a little caption

on it "Col and I went in 1967 and it was a very good show " so programs can be mementos

of a performance with a personal touch. More recently a more modern circus is Circus

Oz. This is a program from their seasons in the early 1990s. Circus Oz don't include any

animals in their circus but there are animals in the performing arts collections such as

Topsy who was a performing horse who could count, identify colours, play cards, do magic

tricks. Topsy toured eastern Australia performing mainly in the Gold Coast region in the early

1950s. This little item indicates that she gave command performances for horse lovers

like Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip in 1952, '54 and the Queen Mother in 1958.

There are also performing arts events for festivals, Adelaide Festival. That's from

the first one in 1960 and then there's the Garden of Earthly Delights from the Adelaide

Fringe Festival from only a few years ago and the National Folk Festival. There's a

poster from that in the On Stage exhibition and in the PROMPT collection there s a media

kit for the 50th anniversary of the festival in 2016 so the festival started in 1967.

The PROMPT collection contains a huge range of highly significant, evocative, beautiful

and fascinating material and whatever your personal interests may be there is probably

something in it that will amuse or entertain you.

Hi, I’m Jessica Coates from the Rights Management  Team in the National Library of Australia.  

The National Library has an amazing collection  of published and unpublished materials  

but in order to access and use these  materials you need to understand your  

legal rights and obligations in relation  to them. I’m here today to talk to you  

about one important part of this, copyright. At first I’d like to say that the National  

Library of Australia acknowledges Australia’s  first nations people, the First Australians as  

the traditional owners and custodians of this  land and gives respect to their elders past  

and present and through them to all Australian  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. 

So what is copyright? Copyright is  an area of law which gives creators  

rights to control how others can make use of their  creations. It lets them make decisions about how  

their works are copied, published, performed,  sold or even just distributed to others. 

Copyright exists to encourage people to  create. The logic is that allowing people  

to control how others will use their creative  works, at least for a period, will encourage  

people to create more material and to share their  creations with others which is good for us all. 

In Australia copyright is governed by the  federal Copyright Act 1968 meaning the  

same rules apply across Australia. It doesn’t  matter if the material was created overseas,  

as long as you’re using the material here  in Australia, Australian law applies. 

Copyright is extremely broad and covers all  types of materials from buildings to computers  

to Tweets. This includes almost all library  materials including literary works such as  

books and letters, dramatic works like  plays, artistic works like paintings or  

photographs and musical composition. It also  applies to films and sound recordings like movies,  

oral histories or even just home videos. These  materials are protected automatically as soon  

as they’re created even if they aren’t published  and even if there’s no copyright notice or date.  

It doesn’t matter if the work is professional  or amateur or commercial or private,  

the same rules apply. To a quick doodle on a  napkin or an oil painting or a CGI monster. 

For works covered by copyright you will usually  need the creator’s legal permission if you want  

to use it even for non-commercial uses like  just posting it to a blog or sharing it  

with someone else. Libraries won’t usually be  able to give you that permission themselves,  

this is because copyright is separate from  physical ownership so even if the Library  

owns a manuscript or a drawing, for example,  it won’t usually own the copyright in them  

but we’ll help you understand your rights and  obligations to use the material as much as we can. 

So when can you use copyright material?  

Copyright is extremely broad but the  good news is that it does have limits.  

For example copyright doesn’t stop you from making  use of ideas or information contained in a work,  

just the actual work itself. So while you  can’t copy the exact sentence or picture  

that’s been created you can build on the ideas and  knowledge the work contains. This is essential for  

all innovation and growth of human knowledge. Also copyright only allows a set amount of time.  

Once copyright ends the material is out of  copyright and is said to have entered the  

public domain. It can then generally be  freely used in any way you like subject  

to other rights such as indigenous, cultural  and intellectual property or just privacy. 

This is an essential part  of the copyright bargain,  

creators get to control their works  but only for a limited amount of time.  

If copyright lasted forever people wouldn’t be  able to build on the knowledge of the past and  

copyright would become a barrier to innovation  or cultural growth instead of encouraging it. 

While copyright doesn’t last forever  it can last a very long time.  

For most works in Australia the copyright term  is the life of the author plus 70 years. As such  

even very old works can still be protected  by copyright. But the good news is that even  

while a work is protected by copyright there are  some things you can do without permission. These  

are called exceptions. Exceptions protect uses  that are in the public interest like education,  

research or accessibility. They’re an essential  part of the copyright ecosystem and ensure that  

copyright doesn’t become a burden on daily life  or important human rights like freedom of speech. 

Without them we’d end up with absurd results like  kids needing to get copyright permissions to do  

their homework. I’ll tell more about exceptions  later but it is important to remember that even  

if the material you want to use is covered  by copyright and your use doesn’t fall within  

an exception it doesn’t mean you can’t do it,  just that you will have to get permission from  

the copyright owner. I’ll talk more about how  the Library can help you with that later too. 

So now some myths about copyright. Copyright is  extremely complex and this means that things that  

people think they know about copyright is often  not true. For example one of the most common  

myths about copyright is that it doesn’t apply  to private or non-commercial uses. Unfortunately  

this is not always the case. While there are  exceptions that do allow for our use in some  

circumstances like recording TV to watch later  or transferring your music to a digital device  

there is no general rule that says use is okay  just because they’re private or non-commercial.  

You will still need permission from the copyright  owner for a non-commercial use most of the time  

unless your use is covered by an exception. People also often think that you don’t need  

permission to use copyright material if your use  is fair. This is because the US has an exception  

that allows general fair use of copyright material  but Australian copyright law doesn’t go this far.  

One of the exceptions I mentioned earlier  does allow fair dealings but only if  

they are one of a list of permitted  purposes set out in the Copyright Act.  

These include research and study, criticism and  review, parody and satire, reporting the news,  

judicial advice or accessibility. You can find out  more about fair dealings and other exceptions from  

the Australian Libraries and Archives Copyright  Coalition or the Australian Copyright Council. 

Similarly many people believe that as long as  you’re only using 10% of a work or a small part,  

your use is okay. While there is a rule  under Australian law that lets you use an  

insubstantial part of copyright work it only  applies to amounts that are less than 10% and  

can be very hard to apply. You can’t usually rely  on it for things like quotes, clips or samples.  

Luckily you can quote material without permission  under the fair dealings exceptions and copying  

10% would usually be covered by that but remember  it has to be for one of those specified purposes  

like research and study. If you just want to  quote a work for artistic effect, for example  

in a blog or a remix work or even a book, you will  usually need permission from the copyright owner. 

It's also very common on the internet for people  to use copyright material like background music in  

a video and then to credit the author. While  this is always a good idea to attribute the  

creator of the material that you’re using and is  actually a legal requirement under Australian law,  

this doesn’t replace permission. You will  still infringe copyright if you don’t have  

permission or a relevant exception even  if you say no infringement intended. 

Finally as we said before copyright  in Australia does last a very long  

time. Many people believe that you can use  copyright material once the author has died  

but some materials will be protected for  more than 150 years after they’re made.  

It’s usually best to assume something is  still in copyright for at least 100 years  

unless you know for sure that this  isn’t the case. The good news, though,  

is that some materials do have shorter copyright  terms. For instance anonymous works or works where  

you don’t know anything about the author will  have a copyright term of 70 years from creation  

or publication and government works only have a  copyright term of 50 years. But if you don’t know  

much about the work or its creator it’s best  to assume it is still covered by copyright.  

Don’t worry, we’ll do our best to help you work  out if and how you can make sure of it anyway. 

Because copyright applies to most library  materials and to most uses you want to make  

of those materials it’s important to  consider copyright whenever you want  

to use our collections. If you just want to  look at or read material onsite at a library  

you don't usually have to worry about  copyright but if you want to make a copy  

or have the Library make a copy for you or  even just use the Library material in some  

downstream way like publishing it as part of your  research you do need to think about copyright. 

Luckily there are specific exceptions of  the Copyright Act that give you the right  

to use material for purposes like research  even without permission from the copyright  

owner. Similar exceptions also allow the  Library to supply material to you if you can’t  

make it onsite ‘though this is only in certain  circumstances and if you comply with set rules. 

You will usually be able to copy small parts  of copyright work for research purposes without  

permission. This includes photocopying  the material and taking photographs with  

your own device. You can usually find  signs near the Library photocopiers or  

at the desk that will give you more information  about when you can copy material and how much. 

If you want to copy more than a small amount of  material or want the Library to copy the material  

and send it to you, you will generally need to  talk to the Library to find out if any permissions  

are required. Access to some of our materials,  especially special collections such as manuscripts  

and oral histories, may also be restricted  for reasons other than copyright such as  

privacy or cultural sensitivity. Other works like  electronic materials might be limited by licence  

so it’s important to check before copying  any more than a small part of our material. 

The first step to obtain information about using  National Library materials is to check the entry  

in the catalogue or on Trove. There you’ll be able  to find basic information about their author and  

publisher and their copyright status including  whether they’re available to access to copy.  

In the National Library this information  is determined by an algorithm based on  

information we have in our catalogue. So it’s  intended as an estimate and may not be accurate.  

If we don’t have enough information or if the  rights are particularly complex sometimes it  

will come back uncertain. You shouldn’t  rely on it instead of formal legal advice  

but it can give you a good indicator  of how you can use the material. 

A lot of our collection is in the public domain  and doesn’t have any other restrictions on access.  

If there’s a digital copy of these kind  of materials online you can often download  

them straight from our website and get them  immediately but if the copyright status is  

unclear or restrictions apply or if you want to  do something complex like publishing the material  

you will normally need to go to Ask a Librarian  on our website. There you can ask a question  

about using the material or put in a request  for the Library to supply a copy to you. 

Once you tell us exactly what you  want to use and how you want to use it  

we’ll usually be able to tell you if your  use is allowed or if permission is needed.  

If permission is required it will usually be up  to you to contact the copyright owner yourself  

but the Library will help you as much  as we can with the information we have.  

Once you do have permission for your  use we can supply the material for you. 

We will usually ask you to comply with  a few conditions of use like respecting  

the moral rights of the creator. You will have  to credit them as the creator whenever you use  

the material and you musn’t treat the work in  a derogatory way. These are legal requirements  

under the Copyright Act and can’t be waived. If you’re publishing the material or using it in a  

public way we will also usually ask you to  credit the Library as the source of the material.  

This helps others to know where they can find  the original if they want to make use of it  

themselves and generally helps us to increase  knowledge of and access to our collections. 

To find out more about using copyright in  the Library’s collection go to our website,  

Copyright in Library Collections. You can find it  via the Copyright link at the bottom of each page  

of our website. By clicking on that link you’ll  be taken to our copyright portal which includes  

a direct link to Copyright in Library Collections  as well as other useful copyright information. 

There are also some great resources on Australian  copyright law online. Two good places to start are  

the Australian Libraries and Archives Copyright  Coalition and the Australian Copyright Council. 

Thanks so much for joining me today to find out  more about copyright in the National Collection.  

The Library’s strongest purpose is to make  sure that all Australians can access and use  

our material and knowing how to navigate  copyright is an important part of that.  

If you do have any questions or are just not quite  sure about anything about copyright please do  

get in touch with our Ask a Librarian service  and we’ll see what we can do to help you out.

Hello and welcome to this learning webinar  about the Indian Emigration Passes to Fiji  

as held in the National Library of Australia  s collection and freely available online.  

The National Library of Australia acknowledges  Australia s First Nations Peoples,  

the first Australians, as the traditional  owners and custodians of this land  

and gives respect to the elders past and present  

and through them to all Australian Aboriginal  and Torres Strait Islander peoples.  

We also acknowledge the National Archives of  Fiji as custodians of the original records  

and we thank them for making this collection  available to researchers around the world.  

Hello, my name is Judith, I m a reference  librarian here at the National Library Reader  

Services Team. Joining us is my colleague, Jack. Hello everyone, I m Jack and together with Judith  

we ll be taking you through  this presentation today.  

Today we ll be looking specifically at how to find  the records for the Indian labourers who travelled  

to Fiji in the period 1879 to 1916. We ll start  with a brief overview of the indentured labour  

system, what it was and its legacy to Fiji. Next we ll take a look at the records themselves,  

what records exist, what they describe and  where to find them. Last, we ll look at all  

important access information, we ll talk you  through how to access these records for your  

research purposes with some case studies. But let s start with the historical context  

for these records. When we started looking at  this topic the thing that struck me the most was  

that these records don t exist in a vacuum, these  records with real names and real faces to history  

and it is a history that can be a  little bit confronting at times.  

For example, later in the session we ll look at  the record for Daulat who was a two-and-a-half  

year old son of indentured labourers and  Daulat is just one name out of 60,965 men,  

women and children who travelled from India  to Fiji under the indentured labourer system.  

So the labourers are often  known by the term girmityas  

which comes from girmit. It s a borrowing  from the English word agreement which was used  

to designate the indentured labour system. Once we understand who these records talk  

about it links us to an understanding of what  they experienced, what their lives looked like  

and takes them from a name in the record to a  lived reality. For example a paper presented to  

the Indian History Congress in 2001 gives  this description of living conditions.  

The coolies were accommodated in long sheds,  partitioned into 10 feet by 7 feet cubicles  

within which the system of indentured labour  was practised on the old slave states.  

Other accounts talk about the brutality of  the work, the homesickness for a country and  

family left beyond and the difficulty of finding  a place in a deeply segregated colonial society.  

All of this is crucial information  for those researching family history,  

colonial history and indentured labour. But we  ll start, what actually is indentured labour?  

So the short simplified answer is that a reliance  of indentured labour can be traced back to the  

abolition of slavery in the British Empire, back  in the 1830s so the loss of a plentiful supply of  

slaves led to a labour shortage on largescale  sugar, coffee, tea, cocoa, rice and rubber  

plantations. So to counteract this the powers that  be tapped into existing indentured labour systems  

and indebted labour systems to source workers. India as you can imagine was an extremely  

convenient source for cheap labour so workers  were recruited under both the indentured and  

free labour system but under the indentured labour  system workers were contracted to travel to the  

plantations and work for a set number of years. In the case of emigration to Fiji the fixed term  

was five years, the answer to overseers  and estate managers and beyond the less  

than luxurious conditions that we ve already  mentioned workers could be criminally prosecuted  

if they left the estate. They then had to pay  their own way back to India after they d worked  

their five years so there was a possible free  passage after 10 years of industrious service.  

There was meant to be a quota of  women brought to the plantation  

but numbers were usually far below target and we  now know that women were particularly oppressed  

under the system and faced incredible hardship.  But despite those conditions many girmitiyas  

stayed in Fiji where they  developed a unique culture,  

society and they played a vital role in Fijian  history. The past was never forgotten however and  

you ll find many girmitiyas and families continue  to maintain or reconnect with their Indian roots.  

So why were these records  particularly important, Jack?  

So these records are widely acknowledged to be so  

important because they re one of the only sources  that really document indentured labour in Fiji.  

In fact in 2011 the combined records  of Indian indentured labourers of Fiji,  

Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago were placed  on the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.  

The original documents themselves are  held in the National Archives of Fiji.  

These were created and maintained by the British  administration during the colonial period.  

They document many elements surrounding the  indentured labour system. Later the records  

were microfilmed and given to a small number  of libraries and archives around the world  

to enable people to consult their collection.  Family history researchers in particular made  

heavy uses of these passes to trace family back  to India and in many cases they were able to  

reconnect with the original villagers and even  family of their indentured ancestors. So in this  

way the records are a unique resource that is able  to connect people through time and distance.  

Are there other relevant records that the  Library or any other institution holds?  

There are. So the National Archives in the UK hold  many relevant records, not just indentured labour  

in Fiji but also other colonies. The Fiji Archives  also hold other material including the official  

government records. Birth, death and marriage  records are also held by the Fiji Registry of  

Births, Deaths and Marriages. Finally the National  Library of Australia also holds some relevant  

records from the British administration and these  are part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.  

The relevant material comes from the Colonial  Office series and mainly covers administrative  

matters including information about ships  and voyages. These are also available online.  

You might like to look at our AJCP  learning webinar and finding aids if  

you are interested in these documents. We should also mention just keep in mind  

that when you are looking through these records  and searching for this content the language  

used is very much of the period so some of it  may be offensive from a modern perspective.  

Now I know the National Library has long supported  researchers using this collection by providing  

access in our reading rooms and through  our copying, lending and reference services  

however recognising the  importance of the collection  

and particularly its heavy use amongst  the Fijian, Indian and other communities  

the Library has digitised a complete collection of  over 60,000 passes and other related collections  

so these are now freely and fully available  online from anywhere in the world.  

I do remember before they were digitised we had a  family of dedicated researchers who came to visit  

us from interstate and they were here for must  have been almost two weeks from open to close  

poring through the thousands of different frames  under microfilm, thousands of different passes.  

One evening there was a shout of jubilation in  the reading rooms when they d managed to discover  

the passes they were looking for but having  this material online really does simplify  

access and makes it much easier for everybody  to track down their indentured ancestors.  

Yeah, absolutely. Hopefully a few more shouts in  living rooms when they discover more records.  

Before we show you how to access the digitised  records we will quickly run through the different  

series and what information they hold. So there  are 17 separately listed items in our catalogue  

as you can see here but these can be grouped into  a smaller number of more important categories  

so these are the General Register of Indian  Immigrants, 1879 to 1916, Repatriation Registers,  

Death Registers, Plantations Registers and finally  the emigration passes themselves which are the  

most important due to their detail and because  the pass number serves as a unique identifier.  

Now you did have to explain to me what we  meant by unique identifier in this case, Jack.  

Well it works like the number on your  passport or your driver s licence number.  

So like a registration number? Exactly, you ll see it popping up on  

other records and even things on marriage  and birth certificates. It s almost like  

a shorthand way of identifying a person. The first type of record that we mentioned  

was the General Register. Could you  explain a little bit more about that?  

Absolutely. So the General Register, it has  two main parts. There s the list of ships  

carrying indentured labourers and then there  will be the full list of indentured labourers  

within each ship. These are ordered by pass number  and you ll see that the names are arranged by  

male, female, boy, girl and infants. Within these  the names are arranged by alphabetical order.  

Early records include the name, father s  name, age, sex, vessel, date of arrival, name,  

cost of passage, employer and  remarks. Later records contain  

more information. This example from Book  9 includes columns for extension order,  

re-indentures, marriage, death, return to India  and others. So it s important to note that many  

of these columns are incomplete and may not be  comprehensive. For example repatriation or a death  

may not be included here but there s still a  wonderful amount of information in this register.  

Great. The next one we mentioned was repatriation  registers. Now these come under a variety of names  

such as the Alphabetical List of Fiji Born Indians  Repatriated to India, 20 December 1924 to 30,  

August 1930 or Nominal Roles of Indians  Repatriated to India, 1916 to 1947.  

For example here is one on pages from the Nominal  Roles. It s important to note that these records,  

it wasn t just those who were born  in India who were repatriated,  

descendants of original indentured  labourers are also listed  

and could have been given passage. So free passage  was available once certain conditions had been met  

including number of years worked and time spent  in Fiji. Travellers mostly returned on the same  

ships that were bringing labourers out to Fiji so  the information recorded typically includes name,  

father s name, pass number, ship of return  or ship of arrival and sometimes caste.  

There are also several volumes of  death registers of indentured Indian  

emigrants working on plantations. These are  generally organised chronologically but there  

are some that are arranged by plantation  instead. Details are generally fewer than  

those found in other series but typically  you can find pass number, the ship name,  

the date of indenture, plantation, employer,  date of death and the cause of death as well.  

Finally we have the plantation registers.  Now these are another digitised collection  

that can provide essential detail  about an indentured ancestor.  

Not all the registers have survived unfortunately  and some are very incomplete but each plantation  

should have an entry with a list of indentured  labourers working on the property. Details  

supplied are normally the pass number, name, ship  of arrival, sex, age, date of indenture, term,  

pass number, relations and sometimes details  related to repatriation or death. These can be  

really useful to trace who your ancestors were  working with and other personal connections.  

So it sounds like all of these different records  do have slightly different information on them  

and it looks like there s some overlap  but unique things in every one.  

So they would be fairly interconnected and  that would give us some options on how to  

cross-reference them, wouldn t it? Yeah, exactly.  

Alright in that case let s move on to  the emigration passes themselves.  

These are generally the most sought after  documents for those researching your family  

history. As we mentioned earlier the pass number  is an important detail that was used in other  

areas. The passes contain the most genealogical  information from all the records and were also  

more systematically recorded. If possible this  is the record you should try to locate. There  

are separate passes for men, women, boys, girls,  infant boys and infant girls. These are split into  

different sections for each ship, the men are  recorded first then the women then the children  

then the infants. As with the general register  it is by alphabetical order within these groups.  

Judith, do we have any more  information about how these passes  

were filled out? Did it happen in India? In Fiji? Well actually a little bit of both so these passes  

were filled out before embarkation at one of the  immigration depots in India. The depot s surgeon  

was responsible for correctly filling out the  details. The passes were then given to the Master  

of Transport to compare with the ship s lists and  this is where they were given a ship s number.  

Once the vessel had arrived in Fiji the  passes were returned to the labourers and  

assigned a pass number from the General  Register that we mentioned before.  

That sounds like a lot of recordkeeping  but are there mistakes in the passes?  

Yes so one crucial point here is that the Depot  Surgeon was responsible for transcribing personal  

and place names so spelling mistakes and errors  are common, particularly when you have a language  

or cultural disconnect. There is a lack of  consistency even within passes on the same ship.  

So the information recorded remained  almost identical over the years. This is  

an example from the first arrival of indentured  labourers that were on board Leonidas in 1879.  

The pass number is right at the top, number one  in this case. Listed below are many other fields,  

for example we have a ship s name, the  ship s number, the location of the depot,  

the date, the depot number, the caste,  father s name, age, the zilla which is  

a kind of county subdivision, Pergunnah5 which  was a smaller division of a zilla, the village,  

occupation, name of next of kin, if married,  to whom, marks and a range of signatures.  

Here is an example of a pass of the Sutlej in  1916 so this was the last group of indentured  

labourers to emigrate. Note the fingerprints that  appear on the right-hand side of passes from the  

later voyages. Some of the terminology has also  changed slightly but the recorded information  

is very similar. So Jack, it seems like  the pass number is the most important  

in terms of following the records but are  any of the other numbers useful on here?  

Absolutely. So some of the other numbers  can also be used for tracing family members.  

Let s just have a look at the depot  numbers in a little bit more detail.  

We ll start let s have a look at this pass, 1332.  See the section where it has the name of next of  

kin? It says mother of 786. As these were filled  out in the depot it is important to know that the  

786 in this case refers to depot number 786 and  not pass number 786. Now the depot numbers can  

be difficult to find as they re not in order but  in most cases they will be in the same voyage.  

We've done some digging beforehand and we ve found  some with a depot number 786 and this is with the  

pass number 13542. Checking this pass we can see  that the relation is confirmed with the text,  

son of 785. We can imagine the mother waiting  with her son as the forms are filled out one  

after the other and this explains the close  depot numbers. Sometimes you ll find a whole  

section of your family undertaking the same  trip with these consecutive depot numbers.  

So as you can see there are many types of  records but the most important for tracing family  

are the emigration passes so these are a  rich source of genealogical information and  

can provide you a direct link back  to a location or family in India.  

Now we ve given you the background and overview  of the records, we want to show you how to access  

them and use them for your research. Using a  case study of a family we will show you what  

indexes are available through different websites  and how to use these to search the passes. Next,  

how our research guide lets you browse the passes  including demonstrating how to download images and  

find permanent links. Then we ll show you how to  access some of the other resources we mentioned  

earlier before touching on using civil  registration records to locate pass numbers.  

So as we mentioned, particularly if you are new  to this research, one of the best places to start  

when researching passes is on our research  guide. As well as background information  

about the records, the arrangements and how  we can help you, you will see some important  

links so on the right-hand side you can see the  link to girmit.org website and to the National  

Archives of Fiji. So the Girmit website provides a  searchable index of indentured labourers that was  

put together using data from the National Archives  of Fiji who also provide the same data as a pdf.  

So if I click the link to open up the Girmit page  you will see that it is a work in progress and has  

not yet been finished so it means that the  records indexed only run from A to M however  

this is still an extremely important  resource and if your ancestor s names  

fall into this range it should be your first  step. Let s have a look at a common name, Daulat.  

So I ve gone into the D section and you can  see up the top here there is a search bar.  

Now I can start typing to see a full list of  results or if you have doubts about the spelling  

used as Judith mentioned earlier I can also  scroll down until I find the relevant section.  

In this case I will use a search and we ll see  that there are quite a few results for the same  

name. So this means that if your ancestor s  name has quite a few results you may need to  

search through several different passes to verify  that it is the pass that you are looking for.  

Let's have a look at Daulat, son of  Ramcharan who came out on board The  

Sangola so the pass number here is 37082. Okay, let s come back to our research guide  

now that we know the pass number. On the left-hand  side of the screen you can see some subheadings  

and as we now know the pass number  we can go straight to Access by Pass  

so if you click on that and then scroll  down until you find the right range.  

So we re looking for 36318 to 37171. Right so  click the View Online Link to go into the viewer.  

So you can see the pass number  noted at the top of that form.  

Using the side bar at the top scroll across so  we can get closer to the page number that we  

re looking for or rather the pass number  that we re looking for which is 37082.  

Just keep going a little bit further  

and once we get close we can just use the  arrows to go page by page to the right pass.  

So we will get there, 37082 and here we  go. Here's the genealogical information  

that we can now use to trace the  family back to India as well.  

I m just going to pause us there for a second  cause we did want to talk about how to download an  

image of this one. So now that we have the pass,  on the left-hand side of the screen you ll see  

that there is a download icon. If we click this  you ll see there are several different options  

and we have different formats, a jpeg and a  pdf. Just note that if you do choose the jpeg  

it will be a compressed file and you will need  to unzip this before you can view the image.  

Now the other important thing is  that if you click all images here  

this will include the passes for everybody  that came out on board that ship. If you  

re only interested in a single pass, Daulat s  pass in this instance, click current and this  

means that when you download you will only  download this single image for this pass.  

But hang on, what if we only want to link back to  this record rather than download the whole thing?  

Absolutely so you also have the option to  use it like if I click on a sight icon now  

you ll see that we have the work and image options  again. The work once again will be for the whole  

shipload and will include all the passes and it  will take you to the beginning of that sequence.  

If we choose image you ll see that this  image identifier will take us directly  

to this pass every time and this is a stable  permanent link that you can use in your records  

that you ll always come back to this record. That's fantastic. So looking at the pass  

it s mentioned here that his father is listed as  next of kin and that Daulat is only two-and-a-half  

years old so could we assume in that case  that he came out with a family member?  

I think it s a pretty good assumption and  it s possibly the father as this is who  

has been listed by the Depot Surgeon. Let  s return to the research guide and have a  

look at how we would search. We ve assumed  that the ship and the date are the same  

and so we can click through the records  until we find possible matches.  

But if we wanted to go through more quickly  we could always use the General Register  

that we talked about earlier so you ll find  a link to the General Register in the Other  

Further Resources tab. If you follow the link  through to the Viewer once we find the resource,  

just over there, click through into the Viewer  

and when browsing the collection you're  looking for the appropriate date range  

so we re looking for The Sangola that departed in  February 1908 so the date range for that would be  

Collection Book 7. Once that loads just up the top  here you can see it s listed as arriving in March.  

So we now need to look through to see  where the relevant section starts.  

Again you can use that top  taskbar to scroll through  

and we re looking for The Sangola, February 1908.  

We should have him here  

and here we are. We ve found a pass number 36580.  

Wonderful so that was a great tip,  Judith, cause this way we didn t need to  

click through every individual pass,  we could just go through the register.  

Let s go back to our research guide and we ll  select Access by Pass Number again to find this  

pass, just here. Once again it s pass number  36580 so we ll go back to the research guide,  

Access by Pass Number so same voyage that  we were looking at before, here we are.  

So we need to click through until we  find 36580. Alright, almost there.  

Here we are, we ve found it. Okay so let  s compare the details with Daulat s pass.  

It looks like we have a match, we ve  got the same caste, the same district,  

the same thana and the same village. Yeah, what s really interesting here as  

well is that there s a wife listed with the depot  number as well so this is another great piece of  

information that can lead you to another search.  We won t go through the whole process again,  

as you can see it takes a little bit of  clicking through but we do recommend that  

it would be easier to go back to the General  Register at this point to find the pass number.  

We have done the research beforehand and  we found that it s pass number 37048.  

Alternatively if you think the spelling might  be inaccurate you could also browse through  

the passes looking for a depot number. These are  unfortunately not listed in the General Register.  

Let s just note the ships did make  many voyages and so you may need  

to look through quite a number of ships if  all you have is the ship name and no date.  

Let s go back to our research guide and have  a look at the Access by Ship for a little bit  

more information so we ve got Access by Ships  Name. Imagine that we were looking for someone  

and we only know that they came aboard The  Ganges. If we look at the relevant section  

here you ll see that it made seven trips so this  could involve quite a lengthy search if you had  

no other information. It is possible but if  there are other documents what might help  

this is where you try and take a shortcut. We talked about the number appearing on  

some other documents earlier, could  these be helpful locating the passes?  

Oh absolutely so an approach that can provide  breakthrough information in some cases uses  

the Fijian civil registration records so  these are marriages or birth certificates.  

So if a girmitya was married according  to the ordinances of the Colony of Fiji  

a number of details had to be included with the  registered number such as the pass number, the  

name of ship, plantation where they were assigned  and sometimes the pass number you will also find  

on the birth certificates if a child s born to  girmityas. So as you mentioned before the pass  

numbers was a shorthand way of identifying the  parents. Please note that to get a copy of these  

certificates you will need to contact the Registry  of Births, Deaths and Marriages back in Fiji.  

We have a link to the Registry on the  research guide itself just up here.  

This brings us to the end of the presentation  today about using the Indian Emigration Passes  

to Fiji. We ve covered the background  to the indentured labour system.  

How the records are arranged  and what information they have.  

Then we showed you how you can  access these resources online.  

The case study we presented should have provided a  

good indication of the nuts and  bolts of using this collection  

and how you can trace your family through them. Of course if you get stuck and need some tips  

or advice don t hesitate to reach out to  us through our Ask a Librarian service.  

We hope you ve enjoyed the presentation and have  come away with some new information.  

8 Transcribed by audio.net.au

hello my name is gareth i'm a digital

preservation coordinator here at the

national library of australia the

national library of australia

acknowledges australia's first nations

peoples their first australians as the

traditional owners and custodians of

this land and gives respect to the

elders past and present and threw them

to all australian aboriginal and torres

strait islander people

one of the most challenging aspects of

digital preservation is not the actual

work but surprisingly it's explaining

what it is to people

think of it as as a digital equivalent

of physical conservation so the library

has books manuscripts artworks and many

other objects

and they might require treatment from

time to time if covers or spines are

damaged or there's rips and tears in

paper

the library has a dedicated team to

treat these physical items to keep them

stable and accessible to users

likewise the library has a growing

collection of born digital publications

images and personal archives

and you might not think it but digital

objects in my opinion are even more

fragile and require a lot more attention

and treatment to help keep them stable

and accessible

my background is in linguistics and

mandarin chinese so it even comes as a

surprise to me that i've ended up here

in digital preservation

more so because i didn't even know the

difference between a jpeg or a png file

or an mp3 and mp4

so how did i possibly end up here

well i was given an opportunity to

define a few terms for a project that

has become quite a significant area of

work both here at the library

and in the field of digital preservation

itself

this one little opportunity has opened

my mind to the importance of digital

preservation

what we do is a balance of practical

work future planning and applied

research to look after and ensure access

to the library's growing digital

collections

but before we can do any of that the

most important thing is to get content

off carriers

as they come into the library and into

manage storage

so that we do not lose the content

and what i've been what i mean by

physical carriers

is cds dvds hard drives etc

fortunately this is a shared

responsibility across the library and

that frees up our time to focus on other

important digital preservation work

there are some pretty straightforward

questions that guide digital

preservation and in fact these are

questions that you can ask at home as

well

which file formats exist in these

digital collections can the library

provide access to the content of these

of these file formats to users with the

software that it has

do we need additional software or

professional software

will the library be able to continue to

provide access to the content of these

formats in the future and if not what do

we need to do about it now

the practical and applied research that

we do go hand in hand

our digital preservation system

preservica produces reports on the two

million files it currently holds we

analyze these these reports weekly to

determine whether the library holds new

file formats whether there are any

corrupted files or any other issues that

we need to be aware of that involves a

lot of research into understanding the

file formats that we have

known issues that these file formats

might have and the software that

supports them

so if i may paint a picture of what this

looks like

cast your mind back to the matrix movie

can you see that green screen full of

binary code and other symbols raining

down

well my monitors look a bit like that

too they're just not green

and to stress how cool the work is we

are time travelers we are always jumping

between earlier operating systems to run

old applications from the years past

so just the other week i was in pc right

from 1983 in an old dos 3 environment

the library holds approximately three

petabytes of digital content and that's

around 15 billion

files i should say that this number

doesn't include all the backups either

three petabytes of digital content would

be around the same as three thousand one

terabyte hard drives

or if we were to convert that to the

average storage size of a phone today

which is around 256 gigabytes

we would have just under 12 000 phones

of data

it's amusing to remember at least to me

that 10 years ago we weren't talking in

terabytes but now we all are

it's only a matter of time before we're

talking about petabytes at home as well

some people might not realize that

digital content that we create requires

active management to ensure their

longevity and a big part of this is

looking after storage

so what are some of the typical

challenges

the volume of the digital content we

create is huge we are taking more photos

and videos creating more documents than

ever before and the file sizes are

getting bigger

yes

storage might be relatively cheap but

what are you going to do about the

quality of your own collections

are you deleting what you don't want to

keep

and are we really backing up our content

the impression i get when talking to

friends and family is that they're not

backing up their content so precious

photos and videos are stored solely on a

mobile phone or on the computer and

nothing else

now i might talk a bit about the rise of

the convenient cloud storage yes this is

great

be warned those providers are not

responsible if your content is lost or

become corrupted so you need to do your

own backups as well

and whilst we're talking about backups

hard drives

they fail just like any other physical

carrier so the best practice is to

replace your backup hard drives with new

ones once every five years or if you

notice any performance issues sooner

the library has a large number of all of

the common carriers you have around your

homes today in its collections

so i'm talking about cds dvds usb sticks

hard drives among others

the library also has a large number of

legacy carriers too and i dare say many

viewers will have these around their

homes as well

they include three and a half inch and

five and a quarter inch floppy disks

the library also has some other rare

carriers as well including jazz discs

zip discs and side quest

cartridges as i've stressed before we

ideally only access these carriers once

to transfer the content to manage

storage

some carriers can be processed by us and

colleagues on everyday computers

the three and a half inch floppy disks

can be processed on everyday computers

with the help of a usb floppy drive

other carriers however such as the five

and a quarter inch floppies require

legacy computer setups or professional

equipment depending on the flavor of the

floppy disks

this is the perfect opportunity to tell

everyone one simple message get your

content off those physical carriers that

might be hiding around your house and

garage and put it all into one managed

storage and that's typically your

computer

if you don't those carriers will

eventually fail and whatever content is

on it will be lost as well

so let's make it fun let's create a

digital preservation project at home

round up all of the carriers you have

and assess what kind of content they

contain or might contain if possible

and determine which carriers you want to

process

now it's time to transfer the content

some carrier types will be easy to

process yourself whilst others might

require assistance

fortunately some of the carriers at a

greater risk of failure are the ones

that are the easiest to process so let's

do them first

and they are the cds dvds usb sticks and

all of the other small hard drives that

you have around the place

now what about the three and a half inch

floppy disks and zip drives

if you don't have a computer with a

three and a half inch floppy drive or a

zip drive to assist you there are plenty

of usb 3.5 inch floppy drives and zip

drives available online that you can

purchase

you can plug these into any windows

computer via a usb port or a mac

computer depending on the disk format

gets a bit trickier with older carriers

such as the five and a quarter inch

floppy disks and i'd say that most

people wouldn't have access to a working

five and a quarter inch drive

there are professionals who can transfer

the content from these carriers for a

fee so it's worth considering

now that you have all the content that

you wish to keep off those carriers and

onto your managed storage it's time to

do an analysis of your own collection

go back to the guiding questions i

talked about at the beginning and do

your best to answer them

it's best to think of your phone and any

memory card as being physical carriers

because they are

these are carriers that can and will

fail without warning so it is best to

back up

or transfer the content to your managed

storage remember that's your computer

i've heard of so many people losing all

of their precious photos and videos

because they've lost their phone or

their phone has suddenly stopped working

or is damaged

these are photos and videos that they

will never be able to get back so please

teach yourself how to back up your phone

ask the people around you how to do it

if you're unsure

most of the time all you need is a usb

cable and a computer

there are also cloud storage services

like icloud onedrive google drive

that automatically back up the photos

and videos you take to cloud storage

however you will need to do a bit of

research to make sure that this

is set up in the right way for you and

you need to be aware of the risks

involved in using such services

and lastly my

top tips for looking after your digital

content

if you want your digital content to last

you will need to actively manage it you

can't just stick it in a hard drive put

it in the cupboard and

expect it to last

keep your computer organized so i'm

talking about consistent folder and file

names

perhaps ordered by year and project

don't forget to delete what you do not

want to keep

we also need a good backup system

i would recommend that you buy two

external hard drives for backing up your

main computer

one could be connected to the computer

for automatic backups

whilst the other could periodically back

up your computer and be stored at your

work or some other location

you might also want to consider that

convenient cloud storage option as as

well in addition to your backups

you should refresh your backup hard

drives every five years

so just remember

like cds and other physical carriers

your hard drive does fail

so it is good to to buy new ones every

five years

think about the file formats you have in

your collection and the software needed

to access them if you have older file

formats and with little software support

you might want to consider moving the

content to a different file format

This webinar is also available with Chinese, Japanese, Thai and Korean subtitles. To access these subtitles please view in YouTube and select in the Closed Captions menu.

Hi everyone, welcome to the Asian Language Collections Learning webinar.

My name is Bing.

I'm a reference librarian and coordinator of Asian collections in the reader services team here at the National Library.

I'm joined by my colleague, Rika

who is also a reference librarian here.

She has a wealth of experience working with our Asian language collections and in particular the Japanese collection.

We would like to start by acknowledging Australian First Nations peoples.

The First Australians, as the traditional owners and custodians of this land and gives respects to the elders past and present, and through them

to all Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Today, we are going to talk about the Library's amazing Asian language collections.

We will start by giving you an overview of the Asian collections and explain to you what is available and after that we will show you how to find and access them

Today's session is of particular interest to those of you who are interested in published works of Asian countries and the Library's

rich holding of the Asian language publications created by Australian Asian communities here in Australia.

So firstly, let's begin with a brief overview of our Asian language collections.

Until the outbreak of the Second World War, the library took small interest in the documentary heritage of Asian countries. In the 1950s, the importance of understanding its Asian neighbours and Asian studies was gradually recognized.

It was under Sir Harold White, Australia's first National Librarian that systematic collecting of publications from and about Asia began.

During the 1960s and 70s, a number of privately formed collections relating to Asia work wired.

Among them, there were the library of the famous French orientalist, George Coedès, on the history and culture of Indochina, the Braga collection of over 7000 books and conflict on the Portuguese in Asia.

The Beyer collection on the Philippines, which contains about 3000 items and the rich holdings of the London Missionary Society collection in Chinese language, which includes rare and original items of China's Taiping rebellion in the mid 18th century to name just a few.

These formed collections add valuable retrospective holdings to our Asian collections.

On the other hand, we have purchased contemporary research material from and about Asia from publishers and book dealers.

Today, the Library houses the largest resource on Asia in Australia with holdings of over half a million volumes.

The Asian collections emphasize East and Southeast Asia.

Our script language collections include Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai, Lao, Cambodian, and Burmese collections.

We collect books, journals, magazines, government publications, newspapers, maps, pictures, ephemera and many other materials.

We also subscribe to some online databases.

The fact that the Asian collections have only been developed since the 1950s has partly dictated the nature of these collections.

The strength of the collections is in contemporary materials from the 19th century onwards, with emphasis on the social sciences.

The subject of the modern history, politics and government current affairs, society, and culture are well covered.

Our holdings of modern history in Asia cover most of the significant times and events.

If you'd like to learn about Meiji Restoration, the rise of the Chinese communists, the Sino-Japanese War,

the Chinese Cultural Revolution or the impact of the Cold War in Asia;

material to support your interest is extensive.

Our contemporary holdings are as rich.

The collection offers abundant resources to support exploration of topics such as North-South Korean relations, the political movements in Thailand,

Korean pop culture,

The LGBTQ and gender studies in Japan,

Indigenous people in Taiwan,

Economic development,

Government policies,

Social movements and arts in Asian countries.

Then this goes on.

One of the Library's collecting priorities is Australian material.

We hold a significant collection of publications about Australia and by Australian authors published in these Asian countries.

With contemporary material being the main focus, we also have wonderful old and rare items in the collections.

An example is now a beautiful Japanese woodblock print collection.

We have hundreds of the prints published in the 19th and early 20th century in Japan.

Most of them are digitized and made available via Trove.

I'd like to show you this print which is called:

Shinasadame kaika no hana

This was printed in 1879.

The woodblock prints from the late 19th century shows the rapid social changes in Japan.

This may look like a scene from a kabuki play, but it's not.

This print depicts people comparing traditional Japanese goods with those newly introduced after the opening of this country as if they were kabuki actors.

Look at the two men in the middle.

One of them is wearing a traditional Cape.

The other is wearing a Victorian style coat.

Like them, we can see a traditional sandal and a shoe.

A Japanese style umbrella and Western style one

This man is holding new banknotes in one hand and a bag of a Edo era silver coins in the other.

We know from this print that the end of the 19th century was a time of mixing the traditional with new from the West.

The Library's woodblock print collection is an invaluable resource for the study of art as well as social sciences.

The Library not only holds a wonderful collection of material collected from these Asian countries.

We have also been collecting material documenting the lives and activities of Asian communities here in Australia for decades.

The legal deposit requirement under the Copyright Act 1968 has also enabled Library to collect a good collection of published works in Asian languages, such as newspapers, magazines,

community newsletters, reports, yearbooks and a lot more.

Take out the Chinese language newspapers, for example. We hold over 100 Chinese Australian newspapers published across different states and territories in Australia from the earliest ones started in the

1850s to many current titles.

An example of the early Chinese newspaper is this one.

A supplement to Chinese Australian Herald.

This broadsheets was published in 1897 with an illustration of the Diamond Jubilee Charity Carnival which was held in honour of Queen Victoria at the Sydney Agricultural Grounds.

A special feature of that carnival was the Chinese procession. About 600 Chinese participated in this event. They came from all parts of Sydney and suburbs.

Through this picture,

we could imagine the liveliness of this scene.

They wore celestial costumes borrowed from the Chinese community at Bendigo.

At the head of the procession, there was a huge dragon, 150 feet long,

which needed 80 Chinese people to carry.

There were also lion danc,e the Emperor's carriages, the Chinese flags and banners.

These broadsheets vividly documents his first time in the colony of New South Wales

that such a Chinese display had taken place.

We also have many current newspapers such as the Australian Chinese Daily, the Chinese Melbourne Daily and the Australian Chinese Times.

They, all together, provide a great array of information about the individual and collective lives of Chinese people in Australia.

So, no matter if you are a student of Asian studies, migrants from Asia who would like to read books in your languages,

descendant of Asian migrants interested in discovering family history stories, or if you are just curious about Asia;

there's something for you in this collection.

We have talked you through a broad overview of what is in the Asian language collection and some example of the collection highlights.

This takes us to our next point.

How to find and access these materials.

Let's bring up the library homepage:

N - L - A dot G - O - V dot A - U

Before jumping over to our catalogue search, I would suggest you apply for National Library card if you haven't got one.

To get a library card is very simple.

You scroll down a little bit and click the get a library card just below the catalogue search.

Getting a library card is free.

You don't need a library card to search our catalogue, but you will need to log in with your library card to request items or access our subscribed databases from home.

If you can't make it to the Library, you can choose to have the card posted to you.

Let's go back to the home page from here.

This is our catalogue search.

Most of the collections are discoverable by our online catalogue.

You can use this search box to start your search or you can click on this catalogue button on the right to go straight to the catalogue page.

Our catalogue allows you to search using English, Asian scripts and Romanised form.

The searching methods are similar, though, you search by keyword, subject of interest, title, publication or name of author.

The best way is to start with the more general term and then you can refine result in a variety of different ways.

Our example today is Chinese history.

You can start off type in Chinese history or history China here in the search bar.

After clicking the "find" button, you'll be able to see a list of catalogue records relating to the keyword.

On the right hand side of the page there are a few limiters which can be used to narrow search.

As you can see, we have items of different formats.

You can click on the "more" to expand the list.

So our history of China we hold resources in the range of formats including books, microform, journals, pictures, audio and so on.

Other options include eResources - which I will come back to later -

Then author, subject area,

If you click the "more" to extend the subject list, you will see history related subject terms which allowed you to refine your search,

for example by only look at Chinese history in a certain period of time or different aspect of the history.

Then we have series, decades, language of publication, publishers and place of publication.

So, we have got different ways of narrowing down a very broad search.

I'm going to choose "Chinese" here to limit the results to Chinese language publications only.

Here we still have over 30,000 items.

Before we refine the search further,

let's click on the title to have a look at one of the cattle records to give you a sense of how to understand the information in it.

This is a book titled "Bei jiang tong shi - a complete history of China North Borderland."

So you can click on the title to go to the record page. The first line is the Romanised form of the title, the second line contains the Chinese title.

This is a book published in 2003 and it is in Chinese.

You can see the title, author, edition, publisher are described both in Romanised form and the Chinese script.

Scroll down to the bottom.

You can tell that we have a print copy of this book and if requested it will be available in the Main Reading Room of the Library building.

Now let's go back to the search page.

If you are residing some distance from Canberra and would like to read our E books

or view our digitised collections from home, you can use the eResources options here to find online items.

There are two sources of eResources listed here.

We have items included in our subscribed database and NLA digital material which are generally old materials that are digitised and available freely online.

If we go for the subscribed database, leads will bring up a list of ebooks relating to the history of China that we subscribe from other databases.

To access them, you go into the record and use the online links to access them.

While in the Library building, we can access all of the eResources.

If you access the book from home, you will need to log in to use the databases.

We can, of course choose to view NLA digital materials.

So instead of the"subscribed database" we choose "NLA digital material."

The small images on the left of the title also indicates the image has been digitis ed.

We have 322 items

including pictures, books,

maps and manuscripts items.

You can click on the title to go to the catalogue records for more information on the title.

Or you can simply click on the image to view the digitised item.

For example, this is a poster of Mao published in 1970, which was during the Chinese Cultural Revolution period.

It depicts Mao Zedong above a group of soldiers from the Peoples Liberation Army, each of them holding a Little Red Book.

Which is a selection of Mao's sayings. The caption reads "The Chinese People's Liberation Army is the Great School of Mao Zedong Thought."

It is more than 50 years since the poster was created, but it's still so colorful and vivid.

It is a good item recording the history of China at the time

or it could be a wonderful piece to study Chinese art or artists as well.

As we mentioned earlier, you can't only search in English, but also Asian scripts and sit under their Romanised form.

The following sessions would be most relevant to those who know the languages and would like to locate specific items.

For example, I enter this word in the search bar, which means economics in Korean.

This search returns 460 results.

It means that there are 460 records that include this particular Korean wide in their catalogue records such as title, editor and publisher fields.

Again, we can use the limiters on the right hand side to narrow search, or you can use the entries in the catalogue record to bring up similar items.

If you know the title or author name in Asian scripts, this is a good way to search records.

Finally, let's move to search with Romanised form.

This is particularly useful in locating items by their titles and authors in our Chinese and Japanese collections.

For Japanese items, romanization is used to convert the pronunciation of scripts into Roman characters.

Transliteration of what requires correct pronunciation of the words.

The Japanese Romanisation system used at the library is themodified Hepburn system.

To enter our transcript, transliterated such phrase, divide it into "tango" units and "joshi" units which cannot be decomposed any further.

For example, if you are interested in education after the Second World War, you can use the words "sengokyoiku"

If I type it as one word.

No records hit.

However, dividing the world into minimal units.

I have 128 results.

As you see in the record,

The word 'kyouiku" includes a macron. However, you can ignore it when you type

because the catalogue will bring all records that include the word with and without macron.

As Rika said, using Romanisation to search titles and authors in our catalogue is the best way to identify Chinese items.

So, I will explain a little bit more about the Chinese Romanisation.

As the Chinese characters have simplified and traditional forms and our cataloguing rule is to transcribe which whichever form appears

on the book, then describe the title, author and imprinting Romanisation.

Therefore, using the simplified or traditional character to search will only give you parts of the relevant results,

and searching by correctRomanisation form it's more precise and comprehensive.

For Chinese collections, the Romanisation form we use in catalogue records is Pinyin, but we separate the Pinyin of each character with the space.

Except for persons giving names and place names.

For example, if I'm looking for a journal titled "Chinese Art" or "Zhongguo yi shu", I will enter "Zhongguo", which is China.

And since China is a name of a country or place, I connect the two syllabus, Zhong and Guo together, leaving no space in the middle.

And then "yi shu" separately.

And here it is

This is a journal called "Zhongguo yi shu"

If you are looking for books written by an author, for example, Mao Zedong, or about him.

The authorised form of the name Mao Zedong looks like this. Mao, family name, goes first and then you connect the given names, Zedong together.

Yeah, that's all about the Chinese Romanisation.

So much for the search of the catalog.

I'd like to draw your attention to the final part of the session.

Our eResources portal.

We have talked about the Trove's digital collections and subscribed ebooks, which can be found on our catalogue and there are lot more online resources

we are offering via the eResources portal.

Let's go back to the Library homepage by clicking the Library icon on the

top left corner of the page.

You will be able to find the eResources link here.

Just next to the search bar and the Trove portal.

Click on the E resources.

There will be a license agreement detailing the use conditions.

If you are happy with the terms and conditions, click "accept."

The portal works best when you log in first

See this yellow banner on top of the page. Log in using your library card number and your family name.

After logging you can use this search bar to look up resources, but I would suggest go to the browser resources tab.

This is the part where you really get

a sense of what is available.

If you look down the left hand side of this menu, you will notice there is a list of subjects.

We want to look at the Asia Pacific database.

So just click the plus sign next to Asia Pacific and you can then see Asian studies.

Click on it.

The Asian studies related databases will come up in the panel on the right.

You can scroll down to browse.

The databases, used the A-Z alphabet or the search bar to search databases

if you have a name in mind.

Some of the popular databases include China Academic Journals or sometimes referred to as CNKI.

This resource indexes thousands of research level Chinese language journals.

We also subscribe to the Chinese national newspaper, the People's Daily.

Another database which may be of interest is PressReader.

Press reader provides access to over 7000 newspapers, magazines and periodicals in 60 languages from more than 120 countries.

This is the home page of PressReader

You can use the countries and languages option to find the publication of interest.

To find Chinese publications, you select the language and hit "Done".

Here are the titles in Chinese available.

I'm sure you will find some good reads in PressReader .

We have come to the end of our webinar today.

We hope everybody gets some ideas about the Library's

Asian language collections.

We also encourage you to take a look at our getting started page and some other learning videos on our website.

If you need help, you can always turn to our Ask a Librarian service for assistance.

Thanks for watching.

Stuart: Hello, my name is Stuart Baines and I'm  the Assistant Director of Education and  

Public Programs at the National Library of  Australia. Welcome to this discovery video  

in which we will explore the EA Chrome Collection.  A rich and diverse collection full of pictures,  

manuscripts and objects telling some of the  fascinating stories of Australia's aeronautical history

The E.A. Crome Collection documents  the stories of people who navigated Australia's  

skies in the golden era of aviation. In those  early days of flight, without GPS or radar,  

successfully navigating across this wide  country came down to the pilots ability  

to read the land or the skies. The geographic  landmarks and celestial bodies of this continent  

have guided travellers long before the first plane  took to the skies. The first people of Australia  

have trusted the land and sky to point them safely  to their destination for generations and have  

repaid this guidance with caring for the land and  preserving its knowledge for generations to come.   

The National Library of Australia  acknowledges Australia's first peoples,  

the first Australians, as the traditional  owners and custodians of this land,  

and we acknowledge them as the first navigators  of the continent. We pay our respects to their  

elders past and present, and through them to the  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.   

Ernest Alfred Chrome was born in Sydney in  1902. He became fascinated by aviation in 1919  

when he witnessed the arrival of a Vickers Vimy  in Sydney, piloted by Ross and Keith Smith,  

who had just completed the first flight from  England to Australia. From then on, he began  

collecting aviation material. In 1928, Chrome  met Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm.  

His collection is especially rich in material  relating to the career of these two men.   

The library acquired a substantial quantity  of Chrome's collection in 1966, including  

photographs, manuscripts, and objects relating to  aviation. The Library also interviewed Chrome as  

part of its oral history project, in which he  describes his collecting and some interesting  

stories behind some of the objects.

Audio recording of E.A. Crome: Today they are finding-  

by people who have been interested in the air and  collectors. They're finding rare envelopes  

or cards or even pamphlets that have been thrown  out of balloons, aeroplanes, and from this they're  

finding records of people and events that  have been long since forgotten. But now  

they're beginning to find the very important  links that create the story of aviation.   

Stuart: Chrome continued to make donations to  the Library for the rest of his life,  

and after his death in 1987, the Library  received what remained of his collection.   

During his lifetime, Crome also donated around  20,000 items to the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney.  

Along with music, manuscripts and books  relating to his other lifelong interest:  

violin making. The collection held by the Library  spans a range of formats including 250 books,  

magazines and pamphlets. Flight log books  including those of the crew of the first  

transatlantic flight in 1928. There are 1145  photographs depicting early aviators and planes.   

Many of Australia's early aeronauts were  pilots during the First World War. While the  

collection does hold images and objects relating  to military pilots and aircraft, it is primarily  

focused on civil aviation, with the bulk of the  collection consisting of around 30,000, yes,  

30,000 aero philatelic items. For those of you  who don't work in a library, that's items relating  

to airmail and other civilian flight related  ephemera including menus, photos, and leaflets.   

One of the great things about the National Library  is that our objects and collections are free  

and available for anyone to come in and  view them. All you need is a library card.   

One of the other great things about the National  Library is that we understand not everyone lives  

in Canberra or can get here easily. To that end,  we have digitised a huge amount of our collection  

and have made it freely available online. You  can access these collections wherever you are.  

You don't even need a library card.  The Chrome Collection is no exception.  

With almost two and a half  thousand digitised items.   

I'm going to show you how to find out more about  this collection, how to located it in the catalogue and  

along the way look at some of the standout moments  from Australia's aviation history. Locating  

the collection is a simple matter of finding  your way to the National Library's website.   

Opening our catalogue and doing a search for EA  Crome . If you're looking to browse the whole  

collection, you can work your way through the 127  pages of results. However, if you're only looking  

to see what's available digitally, you can use  the narrow search buttons. Along the side here  

and limit to all online. It doesn't  narrow down the pages too much,  

but you can at least know all results are  viewable online. Now, if you're looking for  

photographic material, you can scroll through the  pages, but I would suggest using this result.   

This is the catalogue entry for  the formed photographic collection.  

Clicking through you can get an overview of  what you might find inside using the link down  

the bottom. You can open the trove viewer  and click browse this collection. You now  

have all digitised photos at your fingertips to  scroll through with a short description of each.   

Once you find one you think you might be  interested in, just click the thumbnail and you'll

get the full image in high definition. I like  to look at this one here, so I'll click through,  

and we can now see the gorgeous de Havilland Comet  Grosvenor House , the winner of the MacRobertson  

Air Race in 1934. The air race took place as  part of the Melbourne Centenary celebrations  

organised by the Lord Mayor of Melbourne and  with the prize of 15,000 teams vied to fly  

from RAF Mildenhall in East Anglia to Flemington  Racecourse in Melbourne in the fastest time possible.   

Grosvenor House took out the trophy  with a flight time of 71 hours.  

The 2nd place winner. A team from the  Netherlands flying in Douglas DC-2 "Uiver" 

made the trip in 90 hours and 13 minutes.  Despite an unexpected stormy stop in Albury.   

You can read more about that side adventure on  our Digital Classroom. The links below in the  

description. The pilots of Grosvenor House  Flight Lieutenant Charles William Anderson  

Scott and captain Tom Campbell Black not only took  home the prize money, but a spectacular trophy.  

The Chrome Collection holds one of the  few photographic records of this trophy.   

The trophy is reported to have been melted down  to aid the Red Cross Fund during the war in 1941.  

Using the Trove newspaper archives, you can see  one of the other existing photos of the trophy  

in an article reporting  the plans to melt it down.   

There are too many photographs in the collection  for me to go through all of them today,  

but if aviation is your thing, there should  be enough here to keep you busy for days.   

The current collection is rich in manuscript  material. This is defined as items,  

usually handwritten that are not published or made  commercially available. Items, including personal  

correspondence, play scripts and the like.   The main groups of manuscripts in the Chrome  

collection consists of papers and memorabilia  are some of Australia's early aviators. Records  

of Australian National Airways, Imperial Airways  Limited and other airlines and aircraft logbooks  

between 1925 and 1940. It is important to  note here that of the manuscript collection  

only the logbooks and the arrow philately items  are digitised. Among the most important items,  

digitised and notes exchanged between the crew  of the first Trans Pacific flight in 1928,  

the log kept by Charles Ulm on the flight of the  Southern Cross from Richmond to Wyndham in 1929,  

ending with a forced landing at Coffee Royal  and the log of the Southern Cross on the 1st  

East West crossing of the Atlantic Ocean in 1930.   The digitalization of the aircraft and engine logs  

were made possible through the generous financial  support of Dick and Pip Smith Foundation.   

To find these notes and all the other  manuscript material in the collection,  

we can once again search for EA Crome in our  catalogue and use the narrow search format  

function to limit to manuscripts. And here the  first result, we can see the papers of Ernest  

and Vertie Chrome. Clicking through this record  will open up a finding aid. These guides make  

it easier to navigate through large collections.  This finding aid was published with the assistance  

of the EA Chrome Trust. Here you can see we  have several logbooks listed in series, one  

each one of these is a whole logbook with  many pages in them. You can scroll down  

here or in the contest list here to find  what interests you and then click through  

I mentioned in the Southern Cross on the 1st  Trans Pacific flight. Just a moment ago.   

Here are a collection of notes passed between the  cockpit and the cabin during the nine-day flight.   

Clicking the icon will bring up images of the  pages. Then you can click on an image to see  

it up close. Here we can see the optimism of the  crew as they neared the end of their journey.   

He can use the next or previous links  along the top to scroll sequentially  

or use the browser. This collection link along the  top to jump back to the overview and browse. You  

can follow the breadcrumbs to get back to the  guide and continue browse. This finding aid  

also includes the aero-philately collection  full of airmail paraphernalia, postcards,  

and stamps. This first album here also has a  few early photos in it, including this image  

of W.A. Heart, the first person to qualify for  an aviator's certificate in Australia in 1911.   

And on the next page, two photos of Harry Houdini.  Yes, they're going over Niagara Falls in a barrel  

illusionist Houdini, who made three flights in  Australia in 1910 at Diggers Rest near Melbourne  

in a single engine Voisin biplane. The rest of the  album is more in line with philately collecting  

postcards, souvenir material autographs,  flight covers. It does also have objects  

connected to one of the most unusual eras in  world aviation history: the age of the airship.   

From 1908 to 1939, Zeppelins or German airships  carried passengers mail and cargo around the  

world. The post marks and stamps were highly  prized by collectors and revenue from postage  

financed much of the operating costs.   This water-resistant mail pouch from   

LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin , which would be thrown from the  moving airship close to the receiving post office,  

has instructions in four languages for the finder:  

"Please deliver the contents of this post  bag immediately to the next post office."  

Attached to the pouch, the long, striped cloth  tail to increase its visibility. The collection  

also includes the parachute used to drop mailbags  from the infamous LZ 129 Hindenburg . Chrome made  

no distinction between collecting items that a  library might archive, or a museum might archive  

as a quirk of this collecting, the Library has  a number of objects and artefacts relating to  

some of Australia's early aviation exploits,  including this a suitcase. It might make sense  

that a suitcase is related to air travel, but  this one isn't famous for carrying luggage.   

The inscription carved on the front tells you all  you need to know about these objects history:   

Bag used to transfer oil in Southern Cross  Jubilee Airmail Tasman Flight 15 May 1935. C Kingsford Smith

PG. Taylor, John SW Stannage. In 1935 Charles Kingsford Smith was again in  

the news for his exploits; flying a now ageing Southern Cross on a promotional trans-Tasman mail  

run. Eight hundred kilometres into the journey a chunk of metal broke off from the centre engine  

and shattered the starboard propeller.The crew  turned back to Australia; a flight of 10 hours  

into a headwind. The plane began to lose altitude and cargo was jettisoned to lighten the craft, but  

the engine struggled.Two hours into the emergency flight back, the port engine began losing oil.   

Notes passed in the cabin show the crews concern "1220 port engine giving out. May  

not last an hour." In a now famous act  of bravery, the Southern Cross co-pilot,  

Bill Taylor, walked out along the starboard wing  to collect the disabled engine's oil in a thermos  

which then emptied into the leather suitcase held by John Stannage, the radio operator.   

He walked out along the wing and filled  and emptied the thermos six times  

and then reversed the operation on the portside, filling the haemorrhaging portside engine  

from the contents of the suitcase. The  next note passed among the crew reads  

"1256. sunlight. still in the air. Bill hero.  Climbed out and got oil for dud motor."   

Followed by. "Bill's the world's greatest  hero. He transferred about one gallon of oil,  

hope to see land in about 10 minutes  now. " As it approached the coast,  

the Southern Cross was escorted to Mascot airport  in Sydney, where it landed safely. This would be  her last flight.

What a remarkable story and  the nerve. And what better way to preserve the  

memory of the event than to carve your name into the suitcase that helped save the day.

Ernest Crome acquired the suitcase  and notes for his collection,  

and they were among the first objects  donated to the Library by Crome in 1966.   

Before I leave you to explore the collection for yourself, I do want to mention the legacy  

of E.A. Crome. After his death, Crome left a bequest to the National Library of Australia.  

The EA Crome Trust Fund was to be used to continue  documenting the Australian aviation industry and  

to maintain his collection. The EA Crome Aviation  Project is currently 2368 images strong of the  

modern Australian aviation industry, showing  modern aircraft terminals, maintenance and the  process of

modern air travel. The project also extends  to collecting oral history recordings of people  

who work in the aviation industry. It's worth  noting that these modern recordings unfortunately  

are not available digitally as they are bound by  access restrictions imposed by the interviewee  

but historic recordings of Crome himself talking  about his collection are available online.   

As I've said, this collection is vast. Within it,  it includes just about every type of material the  

Library collects: photographic, material,  paintings, manuscripts, books, magazines,  

audio maps, the list goes on. While it's not possible to show you everything that is online  

in this collection today, I hope I have sparked  your interest in discovering more about it.

If you have further questions about items  within the collection or need help accessing it,  

don't forget you can submit an Ask a Librarian request on our website.

Our reference librarians  can work with you to help you find what you're after.

Thanks for watching.

Hello everyone and welcome to today's webinar on tracing the history of your house. My name

is Ella and I am a reference librarian here at the National Library of Australia.

I'm joined by Sue, who is not only also a reference librarian here at the Library, but

one of our most experienced and knowledgeable colleagues.

The National Library of Australia acknowledges Australia First Nations peoples, the first

Australians, as the traditional owners and custodians of this land and gives respect

to the elders past and present, and through them to all Australian Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander people. As Sue well knows, some of the most common

questions we receive throughout ask a librarian service relate to people wanting to find information

about the history of a house. The reasons behind these enquiries vary; there

are those who are generally curious, those who have recently moved into a

new home, and even those who were renovating on an existing property and wanting their

extension to be sympathetic to their houses, original design, the list goes on.

Recently, we even had a question from a person wanting to know more about their house as

they think it might be haunted by previous residents.

And while we can't strictly help with the supernatural, we can help by showing you the

different ways to learn more about your house, no matter your motivation.

For those who have already tried family history research, I should warn you that a house history

search maybe almost as convoluted as a lengthy family history search, but there are ways

of finding answers. Australian houses don't go back centuries

and unlike family history, you should be able to get to the starting point.

Today, we'll be covering a number of ways to approach the research of your house as history.

Including the physical house styles, the social history of the area, and finally, how to find

out who might have been living in your house. In Australia, houses from colonial times onward

have followed fashions and showed particular styles over the years. This is generally true

for the whole of Australia, allowing for some regional variations.

Ella has been looking into the architectural trends.

It may seem obvious, but when starting out researching the history of your house, the

first step is to look. Start with what you know and what is right

there in front of you. Walk around your house, inside and out and

spend time studying it. Consider it from different angles. Think about

how it's different spaces interact with each other.

Look at your house is physical characteristics. What type of roof does it have? What shapes

or the windows? What building materials have been used? What kind of paint?

How does the garden interact with the man-made, if at all?

By getting to know your house in this manner, you will undoubtedly begin to uncover clues

about its history. It's also a good way to ease into your research

as the only resource you require for this initial study as time and make sure you take

photographs and notes to they'll be really useful to reference throughout your journey

to becoming a house historian. Once you've done this looking, you can then

go about identifying what style your house is in.

We'll now go through some of the key styles we see in Australian houses and how you can

identify them. It's important to note that we can't cover

every single Australian housing style in today's session. However, this list will be a great

place to start your research and quickly before we begin.

I also want to highlight that the photographs I'll be showing you today are all from the

National Library's collection. Once we've looked through them all, I'll make

sure to explain how you too can go about finding this kind of photographic material for your

own research. All right Sue, so the first house we're going

to be looking at today with this photograph from the Wes Stacey Collection is an example

of a colonial style house. Typical features of a colonial style house

are: symmetrical design, a corrugated iron roof, brick chimney stacks, external shutters,

wrap around verandas and multi-paned sash windows.

And what jumps out at you when we're looking at this photograph here in terms of those

features? Well, this is Entally House from the Wes Stacey Collection

and it's a lovely old house in Tasmania and it obviously has the shuttered

windows and the brick chimney stacks. And in this case they've included the veranda

all the way around the original colonial houses may not have had that veranda because it was

coming back from England, and they didn't necessarily have that, but once they got to

Australia and wanted to keep out the heat, obviously they they wanted to keep out the

heat and the dirt and the mess from outside. Yeah, it's that classic colonial aversion

to the dirt and the sun and yeah, everything Australian.

Yes, yeah. So if your house is in the colonial style,

it was likely to be built in the early to mid 19th century.

So we'll now go into the second house and this is a Victorian style residence, and this

is also from the Wes Stacey Archive and some typical features of the Victorian style house

are: cast iron or lacework, terrace housing a steep pitched roof.

chimney stacks, stained glass, windows and curve verandas.

So what can you see in this photograph? That jumps out at you, this one immediately.

It's the wrought iron, the veranda, the railing around the top.

Not so much the pitched the steep roof on this particular one, but the the thing that

makes it Victorian is the the wrought iron. Yeah and the veranda.

It's so intricate.

So I don't know if we can see if there's any stained glass, but I bet there is

Yeah me too. It's a beautiful photograph from the collection.

Yeah, well, Wes Stacey was an architectural photographer and he... anything that stood out

to him as being typical of that style that you can find quite a lot in that collection.

So if your house is in the Victorian style, it was likely built in the mid to late 19th century

All right, we'll go on to our third house photograph. And here we have an example of a Federation

style house. Some of the features of Federation style house

include: a terra cotta tiled roof. asymmetrical rooflines, gable and motifs,

leadlight windows, high ceilings

red-brown brickwork and a decorative timber veranda.

So what can you see in this photograph here that jumps out as federations so?

Well, the roofline. The roof line is amazing on this one. Its striking, really striking.

This is obviously a high-end federation. Yeah if if if the the house is sort of

like a regional home in a different area

or it didn't have... the person didn't have as much money building it

they would maybe not have as many little finials and gables and so on, but there would be some

decorative element, especially on the roof and also the fretwork around the front of

the the veranda. Yeah, it's beautiful.

Yeah, it's. And we can also see the start into the side

of the image of that decorative timber veranda. And when you look at the full shot of this

image, it's a really wide panning panorama and you can see that they've chosen to build

that veranda overlooking a really beautiful view. And and why wouldn't you?

So if you identify that you're researching a Federation style house, it was likely to have

been built from approximately 1890 to 1920. So next we look at a California bungalow and

this is a photograph taken by Harold Cazneaux. And some of the features of the California bungalow are:

a single story with double or triple low- gabled roof painted with battens. Wide eaves with

exposed rafters, stained glass windows, thick masonry veranda piers or pillars

rough rendered walls, enclosed front porches,

and terracotta shingles or a tiled roof. So what can you see in this appropriately

sepia-toned California bungalow image? So the closed front porch there is is the

obvious pointer to the to the style instead of the veranda like we had in the previous ones.

They've got the enclosed front porch again, keeping out the heat of Australia.

Yeah, with those thick walls as well and we can see to the right of the image as well

that rough rendering, which they often did with horsehair to give it a bit of a bit of

texture and to help it stick And a bit of brickwork for

for more texture at the front there. Yeah.

At the front there yeah that decorative brickwork. Absolutely, and we can actually see the two

inhabitants of this house standing on the porch. If you look very very closely which

is a lovely detail.

So if your house is in the California bungalow style, it was likely built around 1910 to

1930. All right on to the next, and we've got Art

Deco here. So some of the features of an Art Deco house:

are a flat roof, steel frame porthole windows, curved glass,

zigzags and geometric shapes, clean lines and glass bricks. So what can you see in this

photograph? It's very grand, isn't.

That curved wall, you know it looks like it's about to sail off in the sunset. Absolutely.

And the palm tree, they love the palm trees as well.

Yeah, very tropical. Yeah, and we've got that curved glass window

up there as well, yeah? Yeah, and we've got that curved glass window

The little details around this sort of little balcony thing. User that's exactly.

The balcony yeah, that zigzag shape yes and we we do know that you know there is a variation

of the Art Deco house that is called "The Steamliner" so very much fits in with this grand house

here from the Newcastle Morning Herald and Minors Advocate Archive.

So if your house is in the Art Deco style, it was likely built around the 1930s.

All right, we'll move on now to the post War House. A bit of a classic bit nostalgic.

And some of the features of a post-war house are: that it's simple,

has little embellishments, set well back from the street,

has metal casement windows and weatherboard cladding, but also brickwork.

So what can we see in this photograph from the Newcastle Morning Herald and Minors Advocate

Archive? Well, this one is the the brick one, but

weatherboard is, also, as you say, typical and and sort of

the hip roof it has here. This is the post war...

you know they're not going up into the roof and having a lot of high roofs like they did

back in in the Federation time.

Much more pared back. Yeah and yeah they took looked after their gardens

obviously too. Because this is the post-war austerity type, you know they they were coming back

and their houses were important to them, just like

my grandma's house. Yeah, absolutely. And it was when we were

researching for this webinar today. I did say this is sort of the most nostalgic house

style for me because this is, you know this is Nana's house.

Yeah, and you'll hate me for saying this because it is a bit of a unicorn of a situation, but

with this image as well and the title of this image is "Home of Mrs Ramsay, 9 Greenwich Road,

Greenwich Lower North Shore, Sydney 1956." So, this is an image not only of that house

style, but if you happen to live at that address.

You've got it. You have an image of your specific house, and there even is a little Mrs Ramsay

in that lower left corner tending to her garden. Could be... could be I liked.

Could be. Yes, could be.

Yes could. Yeah, I think so.

Yeah. But that that is very unusual.

Very very rare.

Yes yeah yeah. So if your house is in the post-war style

was likely built from 1945 to 1965. All right, we'll move on now to something

very different. We've got our modern style house.

So features of a modern style house include: that they were open plan with built in joinery,

large windows, a connection to the outdoors, and they were made out of a range of materials.

So brick, metal, glass, tiles and timber. So we've got this photograph here, taken by

Frank Hurley, and what are some of the features that jump out at you from this image?

It's immediately modern. Yes, obviously modern with the great

big windows. And not big.... sort of pane windows that they've got

the more interesting little architectural features, and the one on the side

there's sort of set in a little bit, and you can just imagine what it must be furnished

like inside. Beautiful.

My favorite style of house. I'm not ashamed to admit and I really love that boxy form

that they've got too. That's mirrored in the actual form of the building

and then the windows as well. There's that lovely repetition.

Great.

So if your house is in the modern style, it was likely built around the 1950s to the 1970s.

And finally! Wouldn't feel right not to give an honourable

mention to a uniquely Australian style of house. We're looking now at a photograph of

a Queenslander. So some of the features of the Queenslander are:

that they're a single detached house with a corrugated iron roof.

Their high set and they have that characteristic veranda which is often wrap around. But as

we can see in this case with this photograph taken by Greg Power. Not always.

So what can we see here, Sue that characterises the Queenslander?

Well, it looks like double story with some of them they may have been open underneath

to keep out the floodwaters, the ants. I'm not a Queenslander,

but I believe that was and to keep the air circulating through, yeah.

Whereas in later times they then could have enclosed it in, but but yeah, they're beautiful,

aren't they? With the with the veranda and

the columns. Yes, and I think this photograph really encapsulates

the fact that houses change overtime. So while you might have a house that you can identify

as an architectural style, there might be add-ons so that bottom story might not have

been there. But we can still use other features of the

Queenslander to identify this house as a Queenslander. Yeah, I think if you're living in a

Queenslander, you probably know. You probably....

you're probably aware ...have some upkeep to to deal.

with. But just in case. So these houses, the

Queenslanders started being built in the mid 19th century.

Thanks Ella. So what are some of the resources

you used to find these houses and how should we go around and go about looking for them

ourselves? There are a range of resources you can access,

both online and in person that can help you learn more about Australian house styles.

You can use these to first identify the style of your house and then delve deeper into understanding

the context in which it was designed and built. Don't worry about writing these links and

titles down, as we'll list them in the description box below this video.

For example, the National Trust has a great online publication that outlines Australian

housing styles, complete with wonderful illustrations of not only the facade of different houses,

but also illustrations to help you identify buildings including doors, windows, fences,

and roofs. So we've got the page up now, Sue. And I'll just show you so this is from the

National Trust and you can see it has these wonderful illustrations of all the different

house styles. And not only that, but also all the architectural

details relevant to each housing style, so doors, windows, fences.

Really helpful for people not only wanting to learn the history of their house, but also

again, if they're doing renovations, trying to keep everything sympathetic with that original design

That Victorian roof!

So beautiful. And the elaborate fireplacewith all the tiling around it.

Yeah, really beautiful, so that's definitely a resource to check out.

And there are also often state and territory specific documents you can find online, such

as this one from the Heritage Council of Victoria, and I've also got that up on the page. It's titled

"What house is that?" This is a wonderful document that outlines

housing styles specific to Victoria, such as the Queen Anne.

Well, there will be in other parts of Australia as well, but that's a a wonderful picture

of what it looks.

Like and I'll Scroll down 'cause I know you have a lovely story about one of these housing

styles. So this guide actually has it. It's incredibly

detailed. So not only does it list all the features, but it includes swatches of the

different paint colors that the houses would have been painted in.

So I'll go down to our post war. Where are we?

Our post-war house here. Yes, it's our "everyone's nan's house"

Yes! Everyone's nan's house. Including mine!

So if you scroll up, you can see that it was a a brick house.

But they were also weatherboard. Oh, actually, is that weatherboard or brick. It could be either,

but but the house I'm thinking of

where we lived it was cement brick and it was this blue colour. It was painted that

pale blue colour and it was exactly that style and you can just see from the picture where the

rooms were the lounge room, the bedrooms and yeah yes.

So nostalgic for you. Yeah, wonderful great.

So it's definitely worth looking at what information is up for offer from your local and state

heritage bodies. And along with these official websites, there

are also of course a wealth of unofficial websites written by architectural loving individuals.

And now I've mentioned online resources. I'm very happy to tell you

to go to the books! I might be a little biased working here at

the Library, but there is a wealth of illustrative and informative books that have been published

on Australian house styles. For example, there are books that give an

overview of numerous housing styles in the one publication, such as this book on Australian

house styles by Maisie Stapleton and Ian Stapleton and I really love the hand colored illustrations

in this book. It's a personal favorite of mine.

There are also authors who have chosen to focus on one particular style or time period.

Those that focus more on interiors and feature beautiful photographs, and even those that

are more text heavy and details based. And while talking about books, I should also

mention there are also publications dedicated to teaching readers how to become house historians

more broadly, such as this one by the National Trust.

These are very useful in providing clear steps to go about undertaking your research.

These books are all from the National Library Collection, though you'll certainly be able

to find similar publications in a library near you.

But if you are indeed planning to visit the Llibrary, and we welcome you to visit and look

at this material yourself, I suggest you take a look at our recent getting started webinar,

which also features Sue! You promised to teach us a bit about how to

find these images for ourselves. Yeah great, I sure did. So, as you know, the

National Library's picture collection is both large and diverse.

Specific to house imagery, we even have several names collections that may be of interest

to researchers. These include the Wes Stacey Archive architectural

photographs and the Harold Cazneaux collection. To show you how to look for house photographs

for yourself, I'll jump into our catalog. I'll bring up the catalog page here.

All right, so the first step is to limit your search to picture so we can see this ad limits

bar here. We're going to go down and select picture.

All right, I'm now going to type in my search terms. I'm going to do a simple subject search.

And I like to start broader so that I get a better understanding of exactly what is

in the collection. Even if you get a lot of results, you can

then filter down from there, so start broad to make sure you capture everything.

So we can see I've searching for Victorian house and I've selected the limit of picture.

Now I'm going to click find. Great so you can see I've got a long list

of results here. To find images that I can freely access and

view online from home, I'm now going to go to this narrow search bar to the right of

the page. And select all online.

So that'll give me a list of results that has images that I can access from home.

So I'm going to click on to one of the records clicking the title.

"Victorian style house with picket fence, Evandale TAS by Wes Stacey "from that Wes Stacey collection

that we've drawn upon so much today. So from here say if you're wanting to download

this picture for your own research purposes, all you have to do is click on the picture.

That'll take you through to its trove record. And then to the left of this page there's

this little page icon with a downward pointing arrow, which is the download button, and you

can click that and follow the prompts to download it.

So I'll go back into the catalogue record and something else I wanted to highlight

was the way in which from individual catalogue records, you can then find other relevant

material for your research. So say you're specifically interested in the Wes Stace y

Collection. You can click on this link here that says Wes Stacey next to the author

and, if you click on it, it will bring up all of

the results of images taken by Wes Stacey and I know you mentioned the Wes Stacey photographs

not just homes but buildings as well

Yeah, buildings, stately homes, barns and

shearing sheds.

Yeah, anything he thought was of aesthetic value. Yeah, amazing and something else you

can do from the catalogue record and I'll go back into that individual record now is that

we have something called subject headings here in the catalogue record listed and they're links.

So say you were specifically looking into Evandale TAS. You could click on this first

subject heading link. And it would show you I've just got the one today!

but if there were others relating to evendale, they would all be listed there.

So a really good way to filter down your search, but also broaden it at the same time to make

sure you collect everything in the one search. And that's how you too can go about finding

images of houses in the Library collection to help with your house history research.

All right Sue! Now we have a good idea of how to go about identifying the style of your

house. How can we then delve deeper and learn more about the history of the town it's in?

After looking at the architectural details of your house inside and out, you may have

pinpointed your house style and the general time it would have been built.

Then you can research the history of your suburb or town to find what style of houses

are common or typical for the area. This can point to a particular time when the town experienced

a growth. or an influx of new residents.

You might find out why there was a growth in a certain decade, for example, if it

was related to a new industry in the area, or when a railway station was built.

Perhaps the former owner of your house was employed in this industry. I'll give a couple

of examples of this in a moment, but to start with, try looking for a book or website showing

the history of your town, which will help in this research.

One way to find if there is a published history of your town is to use the

National Library catalogue, type in the name of your town or suburb and

add the word "history". So I'll do that here. I'm going to search for Glebe.

And as I said, I'll add the word "history" . And in this case I want to limit it to books.

To a book and then we'll click on find and we'll get a list of the books about historic

Glebe. There's lots.

Yeah, some of them will be about schools and churches and so on. And as you scroll down you'll see we've got a pictorial

history and the one we're going to look at today here is "Grandeur and Grit, a history

of Glebe" and Max Solling has written quite a

few different histories of Australian areas and I've got it here.

The history of grandeur and grip. The history of bleed and as you can see it's very substantial.

It goes right back to when it was first gazetted and named as a parish and you can see here

Chapter 6 is: "The business of building the suburb" and here we've got. Whoops, that's

OK. We've got pictures of terrace h ouses in in Glebe. So that shows you a

a lot of things that's going on in Glebe and all the historical people associated with

it as well.

Some histories, maybe centenary celebration booklets, which can often give names of council

members and other prominent citizens, as well as advertising for local businesses.

That meal that I've got one here about Gunnedah centenary and these books also may have photographs

showing buildings and streets then and now, such as this one.

Here we've got the Main St in Gunnedah as it was then and as it was when the book was published.

So Sue, can you expand on some of the reasons why it might be helpful to know more about

your town or suburb more broadly? Yes, one of the books we have

here is a history of Georgetown, which is in northern Tasmania.

It's said to be the third oldest European settlement named in 1811, so you might expect

there would be a lot of colonial style. and Victorian style houses. And there are

a few notable colonial examples. But the main settlement in northern Tasmania was moved

downriver to Launceston, I believe due to a lack of fresh water.

So Georgetown only has a few old colonial buildings, some cottages, churches and hotels.

As we can see on the picture we have on the screen.

There are no elaborate Victorian or federation examples. There was a period of little activity,

so while Georgetown has a long history for many years it only had a very small population.

It was used during the summer as a holiday destination and there were some larger holiday

houses built by the well to do, but for many years it was mainly a coastal town.

Low Head, just north of the town, had a pilot station and a lighthouse. This was

an important part of Australia's maritime history, but as I say there was not a large

permanent population. The book on the history of Georgetown,

although published in 1980, does not cover the later population boost in the mid

20th century, but we can confirm the main points with newspaper reports now on Trove

and other sources. In the 1950s, the Commonwealth and state governments

pushed to get industry and jobs to Tasmania. A major project was developing hydroelectricity

as they did in the Snowy Mountains, which made it more viable for large manufacturing

companies to use Tasmania as as a base and here you can see Tarraleah in 1959 where a hydro

electric company was busy And what a wonderful photograph with

that worker in the lower left hand corner working away.

And this, combined with the deepwater harbour in nearby Bell Bay, nearby to Georgetown.

Was more attractive to industry... was made more

Georgetown more attractive to industry and in this case it was for an aluminium company

then known as Comalco. All this meant that in the 1950s and 60s there

was a large influx of people and they would need to find somewhere to live.

In Tasmania, there was a Housing Commission which took a lot of took on a lot of building

work. As well as this, there were some workers who purchased

blocks of land made available at very reasonable prices to owner builders.

And we've got a

photograph of those workers. Yes, that's from the Mercury that post-war style.

And with the bulldozer out front. So in Georgetown, many houses fit the post war, austerity style

and the residents would have been factory workers.

Factory managers and executive staff actually

lived a bit closer to the water with nice views and a bit more stylishly.

This image from the Hobart Mercury is from

an article type entitled "Georgetown Grows Up" featuring pictures of the town in 1953.

As the population rose from 350 to nearly 2000 in three years.

That's incredible. An incredible jump. Exactly, yeah, in other towns there may have

been different reasons for an influx of new residents.

If you live in a former gold mining town, you might find that there are a lot of houses

from that built in that boom time. In country areas, farming and other industries

may have ensured a relatively constant population for many years, perhaps with a boost in population

when railway station was built in the town. Here we're looking at Yass, a town in

New South Wales. Gazetted in 1837 but with buildings in the

Main Street that looked much older than Georgetown's mid-century buildings.

Yass, has a long agricultural history well known for the production of merino wool. It

also had a number of flour mills. The Yass railway junction was connected with

yes in 1892, so a house in Yass could have a much longer history than one in the earlier

established Georgetown. Wow, it really is valuable to learn that broader

town history for context. So then how do we go about learning about

the individuals who lived in a specific house?

Well, now we'll get down to the nitty gritty

part of searching the records. We have a handy guide here at the library and I'll jump straight

to our FAQ: "How do I find the history of my house?"

You'll notice here that we have listed resources from the different states and territories.

This is because like birth, death and marriage registries, title deeds for buildings are

the responsibility for each state. Here we have given links to research guides,

for example from state libraries and state archives. You can find extra help for each

state in these. As well as links to the land registries or

title offices. As an example, I'll use the guide here to

the State Records Authority of New South Wales and I'll just open that link and go here to

the House and Property guide from the State Records Office.

You can see in their table of contents the different things that they can give you, uh,

including Department of the Valuer General they used to

value when, when there was a deceased estate they would go in and value or the the.

All the objects within the House would be amazing.

All the objects wow. All objects wow.

You can learn a bit about that from their webinar here that they've got there.

Right? The one we might be interested here is records

relating to occupants. Because you're asking about how do we find who lived there? Yeah,

and it will depend on...

I've just clicked on that. On when our house was built in what date you're looking

at, so the earlier ones are going to be census musters and guides.

You might be able to use electoral rolls. Sands Directory is a street directory, and

we'll talk about those later, and you can see also, there's the Land Registry services,

which will give you the the title holders and the

the leaseholders over the years this is not held by libraries or archives. This this is

like the the births, deaths and marriages. This is for title records and you will

Yeah, great, it's wonderful. Have to pay for.

So it's each state or territory that's responsible for those, rather than a cultural institution.

Each step, yeah. Exactly, and so if we go back to our guide

here we can choose one of those, and I'm going to choose the one in WA which is called Landgate

So I'll open that one up and show you some

examples from the deeds that you can get there so he will look under for buyers, sellers

and owners.

Order a title or survey. Yeah, and then we got click down here again

and then you can see historical records. This tells you what you can expect from historical

records. For example, you can find out when the property

when the block came into being. If a mortgage was associated with the title, and that would

indicate perhaps if there was building on the land or improvement.

And and it will give you the names of the people who owned that piece of land

throughout time, and the when it changed hands.

And that's kind of.

Of like that golden nugget for your house history researcher, isn't it?

Exactly, yeah, so they do have some samples here so I can show you a sample of a certificate

of title. And here we have when it loads up, we've got

this Patrick McGovern was a....

had this piece of land in the Cockburn Sound location and it was a huge

parcel of land, and if you scroll down, I think it tells you here how many acres it

was on... twelve chains, forty-five links and etc etc. Because

this is a a very old historic it, it was first done in 1883 and you can see where it was

located here. Its historic yeah, what a wonderful document.

Its yeah what a wonderful document. They usually have the old ones. Had these

little maps on them and here it's got the transfer of land

in 1902, so it will tell you that as well. 1902!

And I love that in this case this example as well when it was transferred to Edward William.

a Fremantle gentleman and it was transferred at 3:00 PM on the 9th of May,

yeah. On the 9th day of May.

Yeah, it's very detailed.

It's very detailed.

You need to know these things.

You may have noticed if I just close this one now scrolling down the page a bit and

I mentioned it earlier that there is a cost involved.

So depending on the state you're you're living in, there might be different costs, and in

fact in the New South Wales Land Titles Registry Office, they will

direct you to a broker, they don't do the searches themselves. You need to go to a broker

and they've got a list of people that can help you with that on their website.

Oh wow.

Right?

Right, and also if it looks like if your house has been extended or the land divided at some

point, you can apply to your local council for that type of record too. They'll have records

of planning permission and the people who applied for the Planning Commission along

with the building information like if they had to add extra sewerage lines or something

like that. But there will be a fee from that for that

Council search as well. And say I wasn't in the position to spend

money doing this kind of research. What are some of the other resources I could access

that are freely available.

Well, let's look at a few different options. So directories, maps and newspapers, so I'll

just close these windows and go back to our

catalogue is what I want. And start with post office directories. So

post office directories were produced in all states. Their were fore-runners to telephone

directories as well as a basic street directory. If you live in a city or in a suburb, you

should be able to search a post office directory to help you find the homeowner in a certain

year. Some issues do cover country areas, but these

are not as detailed as the city directories. Your state library will have directories,

just search for post office directory in their catalogue.

There are few different publishers some are available online, others through state library

catalog or other websites such as the City of Sydney Archives which has the Sands directories

online in the National Library collection, we can use an example from the Wise's NSW

Post Office directory. So I'm going to search for that now.

Why is it whoops? I better do it correctly. Wise's

New South Wales... Directory, you could just search for post

office directory. You would eventually come up with it.

But you know a specific title. In this case, yes.

Yeah, yeah, there are different publishers and Wise's was one of them. So we... look...there's

obviously different ones here, but we'll look at the first one and we can just click straight

on the image to go to the

online version. Because it's been digitised

It has been digitised. You can then click on browse this collection, but there

is no quick search. It's not like a newspaper search. You will have to click on it and search

like a book. So if we're going to choose.

1911 and the street, we're going to look for is Albion Street in Annandale.

Wonderful lucky if you're a viewer today and. Wonderful lucky if you're a viewer today.

And you live in Albion Street, so it's a row of terraced houses between Nelson St and Susan

St, and there's the map on the screen there. Living on that street.

Living on that. To show you where it.

Is great, so you've got that identified. The house that we're gonna be look.

Yes, now as I say in this case you can't just search it, so you're going to have to look

for the street index, and there's a lot of preamble in the directories with advertising

and so on. So we're going to look for the street directory.

Street index which is. This one.

Great I think. If I can get it up on the screen, we can see

the street index and if we scroll down a little bit, we're looking for Albion Street.

There we go. And Albion Street is here. Albion Street,

Annandale. It's on page 105. So then you just have to scroll down to.

Page 105 this is where you flex those house historian muscle and.

Yes, you just have to be patient. There we go, there's page 105 and you can

see Annandale is here and tells you where all the council chambers are.

And we're looking for the for the street, the part of the street of Albion Street which

is in between Nelson St and Susan St. OK, and it's on the left hand side, yeah?

So useful to know again, that context of the suburb.

Yeah, yeah, that's right. So we've got Nelson St here we've got Susan St here and we've

got number 18 is Victor J Midson lived there in 1911. The reason you do need to it is helpful

to know where the streets are is because

not all directories will have the the house number, especially the the outer suburbs and

the and the older ones. They won't necessarily have a number, so you're

going to have to count up the number of blocks in between the streets to find out where your

house was.

Then you can go back to the... your family history

understanding and search for Victor Midson. Or you could even go back to the catalogue and

see if there's a map of the area. And see if we can find a map of.

Annandale, now I've lost the catalogue.

So you're just opening up the catalogue again. The catalog let's go back to the catalogue.

There we go, we go back to the catalogue. Let's look for Annandale.

And this time we're going to limit it to maps only.

And there's maps. And here they all are the maps of Annandale.

So many of these have been digitised too. There have been a lot have been digitised

as well, and in this case we're going to look at a plan of North Annandale.

And if we scroll, how do we are we have to, oh, we can scroll in. Yeah, the maps are very

actually they're very...tight? I don't know. They're very dense with information, there's a lot of data on this.

And you can scroll in really well so you can see here we've got Nelson St here.

Very dense with information. There's a lot of data on this, yes.

Susan St here. Yeah, and that's the place that we would be looking for. Number 18. But

here in this 1890 map, the house is not

built and it's still even part of. It is still the water reserve.

There, so it's more a parcel of land rather than a house.

Yeah, it's a part of it, so the houses built before 1911, but after 1890 so it helps you

to narrow the gap. Yeah, yeah, so you can see when it was was built.

Yeah, absolutely, that's a much smaller spans of time.

So it really is indeed useful to look for maps of your area then Sue.

Then so yes, it can be, especially if there's been changing numbering of the street, which

can happen. For example, going back to Georgetown in Tasmania

for a moment, I can tell you that the house numbers for Goulburn St changed at some point

between 1968 and 1972. In 1968. The electoral roll shows it shows a family

at number 89, while in 1972 they are at number. 5, not because they moved, but

because the street numbering was reversed when the road was extended to the north and

they needed. More numbers that could be so confusing

when you're undertaking your house history research.

Exactly. The local council or state archives may have historical information about this.

So back to Yass, we can find an example of strett changes using an early map, so this is

the current map and we're looking for 17 Lead St which is on the corner of Lead St and Plunkett St.

And you've got that pinpointed here on this map. Yeah, wonderful.

Yep, so for looking for a map of Yass, I can look for a map and I happen to know there's

one dated 1936. And I've limited it to maps still.

And I can click on that one. And here's the map of the town of Yass.

Again, with so much detail, so much detail. Yes, but you can scroll in, so

that's not a problem. Yeah, and we're looking for lead street if you remember which is.

Here Yep, so Lead St goes up here to Prichett Street or Richard St?

Prichett Street. And then it stops and then it changes to Bourke St.

This is 1936. Now our current map says that

Lead St goes all the way up to Plunkett St. Well, this is our house on the corner here

on Franklin Street, but something's changed. It had changed from Bourke St to Lead Street

at some point and you can also see while we're on the map that this block that we're looking

at. Yes, so something changed.

Which is now #17 is huge, so it has been subdivided at some point around the house we're looking

for is a really old. Federation House built in 1910 and right next

door there's a mid-century house. OK, so there's been some change as time? Yeah yeah.

OK, so you know that they've been development over time. Yeah, yes.

So you know that they've been development over time. Yeah, yes.

So we were able to find a Gazette notice to show in 1963.

Uhm, there's Bourke. St has now changed to Lead St in 1963.

It's good to know, and you did mention searching newspapers earlier, and I assume you mean

the wealth of digitized historic newspapers available through Trove. Can we do something

as simple as just plugging in an individual address into Trove?

Well, we can certainly try! OK great, we happen to be in Trove at the moment looking at our

viewer and we are going to look only in newspapers. OK, great.

Will search we're searching for 17 Lead St yes yes. So if I and I'll put quotation marks

around it so we'll get

more concise.... more concise results.

Exactly. 17 Lead St. Yass

And we're searching only in newspapers. And we get nothing. That's disappointing.

However, you can keep trying. Don't give up on your first try.

So we're going to make this whoops 17 Lead St.

So just the St rather than full word "street" Just the St this time and we've got a couple

of family notices here and these come from the Canberra Times which are a little bit

later than some of the other newspapers and you can see here.

Oh wow. We've got Philip Howard of 17 year lead St

that's his funeral. Actually if you click into it, his name was Philip Herbert.

Howard, actually is that...Howard. There it is Phillip Herbert Howard, 17 Lead

street OK, but we know that 17 Lead st used to be Bourke St.

So we have another option to search for. So we but keep that name in mind.

Let's look for 17 Bourke St. And again we'll just go in.

We're going to put the whole. Thing this time OK.

And see what we come up with. And we've got here.

Some more results. Again, we've got the 17 Bourke St, Yass

And there's Mr. Herbert Philip Howard from 17 Bourke St yes. So he he hasn't changed.

Yeah, and this. So he hadn't changed house. His house has

just changed street name News. Hadn't changed house. His house has just changed

street name News. This confirms that it was wasn't the number

that changed, it was the street of the change, and it looks like he was appointed as a justice

of the peace. Wonderful.

Back in 1950s, 1940s and 1950s, but. It's be aware though we have other options

for searching in Trove. If your house has

a name. See if your house has a plaque on the side of the door that has a name on

it, yeah? We can search for the name of the house.

However, be aware that not all houses were given a name. Don't expect to find a name

for your house in a title search through the title office because the name

is not officially recorded, a family might give a house name in the same way as they

would name a pet, and it would just change with a different family.

The house in yes did have a name. It was called "Hillview". When searching for this, you might

need to use a hyphen, or you might not. But anyway, we can look.

For "Hillview", you can try we back on Trove. OK so back on Trove

And we can search instead of searching for 17, we can search for Hillview.

And see what comes up there. And here's a page for little people on Gumnut

Blossom's weekly chat and we've got someone from Hillview Bourke. St Yass, called Pam Kearney,

and we can go in and find out what she's talking about here.

She wants a pen friend.

She would like a pen friend, yes, and and this was the Catholic Freeman's Journal,

and they had these childrens' pages for the they'd right into Gumnut Blossom and ask these

things, yeah?

Get advice and ask questions. And yeah. So without going step by step through all

the details, I can tell you that in 1946 in the Cootamundra Herald, we found

that Pamela Kearney was engaged to Bert Quinn of Young.

And her parents were Mr and Mrs. E.H. Kearney. Then using electoral rolls, another newspaper

and gazettes we found that Mr Edward Hastings Kearney was a post office worker and acting

postmaster in Yass in 1940. We've got an image of the.

Collection here and here's the post office that he would have worked in, taken a

little later. Of course, the Kearneys only stayed at 17 Bourke

St until 1941, when they moved to Sydney, so there is still a lot of detective work

to complete on this particular house. Land title records will go back much earlier and

newspapers can also help with the search.

So this sweet little letter in 1937 started...

has started it off with the family search and there's another result that also another letter

from Pam telling us that she had...now she had a baby brother.

Don't, yes, I think it was in this one and on the second page.

She says in the Little people section if we go under here.

In the Little people section again. There's Hillview Bourke St.

"Since I last wrote to you, I got a little baby brother. His name is Edward Lee."

That is very sweet. Good on Pam for writing into these papers so that her descendants

can look at them themselves too.

Wonderful.

So I think that's just been a quick overview of how you can use.

maps and papers to track down families who live in your house, but it may take some time,

patience and perseverance, but could be an interesting exploration.

Thank you Sue. That was a really great explanation of the nitty gritty research you can undertake

while researching the history of your house. It's it's very easy to see why people get

so caught up in their research. Such a lovely note to end on two with little Pam's letter

announcing her brother. And with that, we've come to the end of our

webinar today. We hope everyone tuning in has learned something during today's session.

Whether you're a lifelong house history buff or new to the world of tracing house histories.

We encourage you to take a look at other Library webinars to enrich your research as well as

our FAQ page on tracing the history of your house, which is linked below.

And if you need any help undertaking your research, you can also always turn to our

Ask a Librarian service for assistance. And don't forget your own state libraries

and archives. Thanks for tuning in.

hello

and welcome to this discovery video

about one of the library's

less well-known collection areas our

recordings of national press club

addresses

my name is aaron meinergen and i'm the

digital education coordinator here

at the national library of australia

our collection of press club addresses

is found within our oral history and

folklore collection

this collection includes a rich and

varied array of recorded stories

folklore and spoken knowledge the

national library of australia

acknowledges australia's first nations

peoples the first australians

as the traditional owners and custodians

of this land

and we acknowledge them as the first

storytellers

of this continent we give our respects

to their elders past

and present and through them to all

australian

aboriginal and torres strait islander

peoples

founded in 1963 as a lunch club for

media covering the goings-on of

government here in canberra

the national press luncheon club as it

was then known

hosted just four speakers at the hotel

canberra in its first year

the club steadily grew in membership and

influence and

in the next year eight speakers

delivered addresses

the club officially changed its name to

the national press club in 1968

and it moved to specially built premises

in barton canberra in 1976.

today the national press club hosts

around 70 formal lunches and speakers a

year

and is something of a mainstay on the

australian political

and media landscape the club attracts

speakers from a wide range of

professions both domestic

and international who speak on matters

political

commercial and cultural

from 1963 to 1996 the national library

of australia was responsible for

recording

and archiving the press club addresses

today our collection holds 907

recordings made during this period

of those recordings 886

are fully digitized and are freely

available to listen to online

this video today aims to show you how to

find and listen

to this incredible series of recordings

like all things in our catalog the best

place to start is our website

nla.gov

or you can type nla into any search

engine and you'll find your way here

because the press club addresses are in

our oral history collection

we need to start by locating all the

audio in our collection

there's several ways to do this in our

webinar

introduction to oral history there's

some instructions on how to use a

catalog search

to find all the audio material but i'm

going to show you another way you can

navigate to the audio

in the collection the way i'm going to

show you today

uses our collections menu which you can

see along the top of the page here

if we hover the mouse over this header

you'll see a drop down menu appear

on the right there are some web pages

giving you a bit of an overview of the

library

including things about our collecting

statistics collection policies

but what we are looking at today are

these categories listed

on the left down the bottom we can see

oral history and folklore collection if

we click that

we'll be taken to the landing page

scrolling to the bottom you can see

there are a few oral history projects

that have been highlighted

but what we're going to use today is

this link just here

once we click through here it'll take us

to the catalog with all search criteria

for oral history applied

so with very little work we have almost

6 000

oral history recordings at our

fingertips

we're after something very specific

today though

the best way to find something in the

catalog that's part of a particular

series

is to use the narrow search function

down the side here

we can scroll down and find our way

through the headings we can see

series here with a number of entries

when browsing generally

you can click more and see everything on

offer

conveniently for us though the series we

want is right here at the top

national press club luncheon addresses

the number here in the gray brackets

indicates how many entries fit that

section

clicking through here we can find all

the entries listed alphabetically by

author in this case the author means the

speaker giving the address

using the sort function you can

customize how you'd like to see the

results

for example if we sort by date oldest to

newest

we can see that our earliest press club

recording is prime minister robert

menzies in 1964

but how you want to sort your results is

up to you

so we have 886 results

if you for the time you can browse all

entries using the page links across the

top here

for a comprehensive scan of the series

however if you're after something

specific or just want the most efficient

way to find something

again using the narrow search function

is the way to do it

here we have a number of headings and

we'll look at this one here the author

heading

as i mentioned it'll give you the name

of the speaker now you will see that

some results are catalogued as the press

club

as the author but some will be listed

separately by speaker

the narrow search author function is not

exhaustive it will show the top

35 most populated results so people with

only one entry will not be listed

however never fear

if you know there is a recording or you

want to see if there is one

there's a quick way to do this

so for example i know we have a press

club address by bishop desmond tutu

but his name isn't in the list here so

if we use the search function at the top

of the page here and type in the name of

the person

and limit to audio we can see only the

audio results for that person are listed

here

and here are his two press club

addresses right here

you can also do this for other keywords

so let's try

prime minister here you can see we get a

number of results for anyone tagged with

prime minister

so not just australian prime ministers

we have prime ministers

from all across the world the subject

area is another filter that can help you

in your search

the topics of the press club range

widely many are political as you can see

including 33 federal budget addresses

and dresses by prime ministers

deputy prime ministers etc it's not all

politics though

you can see down here there are 10

labeled as actors

if we click through we can see the

results including some very familiar

names

you will also note now that the author

list now only reflects the speakers who

are tagged in the subject area as actors

using the narrow filter fields in

conjunction with each other

will help you get the most out of your

search

it's also worth exploring the subject

tags a little more

to see what else the collection holds in

connection with a speaker or a group

or a subject often a catalog entry will

say if there are photos associated with

the speaker

all you have to do to see is click the

name of the speaker in the subject tab

down the bottom here

and it'll show you what other items the

collection holds

the last filter worth mentioning is the

decades tab which i feel speaks for

itself

it'll only show addresses delivered

within the decade

selected

i encourage you to spend some time

trying out some of these combinations to

explore this series of recordings

i would also say it might very well be

worth heading over to the national press

club website

and having a look at their archive of

speakers you can download a list of all

their past

and future speakers it'll give you a

date

a name and the topic on which was spoken

about

you can then cross check to see if we

hold those recordings

but how do you go about listening to one

of these recordings

once you've actually found it if we look

at the catalog list here

we can see all these blue listen now

tiles

anything with one of these is freely

available to listen to

so let's take a look at one let's have a

look at famous french explorer

scientist photographer and filmmaker

jacques cousteau

you can see the result here and you can

see it has a blue listen now tile

if we click on the tile it will take you

straight through to the player portal

or you can click on the catalog title

and it will give you all the catalog

entry details you can use this link down

the bottom

and it will take you back to the audio

player

in the audio player there are terms and

conditions to read through

if you're happy to accept and abide by

the access conditions click

i accept you'll then see the trove audio

player

the controls up the top are just like

most media players

play stop and volume slider

many of the sessions particularly high

profile names

will have timed summaries these are

basically topic overviews for particular

chunks of the recording

you can skip to a section that interests

you you can click the play button on the

side here and it will jump to that

section

you can also turn syncing the summary on

or off

so if we hit play from the start you'll

see it highlights the first summary

but if we click through the play bar to

the end you can see

the sync summary then jumps to the

relevant section

this is a very useful tool but it's

worth noting again

that not all the press club recordings

will have this function

the national press club address series

with the in the oral history and

folklore collection is a rich resource

with some fascinating insights and

thoughts from some of the biggest names

on the political and cultural landscape

in the latter part of the 20th century

i encourage you to explore this

collection and the wider collection

at your leisure there's definitely

enough there to keep you busy for some

time

thank you for watching

you

ello and welcome to this webinar on getting started with the National Library.

My name is Sue, and

I'm a reference librarian here in the Reader Services Branch.

The aim of today's webinar is to help to explain to you what is available and to give you the knowledge to research and find the resources that you're after.

I hope it will be especially helpful for those of you who might be returning to school or starting University at this time of year.

So my plan is to begin with a brief overview of the National Library and then do a walk through of how to access our collections.

We will have a look at our website at our catalog, and at online facilities such as our

eResources, generally speaking, I will try to provide a particular focus on digital material which is easily available to people everywhere, not just those of you in Canberra.

Now some of this may be familiar to you, but hopefully I cover some new and useful information.

On that note, let's get started.

I'm going to start with some background information on how the Library works, what kinds of collections we have, how we store them, where we store them.

Basically, the systems that inform our processes. Understanding our collections can help you understand why we do things in a certain way.

The Library's role as defined by the National Library Act 1960

is to ensure that documentary resources of national significance relating to Australia and the Australian people

as well as significant non-Australian library materials are collected, preserved

and made accessible.

We refer to that through our mission to Collect,

Connect, and Collaborate.

These principles underpin all the work that we do and all the services we offer, including the webinar that we're doing today.

You find these resources somewhere in our 279 kilometres of shelving, approximately 10 million collection items.

Physical items can refer to books, magazines, newspapers, and journals of all types, but also material on microform or in audio visual format.

pictures, photographs, maps, objects and manuscript material.

We also have digital material.

Our digital collection currently contains

2.14 petabytes of digital storage. A petabyte being 1000 million million bytes.

So you can imagine how large that is. And bear in mind that we are constantly growing our collection.

Our library building in Canberra receives about half a million onsite visitors every year.

Our website, however, received around 1.23 million visitors in 2019-2020,

which shows we're getting more traffic in the online space.

That's one of the major reasons why the focus of today is to highlight our digital collections and what you can access from the comfort of your home.

First of all, we better find the website. Knowing that we have this large collection doesn't give you a sense of the breadth of our collection.

I thought it might be useful to start with a blank search engine page.

All of our material does have the Library’s URL printed on it.

But if you do a Google search for NLA or the National Library of Australia, you'll find it very easily.

The first thing you can do is click on our home page.

And I'll just close that little bit at the top and you'll see what we've got here.

The first thing you'll see is our banner, or we call this a carousel because it goes through the different things that we have available at the moment.

This shows you what our major exhibitions or events are.

Above that you can see this series of links to take you to different parts of the Library, and the different functions that we have. Below the carousel

you can see our catalog search box here. And below that

again, we've got our collections in eResources and Trove and other

options that we’ll come to later.

So in the process of getting to grips with our collection, this very first page of the website is a really good place to start.

This will look a bit different if you're using a phone or a tablet, but the content is all here.

You will find this menu at the top of the page in the main website, and on every page in the main website.

You can always come back to the home page by using the Library logo at the top of every page.

It's a good trick to know if you find yourself lost anywhere on this website.

you just click the logo and start back at the home page.

Now I did say it would give you a rough idea of what we collect.

I won't spend much time on it, but I wanted to draw your attention to this very first option under Collections.

If you hover your mouse over the word Collections, you can see the drop-down menu.

Our Recent acquisition highlights

gives updates every so often.

It's not regular, but it's still a great way to discover some of the more exciting new items we have.

The other collection links give you some more general information about the range of material we cover. So in this case I'll go into Maps.

For example, our collection page on Maps here.

It's only a brief description, of course, but I find that it helps to understand what types of material you might find in our catalogue.

You might be researching your local area, for example, and in your research you might find a map or several maps from different time periods or pictures of the area

showing how your local area has grown and evolved over time. And we've got lots of highlights down here and I can leave you to click on that in your own time.

We can go back to the collection pages at the top and you can see the other types of collection information we have there.

And there are other information such as Building our collections

which includes information on Legal Deposit. I’ll just click through to tell you very quickly about Legal Deposit.

That's worth noting

if any of you are budding authors, because under the

Library Act

every item that is published in Australia or has significant information about Australia is legally required to be deposited with the Library.

So you can find all Australian items in our library collection.

We better go back now to Using the Library, so we've looked a little bit at Collections and now to Using the Library.

Here is the Getting Started section here where you can find the most basic functions to use the Library.

The first thing is getting a library card, may well be one of the most important of these links.

I can confirm that for most of our collection you will need a library card to access it.

Every library system has its own information management system, so you

cannot use your state library, public library or any other library card to use our collection

and the getting library card link is here and it just takes you through to a form where you can apply for the library card.

And it can be sent to you at your residential address

if you live in Australia.

Registration is free and open to everyone living in Australia.

Of course you do not have to register if you only want to browse our collection records, and so we can do that

today. We'll go back to our home page using the logo.

So there's a couple of more facilities I will mention on our Using the Library pages and the first one is the under

Research Tools and Resources.

We have a section for Research Guides and they're here to help you help you find what you're after.

Let's take a look at an example.

I'll just click through and you can see the Research Guides are all listed alphabetically, but you can also limit by topic, filter by topic here, and so we'll choose Literature.

And Australian literature.

And so you can see

everything that's available, not everything that's available that we've put together for you in this subject

areas in for Australian literature in the Library.

The libraries Holdings are vast and can sometimes be intimidating to navigate, so the research guides are here to help you with that.

Scrolling through the guide you can see we've broken it up, and each guide has a menu there.

As you can see, our research guides won't necessarily go right down to individual titles.

But again, like our collections pages, they can help give you a sense of other research paths or interests that you could explore in our collections,

and you can also find some fun examples of other questions. For example, we've got our FAQ's and you can see

the type of things that people have asked and how we've been able to answer them using some of our databases or our library materials.

And it certainly will help you show the type of things that we have in the collections and how to find them.

Before we jump into the catalog, I'd like to touch on our Ask a Librarian service.

We've looked at some of the ways you can use our website to find information about our collections and about how to access them,

and in a minute I'll take you through how to search the catalogue.

But in all of this, it's worth noting that you're always welcome to contact us with questions or concerns

via our Ask a Librarian service.

You can submit an inquiry using this online form.

You can find it here under Ask a Librarian.

The online form is useful so we can send you back links,

detailed instructions, lists of relevant information, and so on.

To submit a question, click on the red Enquire button

and fill in the form.

While you don't need to provide lots of information

it does help to have precise information, research keywords or specific books or journals you've already looked at,

or ones that you want that sort of thing and everything that you've already tried.

It saves us replicating searches that you may have already done.

Our reference staff will respond within seven working days and we can spend up to an hour on each inquiry, including researching and submitting the response.

I will say that we can't undertake extensive research for inquiries.

For example, we can't complete assignments or answer essay questions,

but we can help you locate information within our collection or point you in the right direction to continue your own research.

So now we get to the most interesting part of getting to grips with our collection.

I've talked you through a broad overview of what we collect and how we collect it, and where you find help starting your research.

But in the end it does come down to looking for one particular book, newspaper or whatever.

in our catalogue, so you'll need to go back always to the home page.

This is the very first page of the website. No matter where else you are on the website, go back to the home page to find the catalog

here. You can search directly here

in this search bar, or you can go straight to the catalogue with that link there.

So if you're on the home page

you just simply scroll under the big banner and you can type in your search terms

here.

Type in a title, author name, publisher or keyword to start your research.

I'll show you some of the features you can use to search and refine results in your catalogue.

Now my example today is going to be economics.

And click on search.

And you can see the results list for this simple search term economics.

Each title is listed here at the top and the bottom of the

page there are numbers to go through to the next page, so if you scroll right down to the bottom

you'll see the next page coming up there as well, and we'll go to page two.

And we'll do a quick look at one of the catalogue records to give you a sense of how to understand the information in it.

So if I scroll down here and find a likely looking example, let's try this, Economics a new introduction by Hugh Stretton.

The catalogue gives you a quick snapshot of the item.

Here's the author to start with, so we've got the title here

Economics a new introduction

and the author is written here at the top.

And also there's a link to the authors name.

If you click on that,

you will see other.

publications by the same author, and in this case there's a little biography as well.

This doesn't always happen, but if it's taken in this case by Wikipedia has given us this example, and sometimes it comes from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

And you can see all the other things that the author has written or co-written.

And so that's what you get if you go on the author link. And then the next one you find under here is the description.

So you can see here the description gives you the place of publication, the publisher and the year of publication, so you know that it's a

recent title or a historical title.

In the summary under here, some records will have a summary section or a detailed description.

Not all items have this level of detail.

Some may have more and others have nothing.

It tends to come from the back of the book, or a publishers description that the cataloguers have used.

In this case, we've got economics in the subject area, so we've got the subject areas

here are also clickable and you can go through to find other books with the same subject.

So for example here if you're interested in Economic History 20th Century, you can click on that and you can go through to several other results in the same subject area.

Let's just go back to the record.

At the bottom of the record here you can see the request button.

And this is to request the item to read in our reading rooms.

In this case it's not available online and you collect it from the Main Reading Room.

It will be delivered there to you, but you need to request it using your library card.

If you click on that request button, you'll be prompted to log in with your card number.

I'll just go back, and then after you've put in your card number, you can review your title before you submit the request.

I might just quickly point out the function back in the record under Cite This.

This link generates a permanent link that you can use in the future.

You can save that and go straight back to this title again, and it also gives a full citation in a number of different style guides.

These can be useful for keeping track of titles

and using them in your reference list. Note as well that these style guides are auto generated, so you'll need to keep an eye out for any inconsistencies

and make sure that generated reference adheres to the style you've been asked to use.

We also have another option here, which is the Favorite option,

so Add to Favourites.

If you want to keep a list of books that are useful for your research, you can add it to your favourites.

You do need to be logged in to use this, so again, if you click on that, you'll be prompted to log in with your card.

But it will keep a list and you can sort them and keep them there for as long as you like.

So that's how to read and use a catalogue record. But if we go back to search results here we can see our long list again of all the titles,

and we can show you how to narrow that search a bit to find something you know, rather than looking at these 3,000,000 or whatever we have.

to search through. So if you can see this

default items at the top

you'll notice that the default is All Fields and we haven't added any limits. So in this case if you're only looking for books

with economics in the title, you can choose title there and you can add limits

and for example, you might only want to look at a book and then you can find that and you can narrow down your research quite a bit, your results quite a bit,

and you can see other items that are only books and only with economics in the title.

But if you knew you were looking for something specific, you can just run that in the title search.

OK, so I'm going to show you our search history here and we're going to actually go back to our original search.

So if you keep an eye that you lose your place on what you're searching, you can use the search history to go back to your original search.

In this case, we're back to our search and we're going to narrow it not using these limits at the top, but this narrow the search on the side.

So here you've got all the formats that we've got

here not just books, but microfilm, journal, pictures

audio - audio refers to oral histories, manuscripts and other types.

We also have the eResources, so you can, we'll go back to that later.

You can limit to the subject area that you're looking at in particular, or the decade in which it was published and the language that it's in.

So you've got all ways of narrowing down a very broad search to find exactly what you're looking for.

The most interesting option, particularly for today's webinar, is the eResources one, which is here

on the narrow search page. In this case, digital resources refers to any and all of our digital content.

It's worth noting from the outset that this can be three types of material material that is actually digital,

such as ebooks, that we have collected or have been deposited with us in electronic

format. Or material that we have digitised and is usually freely available, such as old books or newspapers or images.

Material through databases that we subscribe to are the third type.

If you click on 'all online' you will get material from all three sources.

If you click on 'NLA digital material' only

you'll limit the results to digital materials specific to our collection.

That is what we hold as part of our collection and that we have digitised.

I'll have a look at the subscription databases in a little while, but at the moment we're looking at just the NLA digital material and you can see these items here.

In this first example we've got

Economics by Doug McTaggart,

and that's an item that has been deposited with us with the National eDeposit scheme, and it's just like a print book, but it's only been published

electronically, so it's only available online.

This is due to copyright restrictions, and you'll see that it's only available in this in the website -

there's no print version of this.

These are also available through your state libraries.

So if we go back to the results page for the NLA digital material, you can see the third option here.

The economics of an Australian Landbridge that has been published by the Bureau of Transport Economics,

and they've allowed us to digitise it or have it available through the website and if you click on that online version

there, you can see that it will go straight through to the item on the screen.

In a minute.

There it is there. So quite a few of these are available through the website.

It all depends on the type of thing that you're looking for. And

we should now go straight to our subscribed databases, because these are the ones that you can find from home.

So if we just go back to our search history and look at our economics, which is our big search.

Here's an interesting thing for you to find.

If you're in our catalogue

you can go straight to our eResources portal from the search that you have just done.

To continue to search for economics in eResources, just go to this link right at the top of the screen.

You can click on eResources

to find our

subscription databases right here. You will be asked to

accept our terms and conditions first.

And this link will also work best if you're already logged in with your library card in the catalogue.

It will take you to the database portal. The first time in each browsing session that you open this page you will get a terms and conditions popup.

Read it,

consider if you're happy to go ahead and if you are, click accept.

You will then see our current search term economics in the online databases.

These results are journals and articles with default set at showing full text items.

You can continue to browse items on these pages and because they're full text, you'll be able to open up open them as well.

If you're not logged in, you can click up here to log in to see the full text of these items.

You can, however, bypass the catalogue and go straight to the eResources pages. So, first off, I'll use this logo to go to the Home Page

and then scroll to the section under the catalogue link and under the banner at the top and you can see the eResources link here.

If you start on this page, you'll need to log in.

I'll just open up the page.

It won't ask us for the terms and conditions accepted now, because we've already done that once, but you will need to log in with your Library card here first.

If you start on this page and I can do that quickly because I'm in the Library building,

the first step is similar to a catalogue search, but the results are from online databases, not catalogue.

Library collections, so let's start with a search for " chemistry".

Because we like big broad searches.

Search for that.

And you can see all the results we get for "chemistry".

Now, just like on the catalogue page, you can narrow them your searches here because again you've got a lot of results, so you can refine your results on this side

just like before, the default is always full text and you can view the articles in full text by clicking on the links here.

So full text is already checked, but you can deselect this if you're looking only for references or abstracts.

Another option is to limit by date, because you're not sure if you want all those in chemistry so you can limit by the date will choose just...

publications from 2020 to 2021.

And then then you'll only be getting the recent publications.

You can also limit by formats.

For example, you might just want academic journals.

And you can limit by subject as well

within that broad search, so you can choose one of these here.

So I can you can just play around with that and see how you go with it.

But there are other options to search eResources other than a straight keyword search.

So let's just use this title to go back to the eResources page.

A really useful way

to find different resources, especially when you're new to our collection, is in the second tab.

That's this one.

Browse eResources.

This is the part where you really get a sense of what's available.

If you look down the left hand side of this menu... menu, you'll notice there are three symbols.

The first one is the globe, which indicates free resources and the yellow keys are supposed to look like you can

unlock all the license resource is when you're logged in, you need your Library card for that one.

An the on site resources which looks like a little

it's supposed to look like a little library building, and that's those are the resources that are only available in the Library.

The the free resources are available to anyone

and they usually websites run by third parties, but we found them useful and authoritative so we're happy to provide links to them to our readers.

The licensed eResources are the ones that you need your Library card.

I'm repeating myself a bit, but just to make sure.

You know you can get a library card and look at our licensed

resources.

Unfortunately, we can't provide this.

These onsite resource is for people who don't come to the building, it's due to

publishers restrictions, so those are the different access levels.

Beneath these three symbols, you're able to browse by category.

For example, if you wanted to look at law and politics, you can click down and you can see the different subjects we've got under there.

Or if you want to look at arts and humanities, you can see all the different items we've got there, and you can click on any of these.

Click on history and they will come up here in the pane next to it.

You can also search directly up here for some of these.

For example, my one of my favorite ones is your newspapers.

We've overseas newspapers and you can see they all come up here.

So we've got all the different newspapers from around the world, British newspapers and so on.

But if you want to just search directly for one of your newspapers, you can see we've got the New York Times and there it is there,

the New York Times. When you find the item that you want, you click into this link here to take you out of our website,

out of our eResources portal, and although we access is provided by the National Library, it's then taken into the New York Times website.

Each of the databases will have their own help section and will give you options for logging in and saving things in folders. If you want to,

and also notice the websites might have different restrictions, for example this one, the coverage is only from 2008 to three months ago, so you can only get...

you can't get the newspapers for the last three months, but it's all full-text from 2008 up until the last three months.

This opens in a new browser you browser window tab so we can go back to our original eResources

and you can go back again to the home page and you can find the other option in eResources is publications A-Z.

And you can search for journals or books here.

So if you know of a particular journal that you want, you can do your title search here or you can click on any of the alphabet to find the list of titles.

In this case I can search for "nature", if I can spell it, there we go.

And search for that and it will come up to...it...

eventually ,come up to a page with nature and different journals with nature in the title, and in this case we can look at the first one.

You can see full text access from these three databases, so if we click on the first one and you can see what dates it has available, 1997 to 2015.

We click on the first one, then it will open another page with the date range there, beside it.

So if you know that you're looking for an article in this Journal that was published in August 2015,

you can search that way, specially if you've got the issue number, you can check it. That way you can also search within this publication using this link here.

OK, so if we're happy with our eResources...

oh, just one other thing to show you in eResources don't forget there's a help tab here

and if you can't remember what I've told you today or if you need more, there's another little link there for another screencast of how to find eResources.

OK, so...

we get back to our home page again and I really can't talk about digital resources without providing a brief introduction to Trove,

so I'm sure you know by now where you can find the Trove link, because you will have seen it before as I'm scrolling down and you can see Trove here.

Or in fact, your search engine will find it very quickly.

I don't know how familiar you are with Trove, but it's a fantastic freely available online research tool.

It's actually a discovery service, so a whole range of different Australian libraries, archives and other collecting institutions

have contributed their collections to Trove.

It's really helpful to have in one place-

you can search for material that is held across state libraries, heritage libraries, historical societies, university libraries, even the ABC and Parliamentary Library contribute audio collections to Trove.

Trove is great for finding out not only what may be useful to you, but also where you can find it anywhere in Australia.

Let's have a look at a search, so today will search for "Murray River" and I'm searching over all categories and but the only thing I'm...

putting is...

my...

quotation marks around the search terms just to get that phrase at the top of the results list.

And it's unbelievable what you can see, because you'll see many

long pages of everything about the Murray River.

As you can see across here, you've got the different categories, the first one being newspaper and gazettes, which always comes at the top.

But there are different categories which are all listed across the top here and you can scroll down to see the different ones

and then use these links to go into all the results in that format.

I just click through, I think to the Images, Maps and Archives..er... Artefacts format

just to show you that you will see quite a few online and you can see there from different libraries.

So we've got state Library of South Australia,

we've got some from Flickr.

They're contributed by many people all over Australia.

Many will be online but some won't be online so you'll actually have to click through to find them

and the way you find these is to actually click through to the state library an you would view it that way.

Use this link here.

I won't go into more detail about everything Trove to do, but if you need to know more, there's the help pages up here.

Which gives you a lot of information about searching in different categories.

There are also getting started on Trove webinars and that you can find on our web page channel web page or our YouTube channel.

Which brings me back, I think, to our Home Page.

There's no link to NLA on Trove, but we can find it

as I said earlier, very easily.

So we have one...

a few final things on our webpage and one is our social media channels.

The library uses a range of social media, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, SoundCloud.

Find them down here right at the bottom of the page under here, Connect.

I might just mention though that if you do

ask a question on Facebook or Twitter, if it's a research question such as "How do I find a particular item in your library?",

our Facebook,

our social media staff don't answer those questions, they'll ask you to use Ask a Librarian.

So, quite often, it's best to go straight to Ask a Librarian for research questions, but Facebook, Twitter, and all these other things are good for connecting with the Library.

You can also go back up here again to the top to find out other things about what's on at the library.

You can choose this one to see what's on and what you can book to find and what you can see on line.

And the other option is the Learning Program which we're using today.

If I click on Learning Program here and just to the left hand side, you can find Learning Program and Learning Videos

Left hand side sorry is Digital Classroom.

And there are multiple other playlists in the channel, not just L earning Programs.

There are past event recordings,

gallery tours, videos from our Digital Classroom - our online resources for primary and secondary school teachers, and videos from our NLA Fellows presenting their research or free and available 24/7 so it's definitely worth checking out.

And finally, we can have a quick look at blogs which you can find under Stories and blogs are here.

These often delve into the deep end of some of our collections and operations here at the library and give some useful information that might help you with your research.

They are written by staff members, researchers, an occasionally guest authors.

New blogs are added regularly, so keep checking in.

And just so I can find a blog for you, I can show you this.

Search option here and we'll do a quick search for...

Let's do "snake".

And you can see any number of blogs that are about snakes and you can find where people where we've

had questions about snakes or

collection material about snakes and just to show you that because to remind you that we also have this search option

at the top of the page to find anything you need in the Library.

In the Library website as well as catalogue.

That's probably a good place to wrap things up.

I hope that you have found some of the information I've shared useful, or that you think it might be useful in your future studies.

Thank you.

hello welcome to this discovery video my name

is Ben Pratten and I'm the Program Manager Education here at the National

Library of Australia in this video i'll be taking a look at

the Picturesque Atlas of Australasia and showing you how you can explore this

interesting book and how you can find other rare books in our collection

online for free the Picturesque Atlas of Australasia is a set

in three volumes of over 800 engravings depicting Australian

New Zealand and South Pacific landscapes in the late 1800s

the images and scenes depicted in these volumes are those that captivated

european arrivals to this land and who felt driven to capture the

natural world and built world around them

to share with the world however the appreciation and admiration of the

sweeping vistas and natural beauty of this continent has long predated

european artists with their sketchbooks the National Library of Australia

acknowledges Australia's First Nations Peoples

the First Australians as the traditional owners and custodians of this land

and gives respect to the elders past and present and through them to all

Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

peoples published in 42 separate installments

between 1886 and 1889 the Picturesque Atlas of Australasia set out to imagine

our country as it was and is through its text maps and above

all its 800 steel and wood engraved illustrations the atlas enshrined a

settler colonial view of white Australia's history

achievements and prospects which was to have a profound impact on

the subsequent evolution of Australian art

being a catalyst for the Australian impressionist movement

it's one thing for me to tell you about the picturesque atlas while i have a

copy here with me but it's going to be more useful for you

if i show you how you can access this and other fantastic resources online for

free the first step in locating anything in

our collection is to find your way to our web page

and to the catalog a quick google search of nla will get you there

or you can go straight to nla.gov.ou once you're there you can find the

catalog here so if we do a specific search for

Picturesque Atlas of Australasia we'll see the results

here the one we want is at the top you can

see that it's showing as a book and as online if it has a thumbnail here

that usually means it's digitized we can click on the title

and we'll get a catalog entry here it shows more details about the work

including a description and some notes if we scroll down

we can see that there are some options for viewing the work at the bottom

online in the Library and order a copy as this is digitized the online option

is available to us should you wish to view the object in

person at the Library you can click on in the Library you must

have a library card in order to view an item in person

ordering a copy means that you can request for a page

or pages to be copied pending preservation and copyright issues

this is a paid service and you can learn more about copies direct

by following this link today we're looking at how you can

access the Picturesque Atlas from anywhere

so we'll go back to online once you click this link

you can see we're taken away from the NLA catalogue and you're now

in the Trove viewer trove is our discovery service that searches the

catalogs of hundreds of institutions across australia

it's also the platform through which we can view our digitized books

if you click on the browse this collection button at the top here

we'll be taken to the collection screen picture escatlist was published in three

parts all three parts have been digitized here

so select the one you're interested in or just start at the beginning

i'll go with volume one for now we're now taken through to the picture viewer

the digitized atlas is high quality and can be navigated through using buttons

across the top and down the sides you can also move around the pages by

clicking and dragging to focus on the part that you're interested in

the default view is one page at a time you can move through the pages using the

mouse wheel or the arrows along the top here

this view is useful in some instances like when you're looking at a particular

section however if you're interested in general

browsing i like to use the two page spread section to make this book easier

to read in context you can't use the mouse wheel in this view

but you can click on the pages when you want to turn or use the arrow keys on

your keyboard the six dots here will expand the view

to give you the thumbnails of the digitized content so you can skim

quickly to find something interesting or the particular

page you're after some of the landscapes are oriented

sideways on their own page to turn them to be the correct position

use the circular arrow here this will rotate any page 90 degrees

clockwise just keep clicking until you have the

correct orientation note that you have to be in the single

page view to do this it will only affect the page you're on

if you progress to the next page it should be in the correct position

the images are of high enough quality that they can be zoomed using the

magnifying glass here to a considerable depth and the

clarity is not lost for the full immersive

experience you can use the crossed arrows

here to bring the book to full screen this will hide the toolbar down the sign

to get it back just click the arrows again

the timeline bar across the top is another way to navigate the book

you can see these blue arrows along the top of the bar these are essentially

bookmarks they mark chapter positions and also any

significant headings or images they are connected to the contents tag

on the left hand side you can navigate the content links by

clicking on them and the book will navigate

to that page

this is a good segue into the left hand toolbar

each of these icons can give you some more information about the work you're

viewing

the i will give you the work details publishing date

title pages etc the C will give you information about the

copyright status of the work you can contact us using the link here if you

have any questions about copyright 123 is the contents tab we looked at

earlier

the magnifying glass this lets you search the work for keywords

this only works if the book has been ocr'd

which means that the text has been digitized if we do a keyword search you

can see it lists the pages on which the word occurs and you can see

in the timeline up the top the pages are highlighted green

if we click on one it'll jump to that page and we can find the word

highlighted

a is the ocr text for some works this will be accurate

as it has been transcribed and edited for errors

some works though will only be transcribed by a computer and in the

case of old text where the print is hard to read it may not be so accurate

the pen and paper this will give you some information about how to reference

and cite the work you're looking at in a range of different styles

the page with the arrow this is a great feature of trove

everything that's digitised on trove can be downloaded for free books pictures

maps etc here you can see a range of formats

to download in pdf and jpeg will download image files of the page or

range of pages you're viewing if you select text it will download the

ocr transcript text you can set the page ranges using the

sliders here if you really want to you can download

the whole thing as an ebook depending on the work and access

agreements with publishers the images about available for download

may be high definition or standard definition shopping cart

this lets you order a high resolution copy from the library's copies direct

service this is the paid service i mentioned

before in the catalog screen finally the arrows will simply get rid

of this bar altogether and give you more room to view the work that you're

looking at

the picturesque atlas is just one of the many old and rare books the library is

digitized and made available online i'll show you quickly how you're best to

find these so back in our catalog

click the advanced search function

then click find down the bottom and once you're here you can see that we have

about 5 million results using the narrow search function limit

your search to book and then also to nla digital

material

this will highlight only the books that the NLA has digitized

now to dive back into the past under the sort by drop down

select sort by date

this will organize the search by date of publication

so now we can see the library's oldest book

from 1162 is at the top of the list you can click through

the thumbnail and we're now back in the familiar trove viewer

you can now spend some time combing through the list and clicking through to

find anything that interests you use the narrow search functions to get

more specific if you like

here are a few other interesting examples of digitized books i've found

in the catalogue the unlucky voyage of the batavia from 1630

darwin's on the origin of species 1859 this is one of the earliest known

surviving copies of the first edition to arrive in australia

the birds of australia in seven volumes by john gould

1869 aurora australis from 1908 the first

book ever printed in antarctica edited by e h shackleton

and an old favorite first copy of the first edition of blinky build a quaint

little australian from 1933. this is the publisher's presentation

copy and was given to the author dorothy wall

these have been a small sample of the many interesting books freely available

to you through the national library of australia's catalogue

i hope this discovery video has been helpful and gives you some tools to

start your own search through our rare and historical book collection

thanks for watching

M: Hello and welcome to the Introduction to the Oral History Webinar.

My name is Mark Piva, Assistant Director of Technical Acquisitions and Finance.

S: And I'm Dr Shirleene Robinson and I'm the Director of Curatorial and

Collection Research.

M: The National Library of Australia acknowledges Australia's first nations peoples,

the first Australians as traditional owners and custodians of this land and

gives respect to elders past and present and through them all Australian Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander people.

So today we're here and we're going to be talking about the Library's amazing oral

history collection and we're going to do it by talking about four broad areas:

What is oral history?

How do we do oral histories in the Library?

How do we keep the oral histories in the Library and then finally

how do we access them?

It is an amazing collection and we really look forward to sharing

some of the work that we do here.

So first up, Shirleene, I guess one of the big questions with this is what is oral history?

Because there's lots of interview types in the world, what makes oral history so different?

S: Well oral history is about people speaking about things that they have personal

experience of.

At the National Library we use the whole of life interview method

which means although we have quite focused collections sometimes, could be people

talking about things such as polio or the experiences of living through particular

events we like people to talk about their whole life because we don't know the type

of questions that people might be looking to

those interviews to answer later.

The National Library's oral history and folklore collection really is quite

extraordinary, it's a very rich collection.

Today it is over 50,000 hours' worth of recorded hours which is quite special so there

really is something for everyone in that collection.

It dates back to the 1950s which makes it the oldest collection of oral history

recordings and folklore recordings that were conducted in this country and it really

can trace its origins back to two quite remarkable people.

So Hazel De Berg was a truly original woman who has been regarded

as Australia's first oral historian so she started to do interviews with people who were

quite famous writers, it was how she began and those interviews evolved from her

asking writers to read from their books.

While she had these incredible people in front of her, people like Mary Gilmore, she

took that opportunity to ask them questions about their lives and so on.

So she did this for about 30 years which is a really amazing

span of time and probably around 1,300 interviews were conducted by her over this

time period.

The folklore collection, it traces its origins back to a gentleman called John Meredith

who was really keen from the 1950s onwards to capture the vernacular culture of

Australian life so he did a lot of trips where he recorded the voices of people who

could speak to that vernacular culture and music as well.

Today our folklore collection has evolved to include multicultural

collecting, we're very keen to make sure that that multicultural heritage of Australia

is also reflected in the folk collection.

So together you have this really dynamic and alive collection that provides a really

rich insight into Australian culture and life in a way that really complements other

types of collection material.

I think there's something really special about being able to listen to the recorded

voice, it's quite an intimate way of connecting with somebody's story.

The great thing about oral history, I think, is that we have

the voices of very eminent Australians, Prime Ministers and people who were very famous

for their achievements in our collection but there are also the voices of

people who perhaps might not be as well- known and oral history gives them the opportunity

to speak and to have their voices heard.

M: That's amazing.

Are there any particular collections of those ones with the

voices who are not normally heard?

Because that is an amazing way to get the message across because you're right, with

these eminent people, they're normally written about in many other areas but there's

some groups of people in our society which normally would not get the opportunity

to have their voices heard?

S: Yeah, that is a really excellent question and I think there's a number of

collections that come to mind and I think that there might be many people who've

heard of the extraordinarily rich Bringing Them Home oral history collection which

comprises of about 340 interviews with people who either were members of the stolen

generations or who were involved in removing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

children from their family groups.

That's an example of a collection where people speak very directly to a part of Australian

history which is quite difficult history but it

is such valuable and vital history and I think it really does show what the unique and

special nature of oral history is.

M: That's great.

So in terms of that like given that we've got so many things to

collect how do we actually go about collecting oral history here in the Library?

Are there any things that you need to consider

when you're thinking out what do we record next?

S: I think that we always want the collection to reflect what's happening in

Australian society and we want it to be a record that will be really useful to people

in the future in 100 years' time, in 200 years'

time.

So while we today can listen to voices that were recorded in the 1950s and

1960s to answer all sorts of questions we want people in the future to be able to do

the same thing.

So in terms of the oral history program at the National Library we

actively commission our own oral histories each year and we have interviewers

who do interviews all across the country and each year they're building on that extraordinary

collection of over 50,000 hours.

So there's a lot of events that are currently unfolding in Australia that we would like

the collection to document.

In the future certainly there will be collections that will

talk about COVID which is something that we're all living through at the moment just

as we have collections that as I mentioned talk about things like polio, that talk about

what it was like to live through the influenza pandemic that happened in the aftermath

of world war one.

So it's always about thinking about what's happening in society

and making sure that's documented and that it reflects the full diversity of Australian

society as well and perhaps those voices that haven't always been heard.

M: That's amazing that oral history is such an important way to get people to tell

their stories in a much more personal, intimate way.

Given that these oral histories are so personal what are some of the things that

the Library does in order to safeguard how those histories are used going forward?

S: I think that's a really important question because we're really proud to hold

the types of collections that we hold and something that is really important to us all

is making sure that we look after the material

that we collect in a way that accords with the wishes of the people who have been recorded.

So sometimes that might mean that we've conducted oral histories which are not

available during the lifetime of the person who's been recorded because we would

much rather that they feel comfortable sharing their full story and the way that

they want to share it, knowing that it won't be

released without their permission so that's certainly an option available to them.

So we do have an extraordinary collection and

a great proportion of it is available online but there is material that we do have which

we won't make available online until we have that permission from the person who was

recorded.

M: Also in terms of the collections are we just taking in new recordings now or is

there another way of us that we are collecting things as well?

S: Yeah, I think that overall we certainly rely very heavily on our commissioned

original program of oral histories so at least 90% I would say of what we bring in is

originally commissioned material but occasionally there can be material that has been

recorded by someone else, someone who wasn't involved with the Library.

Perhaps in a previous decade it could be material that

was really rare recorded say in the 1960s in

a remote community and if that material exists and it's appropriate potentially for it to

come to the Library and it's of national significance then we will take in that material

which we called formed collections.

So it's a smaller part of what we do but it is a

part of the collection plan of the National Library's oral history program.

We've talked a little bit about how the collection dates back to the 1950s and

obviously when people recorded sounds back then they couldn't do it in the way we

would now with a fully digitised collection.

I think there's something that's really quite amazing about the material that we hold,

all that 50,000 hours is that it is a fully digitised collection and I wonder if you could

talk a little bit about that.

M: Yeah, no, that'd be great.

The Library is very fortunate to be one of the few

institutions in the world to say that we have a fully digitised collection and it's thanks

to the efforts of people going back well over a couple of decades to ensure that the

recordings that were taken in the Library are able to be fully preserved and fully

digitised.

We completed a 15-year preservation plan back in 2018 which means all of

the collection's preserved and we're actually adding to it at the rate of 1,200 hours per

year thanks to the commissioning programs that the Library does.

The way that we go about doing that is through a very amazing setup here.

We have world standard preservation suites that are

able to preserve many different types of formats.

Because we're dealing with unique recordings we're able to go through and

play back lots of magnetic playback recordings so things like reel to reel tape,

cassettes, digital audio tape was a format that was used by journalists in the late '80s,

early '90s and some CD recordings.

Along with all that we're also very capably taking on all these newborn digital types

of recordings which we collect through our 30 field recording kits which are

broadcast-standard as well as our own recording studios so we're actually sitting in

the studio now and so the microphones that you hear are the same microphones that

we use when we're recording people as part of our collection.

We also have fantastic multitrack recording facilities so each year we have a number

of performers coming through contributing to the collection and we're able to make

fantastic recordings using those methods too so it's really cool.

S: I think that's an exciting program and I think one of the great things is that

technology allows us to record as you say everywhere from where we are now at the

National Library in this studio all the way to remote communities, parts of Australia

that can be sometimes quite difficult to get to if you're travelling from major cities

because we do want to make sure that the collection is carrying all those voices and

that we can record anyone wherever they be in Australia and that's a challenge that

we really love, I think.

M: No, definitely, that's really good.

So in terms of that I guess the next thing to

look at is how do we access these recordings so again we are also very fortunate to

have a number of great ways for you to be able to access the collection.

The first way is to just go straight into our catalogue

and if you type in a search term and just limit

the results to audio you'll be presented with a list of all the things that are available

in the oral history collection.

What's even more amazing is that if you see a blue button

there called Listen Online you can click on that and that will take you to our audio

player and the audio player is an amazing thing because it plays audio as you'd expect

but also we sometimes provide timecoded transcripts and summaries which enable

you to do really amazing things like word-searching.

You can also access it through Trove as well.

The cool thing about Trove is that you do have a little bit more functionality in

that you can actually search for certain words within Trove which may not be in the catalogue

record and they'll also come up as a hit which will take you to the interview and

allow you to play it back as well.

That's going to be something I'm going to show you

a little bit more in a sec when I actually show you the screen when I do that.

S: I think there's something that's quite extraordinary about the National

Library's collection of oral history and folklore material, is that it is a fully digitised

collection and I'd like it if you could maybe speak a little bit about why that really

matters and why that's so significant.

M: Oh thanks, Shirleene.

Yeah, digitisation is incredibly important.

The whole thing about audio is that you can't touch

it, you can't see it, you only hear it and it's

really important that especially with some of these carriers, the [Lexi] 12:58 carriers

that we have now, they're impossible to play directly, you can't buy the machines

new anymore and so in order for people to actually listen to them the preservation is

the access, you need to preserve them in order to hear them.

So we regard digital preservation as basically essential in order

to be able to access these things.

Here what we do is we apply international standards in order to transfer the material

and what we do is we have a very highly calibrated system of playback and recording

which means that when we record things they're recorded as what we call warts and

all so when you listen to something it's as if you're listening to the original recording.

We don't do any editing here because we want to keep this as a true document and we

also then apply a few things to it in order to make it in what we call a master file

which contains a few descriptive elements so we embed certain information at the title

but also technical information there and also create a whole set of access copies and

MP3 files.

So when you're accessing them at home you'll be listening to an MP3 file

that was created as part of our preservation process.

But just because we preserve it as a digital file and stored it safely on MS storage

doesn't mean we throw the original away and we're very fortunate to have these

fantastic climate-controlled tape stores where we keep those originals in perpetuity

because we just never know when there may be another opportunity that we could

play them back again with even better quality.

S: Speaking about the oral history and folklore collection is there something that

you have that is a particular favourite?

M: There's a lot to choose from here but I think one of the great things is I think

as a collection the Hazel de Berg collection would have to be one of my favourites

because she was a woman who had so much forethought to be able to record people

talking about their lives that she basically gave birth to oral history in Australia.

We're so lucky to have her original recorder here, this beautiful Novatape recorder

which weighs about two ton and is made out of wood and is so battered yet she was

able to extract every possible bit of sonic information out of that machine which

means that the recordings that she did in the late '50s are amazingly good in terms

of quality.

S: Yet there's people that she recorded where the Library holds the only copy of

their voice which is I think really quite special.

For me from that collection I'm thinking about somebody like May Gibbs who

many of you might know for her beautiful work around Gumnut Babies and to

think that she was recorded very late in life by Hazel de Berg and through Hazel de

Berg's persistence so it is full of I guess gems like that, isn't it?

M: Oh absolutely.

What about your?

What's your favourite?

S: I think that it evolves all the time and I think that's the extraordinary thing

about the collection, that you can dip into this wonderful as I said over 50,000 hours

and discover new things all the time.

But some collections that I've enjoyed or think

are really rich I guess since I've been really exposed to it include things like the

Australian response to AIDS, collection of oral history interviews.

Because that was the first oral history collection in the world

to be conducted at the height of the HIV and AIDS epidemic where it really gave a voice

to people who were quite heavily stigmatised at that time so we have these

really special and unique oral histories as part of that collection.

I tend to really like the unique voices, maybe the voices that are from people that

people may not have heard of so could be a miner from Broken Hill, it could be

somebody who can as I said earlier talk about what it was like to live through the first

world war, second world war, somebody who might have served in Vietnam.

I think that it's the everyday stories that make up

our collection and make it so special and I

think something that I know we both enjoy because we've spoken about this is when

we can reconnect people to the voices of people that they might know or perhaps are

descended from who might be in our collection.

That does happen where we will hold an interview with somebody's grandparent or

even great-grandparent and we can make it available to them and to hear that

joy and their delight in hearing somebody that's very special to them speak in that

very intimate, personal way about their life.

I think that is just one of the great things

about the collection.

M: Absolutely, yeah, we always feel when people give an oral history they're

actually giving a piece of themselves to the collection and you can really hear it so we

really fully encourage you to have a listen to our oral history collection because you'll

hear the emotion, you'll hear the pauses, the hesitations and you're hearing real people

talk about their life stories.

So thank you very much, Shirleene, for your time today

and thank you very much for your time as well so thank you so much for watching

and we hope that you can watch the next section.

M: Hi everyone, it's Mark again and what I'm

going to do is just lead you through how to find the Library's oral history interviews

on the internet.

You can see here we're just at the starting page of a search

engine and we'll just go straight now to the Library's catalogue.

Okay, just bringing up the Library's homepage there and we'll

just scroll down slightly to get to our catalogue.

You can start typing in here or what I'm going to do is just click on the catalogue

button on the right.

Because I'm really interested in finding audio material I'm going

to click on Advanced Search and just scroll down to Add Limits and then click on

Audio, click Find.

So what that's done is now returned a list of all the things in our collection which

are audio and you can see here we've got 22,000

items to choose from and we can sort these in a variety of different ways by their

date, author or title and that's great.

The good thing is that on the right there's also

some really interesting information here that can help us sort by the author which in this case is

the main interviewer so Hazel De Berg's name's mentioned,

John Meredith is there, or by subject area and we can expand these so we've got folk music or politicians,

painters and politicians, bit of a thing about journalists there or by series.

The oral history collection actually has a number of different series associated with

it and so if you happen to find that there's a particular project that you're interested

in you can use the series title to help you find some more information there as well.

What I'm really interested in though is not just looking up what's in our catalogue but

I want to see what I can listen to online because what's amazing about our collection

is although it's over 50,000 hours it's actually more like 55,000 hours, a quarter of it

is actually available online right now for free.

So 13,750 hours is available for you to listen to right now.

The way we're going to find it is if you see down here on

Eresources, if we click on NLA digital material all of a sudden that brings up a whole

bunch of names which have this beautiful blue Listen Online button and from that we

can actually click on any one of these and listen to them straight away and there might

be some people there that you're interested in listening to so if you can straight after

our webinar today feel free to jump on and have a look.

There's one in particular that I'm going to play though because it's a really great

demonstration of the power of our system and what I'm going to do is type in Florey

so Sir Howard Florey was one of the inventors or discoverers of penicillin and we

have what we believe is one of the only existing recordings of his voice in the world.

You can see here that Howard was recorded as part of the Hazel De Berg collection

back on the 5th of April 1967.

There's a big blue button there so what we'll do is click

on that button and that will take us to the Trove audio player.

There's an end user licence agreement which you can read, just

telling you what you can and can't do with the audio and if you're happy with that click

I accept.

Okay so here we are and we've got the screen and there's quite a bit of information to

look at here.

On the left we have some information that's been ported over from the

catalogue record, being the title then a little bit of a summary.

We can also bounce right back to the catalogue record by clicking

on that link as well as some information about the holdings and some things there.

For those of you who've listened to audio online before you've got similar sorts of

buttons that you might have seen, a bit of a play button, stop button, volume control

and there's nothing to stop us now, we can just press play and just start listening to it.

"This is Howard Walter Florey and I was born in Adelaide at the turn of the century

or just before.

I've been asked to say something about my young days that I look back

on with great pleasure".

M: Oh that's good, see?

There again just an example of the amazing quality that

we can get from something that's now over 50 years old.

So we can just press play and just listen to it, similar to a podcast

or anything like that so it's a great way to

listen to some fantastic stories.

But you might have also seen here we've got two sections, being Transcript and

Summary.

With the Transcript this is actually a verbatim transcript of what Howard

says so if you like you can actually skim through and see what he's said and so if you

do find something very interesting so for example there he talks about his first interest

was chemistry, we can actually go straight to that point by clicking on the play button, here.

H: "The first interest was chemistry, I was not very good at mathematics, no good at all".

M: Yes, I think we can all relate to that.

So you can do that or similarly one interesting way to also analyse a recording

is to use the online summary if it's available.

Down here we've had someone go through and carefully listen to Howard's

interview and pick up key words, themes which is really amazing because sometimes

this enables you to look at recording in a very different way.

It means that you can actually - because there'll be key words or

phrases which may not have actually been mentioned in the interview but are incredibly

important so from a research point of view if you're looking across a number of

different interviews this enables you to group things together that initially on the

face of it may not be that related.

Again just like the transcript upstairs we can just click straight to that and it'll

take you to the position there.

H: "Well it's not altogether uninteresting that my successor in the Chair at Pathology at

Oxford is an Australian".

M: Okay.

With Howard's interview there are a number of sessions so sometimes

interviews only go for a single session but here we can see that he went for three sessions,

so session 1, session 2, session 3 and again we've got scrolling bars there

that we can look at for all those recordings.

We can also synchronise the recordings so at the moment the sync is on so as the

recording plays you'll see the transcript and the summary gently bounce down to keep

up to speed or we can turn that feature off as well if we wish.

What we can also do though which is really exciting is that if you are using these

interviews for research purposes it's possible to cite the section of the audio so say for

example we're very interested in a hospital in those days because I'm doing a research

project on hospitals I can click on this link and what it will do is generate two

weblinks for you that you can cut and paste directly into any document.

So this one for example will actually play the interview

from that particular point or if you like to

play just the paragraph that's there then you can just click on that one there and that

will take you to those points there in a completely different thing.

So what we can also do though, which I think is really amazing, is we can word

search within the audio so we do know that Sir Howard Florey was the inventor of

penicillin so we're very interested in finding out where he speaks about those things

and typing this word in here we have fully timecoded transcripts and summaries and

so straight away we can go straight to a section where he talks about penicillin.

H: "And I'd only been there four years and the chance came to move to Oxford and I

stayed there as a Professor for, what was it, 27 years

and things went fairly well oneway and another.

We had a bit of luck with penicillin, a great deal of luck in that".

M: Yeah so that's great and again I can cite that audio and paste that into my research

It's a really powerful search engine, I don't think there's too many players if

any that are like that around the world that are able to do with oral histories what we

can do here.

So just before we leave this page we can also download these items so we can go to

Download Page so should you wish to listen to the audio in a different way you can

actually download the files there or bring up a PDF or plain text version of the

summary of transcript as well.

Okay so that's looking at it through the catalogue.

What I might do now is show you a bit of added extra functionality that can be

searched through when we go through Trove.

So we're now in the Trove homepage and Trove is an amazing search portal because

it groups together so many records.

What I'm going to do is I'm going to do a little bit

of a trick where I'm just going to type in a term called "NLA.obj" and what that's going

to do is limit my search term to things within the Library because digital objects

within the Library all have this little prefix there.

Now the interesting thing about the catalogue record to do with Sir Howard Florey's

interview is that it talks about a lot of different things but what it doesn't mention

is a thing called lysozyme and the lysozyme was

a very important component part of his research and because I'm very interested in

this term I want to type it in.

It's not in the catalogue record but what's really interesting

is that it's actually embedded within the timecoded transcript and summary of the interview.

So what I've done here is just put together a little term, NLA.obj lysozyme,

press enter.

It's going to bring up a lot of different things to do with lysozyme but if

I go across the top to music, audio and video I can see here that's brought back one

hit, being the fantastic interview we've just been listening to.

I'll click on that interview and I can see a couple of things there,

listen, listen.

Brings up our player.

Now if I type in lysozyme again

all of a sudden I'm where he starts talking about that, I

can go straight to that section - H: "... but in the laboratory at that time we

were working on an antibacterial substance named lysozyme".

M: So what's really powerful is that all of a sudden we've gone way beyond the

catalogue record straight to the actual transcript and summary.

So it's a really great way to find exactly what you're after really

quickly.

That concludes my demonstration of searching and finding the Library's amazing

collection of oral histories online.

You'll have no shortage of things to listen to with

over 13,750 hours available.

I thoroughly encourage you to go online and have a

listen right now.

End of recording

Transcribed by audio.net.au

Good afternoon, everyone. My name is  Andrew Sergeant and I’m one of the reference  

librarians here at the National Library.  Today I’ll be taking you on a brief tour of  

the Australian Joint Copying Project which was  recently converted from microfilm to digital  

format and made freely available online. Firstly  I’d like to acknowledge the traditional custodians  

of the land on which the Library stands, the  Ngunnawal and the Ngambri people and acknowledge  

their elders past, present and emerging. In  this 250th anniversary year of the arrival  

of James Cook I would especially acknowledge and  welcome all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander  

attendees who may have registered for today’s  session. The Australian Joint Copying Project  

commonly referred to as the AJCP is a collection  of unique historical material relating to  

Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific dating from  1560 through to 1984. Beginning in 1948 teams of  

librarians and archivists under the coordination  of the National Library and the State Library of  

New South Wales went to the UK and selectively  microfilmed vast amounts of government records  

that were held in the then Public Record  Office now known as the National Archives  

as well as other material from libraries,  county record offices, religious societies,  

business organisations and private families  and individuals. The Project was later joined  

by the National Library of New Zealand and other  state and university libraries around Australia.  

They wound up after almost 50 years in  1997 with over 10,400 reels of microfilm.  

Now there were two series of reels created, the  PRO series for Public Record Office material  

and the M or Miscellaneous  series for the other material.  

Within the PRO group the despatches,  correspondence, letterbooks and registers of the  

Colonial Office and the Dominion Office dominate,  they comprise almost 40% of the total number of  

records in the entire project. In addition to  the huge record classes dealing specifically  

with the colonies other subjects include  colonial appointments, honours, emigration,  

overseas settlement schemes, the world wars  and imperial policies and relations generally.  

Other departments in the PRO that were filmed  by the AJCP include Admiralty, Home Office,  

War Office, Air Ministry, Foreign Office, Privy  Council, Treasury, Board of Customs and the Board  

of Trade. The M series is predominantly private  records but also includes some official records  

including selections from the archives of the  Hydrographic Office, the Post Office and the  

Ministry of Defence. Eighteenth century material  in the M series is mainly maritime records  

including blogs and journals of most of the early  British explorers of the Pacific. There’s a large  

amount of 19th century records which include  things like emigrant diaries and letters,  

convict records, archives of missionary societies,  scientific records and the papers of politicians  

and officials. Twentieth century material  includes important sources on imperial relations,  

migration, trade, public finance, business,  wars and defence and scientific research.  

Now to allow users to determine what reel  of microfilm they needed amongst this vast  

amount of material the Project published 11 paper  handbooks and also created over 500 individual  

descriptive lists in the Miscellaneous series,  in all over 10,000 pages of text. The handbooks  

on the screen now are Part 11 covering items  that were filmed towards the end of the project  

and Part 8 covering Miscellaneous series.  Many of you watching this may be familiar  

with using these handbooks either here or at  your state library or institutional library.  

Beginning in 2017 the Commonwealth Government’s  Public Service Modernisation Fund provided the  

Library with the unique opportunity to transform  the way AJCP content is presented and accessed  

taking it from the analogue to the digital.  Beginning by scanning the existing handbooks  

and putting them online the Project team  then went about digitising 8.2 million  

frames of microfilm and converting about 10,000  pages of descriptive text into online finding aids  

and in the process providing online access to  anyone anywhere with an internet connection to  

material that was previously only available onsite  in libraries and archives using cumbersome and  

noisy microfilm readers. There is a screenshot  of part of one of these new look finding aids,  

the Guide to the Admiralty Records  and as you can see that relates  

to Matthew Flinders and the journal  that he wrote on board The Investigator.  

One of the achievements of the project  team was the creation of a brand new  

gateway to the content. You can find  this portal through Google of course  

or from the Library’s home page. To do that hover  your mouse over the Using The Library heading at  

the top of the screen where you’ll see the link  to the AJCP under Research Tools and Resources.  

There are several other ways to get into  AJCP material including fighting AJCP records  

through the Library’s catalogue and in Trove  but I personally find this is the easiest,  

most methodical way into it. You can see from the  screenshot that you can either search by keyword  

or use the finding aids to  navigate to where you want to  

go to and the content is all accessed in the  diaries, letters and archive zone of Trove.  

Here's the A to Z list for the PRO Series so there  are now 24 finding aids arranged by the name of  

the originating government agency and including  one for some personal questions held at the  

TNA. Simply click on any of these to go  through to the finding aid for that agency.  

Under the Miscellaneous series link on the  portal you’ll get an alphabetical list of  

over 500 separate collections of material. Again  click on any of these to go to the finding aid.  

Now I’d like to show you a couple of examples  of what you’ll find and how to use the Trove  

viewing screen. Firstly as you can see I’m going  to search for the phrase Empire Air Training  

Scheme using the quotation marks to search for  the phrase and that drops me into Trove with 10  

results. When I click on the title and then on  the Get tab I have a link through to this page  

which gives me the option of  browsing that collection of records  

or going to the finding aid. The finding aid  option takes me straight to the right place.  

Then I click on the thumbnail  and go through to the images.  

Here’s one I chose at random. This image as you  can see is part typescript and part manuscript.  

The vast majority of the items  in the AJCP are manuscript  

and for this reason it was not possible to  utilise optical character recognition software  

which only works with the printed page  such as the digitised newspapers in Trove  

hence you can’t do a keyword search for  any of the words that you see on this page.  

Searches will only operate from the  descriptions in the finding aids  

or on other metadata such as subject  headings, geographical locations,  

microfilm reel numbers or tags that  have been added to the Trove record.  

By the way users are welcome to create their own  tags just as you can for the other zones in Trove.  

Okay, I’m now going to use the  Browse finding aid function.  

This could be particularly useful where you want  to see what may be in a whole series, for example.  

I’m going to use it to find some pay lists for  one of the British regiments that served in  

Australia in the 19th century. The 73rd Perthshire  Regiment of Foot replaced the disgraced New South  

Wales Corps better known as the Rum Corps  in 1810 and served in New South Wales and  

Tasmania under Governor Macquarie until 1817.  So firstly I'm going to use the PRO series link  

and the records I’m after will be found under the  War Office. This takes me to the finding aid. If  

I drill down into the item descriptions on the  left side of the screen I’ll find the right series  

and it’s series WO12 Muster Books and Pay Lists.  I could now just scroll down through the lists  

on the right that are arranged by regiment number  until I eventually reach the 73rd which is there  

or I could also have searched this  finding aid for what I wanted.  

Here’s a page opening from a quarterly pay list  for the regiment from December 1811 to March 1812.  

Now while I’m on this screen you’ll see the  citation. This one is rather long but you can just  

copy it from the details icon in the Trove viewing  screen and get the permalink in the site icon.  

There's also information on preferred  citation methods in the finding aids under  

the introductory notes at the top of each  finding aid. If you’re interested there’s  

the image a little bit larger. Here’s another  example of how a citation could be done.  

Now I’d like to quickly show you some of the extra  features in the AJCP that you might find handy.  

Firstly there are permalinks to all levels  of records that will give you a URL to copy  

and paste into your document and there’s the  NLA obj number there, the permanent URL. When  

you’re looking at an image in the Trove viewing  screen itself you also have a permalink for that.  

You can see the breadcrumb trail of this  screenshot across the top of the page. This  

shows the context of the item that you’re  looking at from collection level, or fonds  

in archivist speak, down through series and  subseries and file down to the individual item.  

Click on any of these to go back to that level or  on the upper level button to go back one level.  

The icons on the left side of the  screen are what you’ll see in Trove.  

Image details, copyright information,  citation methods and download options.  

There is as you can see also a  link via the shopping cart icon  

to our Copies Direct service but if  the image quality is poor to start with  

it’s most likely due to the  original microfilm image  

and you may not get a better copy. To print an  image first download it to your device and then  

print it from there. For downloading you can  of course download single images one at a time  

like that but to do multiple images or all  images in a set click on the upper level link  

and this will take you back to the record for that  set of images. The download button there will let  

you select a range or all images in the set but be  careful because some of these are very large sets.  

Now for those that are familiar  with the old printed handbooks  

I mentioned previously that they  had been scanned and put online.  

You can find them under the Using The  Library link at the top of any NLA page  

but this time go to the Research Guides link and  they’re alphabetically listed under that link.  

Here's a screenshot of part of the Guide Page  for Handbook Part 2, the Colonial Office records  

which as I mentioned before is one of the major  features of AJCP. You’ll see the link to the  

digitised handbook – here it is, available online  – and also links to the series level information.  

If you click on any of these they will take you to  our catalogue record for that series of records,  

for example under CO714 Index to Correspondence  

you’ll get this catalogue record. Click on  the thumbnail or the digitised item link  

in the record to go through to the images. There  are now almost 900 individual catalogue records  

for series level PRO records and all miscellaneous  collection records. You could also search the  

catalogue for these records adding the  letters AJCP to your search, for example  

the Macquarie family papers can be  found in the catalogue this way.  

To wrap up now I should just  mention that if all else fails  

see the Help button at the top right  of the Trove screen and if you’re still  

having problems or just not sure where to start  your research or you’ve hit a wall on the way  

use the Ask A Librarian link on our homepage  to submit a question. We can give you tips  

or search strategies to help you out. Well I’d  better finish up now and thanks for listening.

English

AllCoursesWatched

Family History Research Tools - Trove Lists

This video does not have a transcription

Good afternoon, I’m Shannon, I work here in Family History at the Library

and welcome back to those who listened to our previous session. Today we’ve got part

2 of Newspapers for Family History Trove so let’s get right into it. I’m just going

to turn off this camera, though, so I’m not distracted by my face. In our previous

session we looked at browsing newspapers and search tips and some of the features of online

newspapers that are on Trove. In today’s session we’re going to be looking at adding

tags and notes, directing texts and managing your research with lists. So remember to get

to Trove it’s just a matter of visiting the Library’s homepage and right here under

Partner Collections we’ve got Trove or you can just Google Trove, hopefully it should

be the very first result. So we’ll just give that a click and here we are on the Trove

homepage. Now over here we’ve got two options, we’ve got signup or login. Now you can create

an account using Trove, it’s all free. Registering is different to membership to the National

Library or your local library and registering or creating an account really allows you to

make the most out of using Trove. So you can pick a username and ask for other details

such as email, password, you got to confirm your password and confirm you’re not a robot.

Can’t change username so try and keep it all above board, nothing too offensive because

other people might be able to see it. So once you’ve created an account then you can log

in. So I’m just going to log in using my username and password. Hopefully I remember

what my password is, sometimes my mind just goes completely blank. There we are so we’ve

logged into Trove now and we can see over here our signup and login buttons are gone

and it’s been replaced with my username and the dropdown menu. The first thing you

can see is the profile just here. So here’s some information that I’ve added about myself

in my biography and I’ve put I’m just a wee humble family historian and I’ve included

family names I’m researching and locational details about those surnames so this is really

useful information for other people that might stumble across my profile. So I’ve put various

surnames, I’ve been researching for a number of years now so Sutton from Parramatta, New

South Wales and originally from Middlesex in the UK and all the way down to McDermotts

in Adelaide in no particular order, it is what it is. You could put in your other research

interest or any information you want to share with others who might view your profile. When

in your profile you can look at things like text corrections that you’ve made so we

can see I’ve corrected 91 lines of text, we can look at lists I’ve created and I’ll

be going into more detail about these later as well as tags and notes. We’ve got a settings

page. In the upgraded Trove, privacy requirements. All existing accounts and newly created accounts

are set to private meaning nobody can see tags you’ve made or lists you’ve created

or notes or your biography. You can make all of your information public by clicking on

settings just up here and toggling so from private to public and vice versa. All of my

information is set to public but if you toggle it to private and back to public again, it’s

really up to you. It's a good way to keep things private if you’d like to, you might

be doing some top secret research. You might be writing a family history book and don’t

want to be gazumped by a devious cousin but in here you can see all of my settings are

set to public because I want people to be able to collaborate with me, I want people

to see lists I’m working on, tags I’ve created. I want people to see notes I’ve

made and I want people to be able to find me by searching Trove because it’s really

a way of value-adding and finding other descendants or people with similar research interests

as I have. Now that we’ve talked a little bit about the profile let’s kick on to how

we use Trove to manage our research and the first way that I’ll go into managing our

research is by using tags just here. So we can click on the tag cloud, you can see tags

that I’ve made using Trove and I’ll go into a little bit about what they are now.

Tag is a way of describing the content of an article, it makes finding content easier

and flags information for yourself and for other users. As an example lots of female

ancestors might be mentioned in the newspaper using their husband’s first name or initials

only Tagging an article is a way of making female ancestors findable using their names

instead of their husband’s names. So what we’re going to do is we’re going to go

back to Trove, back to the homepage and we’re going to search for a female ancestor. I’m

going to search for Mrs W A Flynn. Remember the way of searching that I showed you in

the previous session? In quotation marks tilda 2. We’re going to

limit our search to newspapers and gazette results, we’re going to limit our search

to newspapers under refine results. We can see the first article is Mrs W A Flynn of

Osborne Road in Manly and she’s got a snake in her garden

and here we are. So she had a three foot brown snake which she had nearly stepped on. Could

have been bad for her and her potential descendants. So you can see she’s only mentioned here

using her husband’s initials and surname so she’s not discoverable at all. Her name

was Gladys Florence Stilwell, that’s her maiden name before she was married but because

this article only mentions her as Mrs W A Flynn she won’t appear if you're searching

for Gladys Florence Stilwell. I can make her discoverable or findable on Trove under her

maiden name and forename, Gladys Florence Stilwell or after she was married she was

known as Gladys Florence Stilwell-Flynn, she went double barrel. She preferred to be known

by this name, she was fiercely proud of her maiden name and kept it her whole long life.

The way that I do this is by tagging the article so over here we can see we’ve got the information.

Remember I went through all of this in the previous session and down here we’ve got

the tags feature. So now that I’m logged in I’m going to click on the tag icon and

I’m going to add a tag. I’m going to pop in her name, Gladys Florence Stilwell. Such

a lovely surname, Stilwell, I quite like it. We’re just going to click save. There we

are, the tag’s there. I could put another tag in. You could even do something like G

F Stilwell. So now when I search for either of those terms so I could search for Gladys

Florence Stilwell or Gladys Florence Stilwell-Flynn or G F Stilwell, this article should appear

where it wouldn’t have appeared from a search of those keywords before. So we’ve made

the article, we’ve made Gladys discoverable by her own name, not just under her husband’s

name. So we’re just going to type in her name up here or any of those search terms

that I’ve got below and there the articles come up and you can see all of the tags that

I’ve made for the article just under there as well. Keep your tags brief so I usually

tag using maybe an identifier such as a name. You don’t want anything too long in the

tags because it’s just meant to be short and sharp. If you wanted to put in a longer

explanation of who Gladys was or any additional detail you’d do that by adding a note to

the article. Just down here we’ve got list and then we've got notes. We can add a note

and we might want to just explain for other people who view the article and see those

tags who Gladys was. So you could go something like Mrs W A Flynn is Gladys Florence Stilwell,

wife of William Augustus Flynn so I’ve put in additional detail just there as a note,

not a tag. It’s a bit long for a tag. You can elect to keep your note private. All my

notes are usually public. Anything you put in the notes and anything you tag will be

keyword-searchable in Trove. I’ll just show you. Sometimes Trove might take a little while

to load but give it another go in a minute or so. Sometimes a tag, list, note could take

a while to appear and here we are so we can see the article just there. So tags and notes

are really a way of making things more discoverable so a good example is the maiden names of married

women. But you could put in literally anything and then it becomes searchable via Trove.

Here’s a sneaky note I added to an article long, long ago to prove my point. So I put

in a tag, woozlewazzle. Needless to say the word woozlewazzle doesn’t appear anywhere

in this article but because I’ve popped it in there it becomes keyword-searchable.

I can also delete tags that I’ve put in which is one of the real benefits of registering

for Trove. You don’t need to register to add tags to articles and you don’t need

to sign up or log in but it gives you a level of control over content that you add in there.

So we can just delete that tag because I’m the creator, I put that tag in, I can also

get rid of it when I’m signed in. Again we can see all tags that were created in a

tag cloud on our profile so we just click up here on the dropdown, click tags and we

can see our tag cloud here and all of the tags that I previously created. If I click

on any of these tags it should bring up articles used with that tag or where I’ve used that

tag. So I might just show you an example, I might click on Henry Darlow Sutton. You

can see I’ve used this tag 12 times and I’ve just clicked on it and then it brings

up all of those articles that I’ve used that tag with. Again I can delete most of

these tags that I’ve created. If you tag it, obviously if you delete your tag it won’t

be added to your tag cloud. Ok So that’s tagging. Another excellent way to save and

organise your research is via lists. Okay so just up here under my profile I’m going

to click on lists so we’re going to see an example of some lists I’ve created. Lists

are a great way of saving articles you’ve found about a particular person or subject

in one easy to find and keep track of place. It’s a great way to keep track of your family

history finds on Trove. We can see down here examples of lists I’ve created. I’ve got

quite a few lists. Some of them don’t have many in them but some of them have quite a

few articles. I’ll click on a list to show you an example of a list I’ve made.

We can see here my list for Henry Darlow Sutton and you see a description of this list and this

description is really useful for me when I launch back into Trove and want to start researching

Henry again. Because I’ve got quite a few people on my family tree I find having this

information such as who he is, how he’s connected to me so he’s my great times three

grandfather, I’ve got some information about how I’m descended from him. All of these

people are deceased so I don’t mind listing them here but I probably wouldn’t put names

of people that are still alive. I’ve got his details about his birth and his parentage

and his descent, what he worked as so again useful keywords that I could pop in maybe

as a Boolean and search so I could go Henry Sutton and Baker, and remember we covered

that in a previous session. Details about who he married and where they lived and then

finally when he died so I can limit my search to when he was at least alive. Down here we’ve

got a permanent link to this list so I can send any other family and I’ve sent that

persistently to quite a few family members who are interested in my family history research.

Down here we can see all of the articles that I’ve saved about Henry. We can see the tags

that I’ve popped in and you can also see notes to item that you’ve added to list.

I’ll go into this a bit more as well. So these little snippets or these notes that

I’ve added to articles are really useful because it means I don’t have to go back

and read the article to find particular parts of information that I’m after so location

of death, residence, the fact that he was a member of a Friendly Society and other information

about notices. This one that he was fined for obscene language but I’m not quite sure

whether that’s my Henry, it sounds a bit like him. Who knows? Funeral notice so you

can see really useful information, list numerous names of children, particularly the married

names of daughters. So I find the list a fantastic way of keeping track of my research. Now that

I’ve shown you a list and all that you can achieve with it I’m going to show you how

to create a list and I'm going to use the example of Gladys who we used before, who

we tagged an article about so we might go Gladys Florence Stilwell, how to spell her

name and we search for her. We found the article about a snake in a garden, I’ll click on

that and now I’m going to add this article to a list by creating a list. So over here

just underneath the tag and above the notes is the List feature so we just give that a

click. What we do is go add so I can add it to a previous list I’ve created and I can

add it to multiple lists just by ticking in the little boxes here and clicking save. Perhaps

you’ve got an article that mentions several ancestors so you don’t want to just restrict

it to adding it to one list. We can see some of the lists have these little people symbols

next to them so groups people so this little silhouette of a person. These are collaborative

lists but there’s no list currently for Gladys or for her husband for that matter

so I’m just going to create a new list by clicking on this plus symbol here. I’m going

to add a title and I might put something like G times 3 grandmother as a description for

the list. Don’t worry too much about that in here, you can always edit that later so

that’s really just a placeholder for me. If you like to make a list private or collaborative

so private, nobody but you can see it and collaborative list we’ll go into it in a

bit more detail later. The article’s a bit self-explanatory but I could add a reason

for adding this item which then appears in the notes field in the list. So I could put

a bit more detail. Three foot brown snake in garden, Gladys almost stepped on it. Then

we can click save. Then we can see that the article appears in this list so there we are.

If we go back into our lists just by clicking our profile up here I think we’ve now got

Gladys Florence Stilwell in our lists section, we can just click on that and again sometimes

it could take a little while for the content to load so I usually give it a couple of minutes

but I’ve just refreshed the page and here it is. We can see the article saved in here

with my note, we can see all the tags I’ve made and I can always edit the description

by going into manage this list here, edit list details and changing it up a little.

Heaps of detail, you saw my other list about Henry Darlow Sutton. You can also delete this

list and you can change a list from public to private to collaborative which I’ll go

into in just a moment. Once you’ve created a list it’s very easy to keep adding content

to it so I’ll go back and we’ll go another search for G F Stilwell so Gladys Florence

Stilwell and if we find any other articles about her

– there’s quite a lot of results so I might refine it just a bit further. Nice unique

name, though, Gladys Stilwell. We can see there’s a lot of articles about balls and

fancy dresses and music so if we find another article about Gladys all we need to do is

click on it, click lists, click add and it should float to the top ‘cause it’s the

most recent one we’ve created and edited. All we do is click the little tick-box and

click save just there. If we go back into the list by clicking her profile and going

lists we can now see that there’s two items in there so it’s very easy to just continue

adding articles that you find about a particular person to a list that you’ve created but

you do need to be registered to use the list feature which is why it’s important to create

a Trove account. Lists are popular with family history searches or for people with other

research interests such as cooking, recipes, craft, patterns. You can make a list about

anything. I’ve made a list about a UFO my grandfather claimed to have seen in Nowra

in the 1950s and because all of my lists are set to public and my profile’s all set to

public any list I create so the title of the list or anything I put in the description

of the list becomes discoverable and text-searchable on Trove. So not only is the top level a heading

or title of the list searchable but also this description here, any of these names that

I’ve put in are then searchable by Trove. So if somebody searches – I’ll show you,

just by copying and pasting it in there so just want to search on that and here we are

in the lists. So that’s come up in bold because it’s all searchable, everything

is searchable. You can look for specific lists by going to the list category just over here,

perhaps you want to see if somebody has worked on a list about your ancestor and you can

search Trove. I recommend just searching for a name just as we’ve done in the general

newspapers category and seeing what comes up. So a good way to see if other people are

researching the same person as you. Now we’re just going to take a look at collaborative

lists. We’re going to click on our profile and I’m going to go into lists again. So

this is a relatively new feature of Trove at the time of webinar recording. The new

feature of Trove is collaborative lists. You can work together with other Trove users on

a single list, adding content to it, deleting content and it’s a feature that I really

quite love. Before to work on a list you might have all had to share a username and a login

and a password and now you don't need to do that. So we can see here I’ve got my personal

list that only I work on and I’ve got my collaborative list just here. So here’s

some of my collaborative lists just here. Again it’s easy enough to switch from public

to private to collaborative list or to make a list collaborative. So we’ll go to Gladys,

I’ll go manage this list and then I’ll go edit list details and I’ll make this

list a collaborative list. You can add a Facebook so you can add your personal Facebook to share

or if it’s family history group you could link to that as well and then we just click

save. If I go back to lists okay we can see I’ve made the Gladys list collaborative

so we can just click on that and it should appear here under my list of collaborative

lists. To create collaborative lists your privacy setting in your profile needs to be

set to public and they appear separately to normal lists in your profile. Anyone who has

signed up to Trove can request to collaborate on your list or if you want to invite people

to collaborate on your list you just need to send them the list URL. So if we click

here Gladys is collaborative now and all you need to do is send them this. They need to

be registered and signed up and logged in and they can request to collaborate on your

list. So nobody’s requested to collaborate on Gladys’ list because I’ve just made

it collaborative but if I go back to my other collaborative lists we can see here this little

orange notification next to Ann Sutton. So we can click on Ann and we can click manage

this list and I can see some shady-looking character by the name of shanman has requested

to collaborate on my amazing list. I can now approve, decline or block their request. I

might want to find out a bit more information about who they are before I decide what to

do which is why writing a little biography and making it public can be quite useful.

So if I click on their profile, click on their username, we can look at their biography.

We can see he’s incredibly interested in Sutton family history research so I can go

back and with that information I can approve. Once you’ve approved you can control a person’s

level of access and control over the list so I can change shanman to be administrator

or change to collaborator. Once I’ve changed him to administrator, I can transfer ownership

of the list to shanman so I can click transfer ownership and give total control of the list

to shanman which sounds a bit odd but I think it’s a pretty useful feature for succession

planning. So is there somebody who you want to inherit your research? Perhaps you’ve

been researching somebody’s family history on their behalf and you want to gift them

the list so this is a way that you can do that but I don’t want to gift my list to

shanman. Once you’ve given them ownership of the list they then have to elect or they

have to agree or grant you ownership back if you ever do want it back so think long

and hard before giving somebody else your list because there’s really no way other

than them agreeing to give it back, like any gift, really. I might also like to see what

lists shanman has on the go so what list has he created? So if I click on his username

I can see his profile, text corrections he’s done. He’s very lazy, he’s only done five

lines. I can see tags he’s created, he hasn’t even made any tags, shocking. No notes but

he has made one list so you could see the list, Ann Sutton, that’s my list that he’s

collaborating on but he’s also got a list here, shanman, called Martha Caroline Burton

which is a name that I know from my family history research so I can click on that and

I can request to collaborate on his list. So that’s creating lists in a nutshell.

So we’ve gone through creating a list, adding the list, editing list and making lists collaborative

and approving, rejecting, blocking and requesting to join other people’s collaborative lists.

The last thing I want to show you in Trove is text-correcting so we’re going to perform

a search of Trove and I'm going to search for the wife of Henry Darlow Sutton, Mrs H

D Sutton. Whenever you search through Trove you might see a little note about when the

text of an article was corrected so we could see here under the first article text corrected

by you and for other Voluntroves. So because I’m logged in, I’ve signed up we can see

articles where I previously corrected the text and that’s how it appears. If there’s

no note like with this second result here it means the article has never been corrected

so we just go click. Remember I went into in the previous session optical character

recognition? It’s a process where the computer reads the newspaper and translates the text

in the newspaper in the machine-read text over here. Usually it does a pretty good job

as we can see with this article here. There doesn’t appear to be many mistakes in the

article so we could see some mistakes with the surname so that should be Rafshauge but

instead it’s rufscg. That’s an instance where the machine hasn’t correctly read

this surname up here, it hasn’t done a good job probably because the print’s a little

bit faded, little bit blurry, the resolution’s not great but usually it does a pretty good

job. The accuracy is, believe it or not, somewhere over 80%. This one’s quite good because

I think the text is very clear but let’s take a look at some really awful examples

of optical character recognition and I’m going to show you some family notices from

The Herald newspaper which was added to Trove just about a year ago, maybe a little bit

longer. So we’re going to just search Trove. It’s actually possible to search Trove for

articles which have never had corrections and the way we do that, I’ll go back to

the homepage and we’ll search Trove and we’ll go not in that Boolean phrase, colon

and we’ll got not has – sorry – colon, corrections. We can see all of our results,

there’s no little notices about text being corrected by me or by Voluntroves or anybody.

We’ll limit it to newspaper. We’ve still got quite a lot of uncorrected articles, we

can see we’ve got over 260 million so get correcting. Limit to newspaper and we’re

going to limit our search to The Herald, we’ll go Victoria and then we’ll limit to title

so The Herald just here. So we’ll limit to The Herald and we’ll scroll down just

a little bit and we’ll click family notices just over here so now we’re going to find

family notices that never had corrections. You can see the third result just over here

and we can see even just by looking at the thumbnail that the print of the newspaper

is a bit faded so we can click just here, family notices. You can see the terrible quality

of that newspaper so it’s all blurry, it’s quite faded and there’s quite good reasons

for this. Most of the newspapers on Trove are scanned from the microfilm, not from the

hard copy. The Herald was one of the earliest Australian newspapers microfilmed so the filming

wasn’t as perfect as it is today. Because the scan of the newspaper isn’t fantastic

the computer has had a really hard time of trying to read this text over here and translate

it into accurate text just over here. So none of these names here would turn up from a search

of Trove because this is the text that we’re searching. Nobody’s search for Fekhuson

and people might be searching the Essk, that could be a surname. So we can actually make

this text over here match what the newspaper says over here and make those names discoverable

and searchable which is a popular pastime of many Trove users. So we’re already in

the article text field but all we need to do to edit that is click fix or review this

text and we’re just going to put in what we can

see on the screen. Don’t get creative, it needs to match what we can see so that’s

Essk,by but it should be Essery. Then we can click save. We can keep going and text-correcting

or we can save and exit but I’m going to stop it, it’s just an example. We can see

it’s stayed corrected. So now if somebody searches for any of the names we’ve just

corrected, focus on Essery, they will appear from a research of Trove. If we click on our

profile up here we can see previous text corrections we’ve made

and we can see the past correction I made which was on today’s date, the date of recording

in The Herald in that family notice just there. So all of your past corrections should be

on your Trove profile for text corrections. So that’s text-correcting in a nutshell.

It needs to match exactly what is in the newspaper. Again don’t add even a full-stop where there

was none, it needs to exactly match. Many people just go through and correct things

like family names. I probably wouldn’t bother correcting the entire article, I’d just

correct the bits that people are likely to be searching for so it’s a great community

service that you’re doing by increasing discoverability of individuals. Instructions

on text-correcting can be found in the help pages just up here so just click help, click

become a Voluntrove and right here, correcting newspapers. So we’ve got why text needs

correcting, find articles to edit. So we’ve got why text needs editing, find articles

to edit, editing guidelines. It’s all in here, it’s a very comprehensive overview

and instruction on how to correct text on Trove. So that’s a run-through of using

Trove and keeping track of your research. I do have a few final tips before we go so

we’ll just go back to our presentation. So what should you be searching newspapers

for? The answer is everything, really. The obvious things to search for in Trove are

the names of your family members but there are certainly other things you can search

for. Ships’ names, descriptions of events, local events, global events, anything you

can think of, really, information about a particular house or street address. We’ve

got a webinar on how to research the history of your house and Trove certainly features

in that. Sometimes with family history you really need to think about the broader context

of an ancestor’s life and what was happening around them in the press. So you could search

for event descriptions, rail accidents, murders, place names, businesses, bankruptcies, advertisements.

My other bit of advice is remember name variants. Your ancestor’s name could have been written

up in a number of ways in the newspaper as we’ve seen across these previous two sessions.

Initials of given names and then fully written out surname are common in older newspapers.

Female ancestors might have been written up using their husband’s names or initials

and also try searching for nicknames. Robert could be Bob, Patrick could be Pat. Remember

my favourite way of searching Trove is to start broad and then refine using the simple

search and refer back to the first session for advice on how to do this where we went

through search tips, refining your results and all of those ways to use Boolean terms

and keywords to limit your search further. There are a number of ways you can connect

with Trove, Trove has a Facebook account, it has a YouTube channel with some instructional

videos put out by the Trove team, it has a Twitter account and there is a Trove blog.

Trove regularly posts Trove tips on social media, so it is worth signing up for the Facebook

page. The help pages are quite interesting, and they have a lot of hints about using Trove

so there’s quite a lot of information about everything we’ve covered today, specifically

about newspapers but you might also find information about other Trove categories that could be

useful for your research. If you do have a general question about using Trove for family

history or even family history more broadly it’s best to use our Ask a Librarian service,

not the Trove contact so this is where those general enquiries about family history go,

is Ask a Librarian which is just on our homepage just here. Why not take a look at our previous

webinars? For this webinar and all of our past webinars go onto our YouTube channel.

Just go to our homepage, hover over Using the Library right under here under Learning

Sessions, you’ll be able to access all of our past webinars as well as information about

upcoming sessions as well. Okay, that’s me done. I hope you’ve found something useful

in this talk. I really do thank you all for listening and I hope you have a lovely day

and happy Troving.

English

AllWatched

Good afternoon, my name’s Shannon

and I work here in Family History at the National Library.

Today’s session is Newspapers for Family History, upgraded Trove.

I’m just going to turn the camera off so I’m not distracted by my face but don’t

worry I’m still here.

In today’s session we’re going to focus on using Trove newspapers for family history.

I don’t work in the Trove team and I didn’t work on the upgrade, I’m just a humble family

historian who uses Trove

so I can’t really help with feedback as part of this webinar unfortunately.

But if you have any feedback Trove would love to hear from you directly and get in touch

with Trove via the contact form on their website.

I work here at the Library and even I have to use the form to submit feedback but it’s

pretty easy to use.

I’ll show you how to find the contact form in just a bit.

So in today’s session we’re going to be covering browsing newspapers and we’re going

to be using a family history example.

We’re going to be taking a look at some of the features of online newspapers available

on Trove and then we’re going to be looking at some search tips, some of which you might

already be familiar with but hopefully something in there that you’ve not seen before.

But first what is Trove?

Because it’s not just newspapers.

Trove is what’s called a federated search engine.

It brings together over 1,000 catalogue records from libraries, archives in museums big and

small and makes their collection searchable through one easy portal.

The best thing about Trove is that it’s free.

For family historians Trove is probably best known for its collection of digitised newspapers

which begin in 1803 with The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser.

Coverage of most newspaper titles runs through to about 1954.

There aren’t many newspapers available after 1954 due to copyright.

Some later issues of newspapers such as The Canberra Times have been made available on

Trove with the permission of the publisher and The Canberra Times goes all the way up

to 1995 on Trove.

As well as newspapers Trove also provides free access to digitised Commonwealth and

New South Wales Government Gazettes.

Gazettes are an excellent resource for family historians.

Here are just some of the things you might find using gazettes.

You might find a lot of information about convicts, I found some excellent information

about some convict ancestors such as when they were issued tickets of leave, when they

absconded, when they were granted various pardons or certificates of freedom.

You might find government employment notices such as teachers,

police positions or public servants.

You might find information about businesses founded, bankrupted, bought

and sold, extended and closed.

Probate notices, you might come across those in the government gazettes.

You might come across professional registers, architects, medical practitioners,

nurses, solicitors etc.

You might even find information about criminals and bushrangers such as reward notices and

crimes and perhaps one of my favourite but least exciting bits about the government gazettes

is the legislation, proclamations of acts and regulations.

What laws were our ancestors living under that shaped their entire lives?

But today we’ll be focusing on newspapers, not gazettes.

So to get to Trove you can access it via the National Library’s homepage, it’s right

here under partner collections or you could just Google Trove in whatever browser you’re

using and it should come up, hopefully as a first result.

So we’ll just give Trove a click, you get some cultural advice information, you click

here to find out more.

I won’t go into that too much today.

Here we are on the Trove homepage.

I just wanted to briefly cover some of the elements that we can see here.

Trove is split into a series of landing pages, explore, categories, community, research and

first Australians.

We’re not going to look at all of these today but we will be spending some time in explore.

In the top right-hand corner of the screen you can

sign up to Trove or log in if you already have an account.

We’ll talk more about this a bit later on.

It’s not necessary to create an account to just search Trove but you do need it to

create a list and it’s good to have if you are into text-correcting, tagging and putting

notes on articles because it gives you a greater level of control over edits that you can make.

I quite like checking the Trove news as there’s occasionally information about new content

that’s been added to Trove or new information about upcoming or past Trove webinars.

My other favourite page is the help page which has pages on how to search Trove.

A lot of what we’ll be covering today will be found here.

You can also access various help pages through the categories landing page just over here.

So for instance we’ve got newspapers and gazettes category.

We can click on that and we can see there’s information about those categories as well

as information about searching them.

Today we’ll be focusing our attention on the digitised newspapers available on Trove

so let’s go take a look at them.

Broadly there are two ways of locating a newspaper article using Trove, those are searching and

browsing and which one you use will depend on how much information you already have.

Browsing is particularly useful if you already know when an article was published and in

which newspaper or if you’re seeking contextual

information to bolster your family history research.

Perhaps you're looking for information about things that were happening around the time

of your ancestor’s birth, marriage or death or other life event.

What major things were happening and what made the news on a local and global scale

that could possibly have shaped our ancestors’ lives?

Context in family history is sometimes everything.

I’ll show you how to browse the newspapers on Trove using an example from one of my favourite

resources, the Ryerson index.

So we’ll just Google Ryerson.

The first thing that comes up should be the Ryerson index so it’s ryersonindex.org.

So it’s a free index to death notices, to funeral notices, to obituaries published in

Australian newspapers and it goes all the way back to when newspapers began in Australia

in 1893 through to current issues.

New content is always being added and I found a lot of notices for a lot of relatives from

searching the Ryerson, it’s a fantastic resource.

My hat goes off to all the volunteers out there that add content to it.

It’s free to search.

So we’ll click search and it’s just a matter of popping in a surname so we’ll

go Flynn and we’ll go Michael as a given name and I might know when he died or I might

have a date range.

I do know the year that Michael died, 1867 and we can see three results.

So the index gives some information such as when he died, the age, date of death if that's

mentioned in the notice, other details, in which newspaper the notice was published and

the date of publication.

So let’s go back to Trove now and look for the notice that was published about Michael

Flynn’s death in The Empire on the 9th of November 1867.

So we’re just going to close the Ryerson now and we’re going to go back to Trove.

To browse newspapers on Trove all you have to do is click explore and then click browse

newspapers and gazettes open in browser.

Here we are on the browse page.

So you can browse articles by title, place, date, category and you can have a look at

all the newspaper and gazette titles that are on Trove.

I’ll give that a quick click, just some statistics about the level of coverage on Trove.

Sometimes it could take a little while to load depending on how busy Trove is.

If you do it at peak hour which I’m currently at about lunchtime here it might take a little

while and you can see all of the titles that are on Trove and it gives you an indication

of what dates are covered as well which is really useful.

We'll go back for now and we’re looking to browse The Empire, 1867, November the 9th

for the notice of Michael Flynn so we’ll go title and then we just filter down so we

click E for Empire, we’ll see we’ve got The Empire but it was just Empire for Sydney

so we’ll give that a click.

See date range covered 1850 to 1875 and we’ll go 1867 then we can select the month from

this dropdown menu here so it was November and it was the 9th which is a Saturday.

Then we can click the page.

It’ll give an indication of the sorts of articles that are on that page so you don’t

have to exit out to page level and look through absolutely everything, if you wanted to do

that you could click the little eye and then you’ll be viewing the page.

So you could see stock and share reports on page 2, Parliament information on page 3,

shipping notifications on page 4.

We wanted family notices which are on page 1, how lucky we are.

Here we are, we’re now viewing the specific article they were after and we can magnify

or if you’ve got a scroll on your mouse you can zoom right in.

Here we can now view the death notice of Michael Flynn and it reads, on the 6th instant at

his late residence, number 3 Market Lane, Michael Flynn, late of the 50th Regiment,

aged 57 years.

So we’ve got quite a lot of information about this person in a two-line obituary or

death notice that we can then use to go and hopefully research this person

a little bit better.

We know that he was in the British Army now so we can trace information about his regiment

and maybe start asking questions, are there any records relating to that?

Any muster books and pay lists.

We also have his address so a huge amount of information in just two lines.

While we’re viewing the notice I’m just going to explain some of the elements that

we can see on this page here.

So up here you’ve got all of the options to browse further so we can go to the previous

or next issue or we can go back to browse issues, we can page-turn so previous, next

or browse pages.

We can go to the next or previous article or we can browse articles.

The magnifier’s over here, in and out.

The rotate buttons so pretty self-explanatory.

I’m not sure why you use them, maybe you have a picture that you’ve seen in a newspaper

and you want to look at it from a different angle perhaps.

The reset zoom so that takes us right back out to sort of page level.

You’ve got the maximise viewer size over here in the right corner so now we’re just

viewing the individual page.

It’s stretched across the browser window.

Just close that.

We've got the info button over here, info tab, we can just click that.

We’ve got our article identifier so if you want to send somebody a link to this article

or these notices you would copy this and send it to them or perhaps you want to save it

or bookmark it.

This is a nice clean permanent link to the article that should never break unlike this

up here which is full of the browse string that we just went through in the URL, less reliable.

We've also got the page identifier so maybe if you want to use the entire page you can

click on this here.

That’ll take us back to page level.

I’ll be going over tags, lists and notes a bit later in the talk so we won’t really

go into that too much now.

Article text so this is text generated from a process called optical character recognition

which is where a machine reads the text in the article just here and translates it into

a type script over here.

You’ve got categories so again we’re in the family notice categories.

You can download the article as an image, as a PDF or you could

download the text over here.

You can download the page or the entire issue of the newspaper.

The shopping trolley here will take you to the Library’s Copies Direct service.

Perhaps you’ve found an article that is of terrible quality on Trove.

The scans of the article tend to only be as good as the quality of the microfilm or newspaper

that the content’s digitised from but say you want a better copy.

A lot of people particularly request better copies of photos that they find in newspapers.

You can order better quality copies, high resolution digital downloads or print copies

by the Library’s Copy Direct service by filling out the online order form.

You can print the article as image or you could print the text from the article over here.

Toggle layout so that’s if you’re viewing Trove articles via a mobile device or maybe

an iPad so it switches the layout so the text appears just under here.

So that’s really in a nutshell browsing Trove newspapers.

The other way to locate articles on Trove is by keyword searching.

So we’ll go back to the Trove homepage. Here we are.

There’s a few ways to limit your search of Trove to newspapers.

On the homepage we’re greeted with a single search bar just here.

We can type in a keyword and I'm going to type in Henry Goode and hit enter or hit the

little magnifying glass, it’s up to you.

We can see we’ve got over four million newspaper results and we've got the top three results

displayed but just by using that single search bar we’ve searched across all collections

that are available via Trove so we’ve got results for magazines and newsletters, images,

maps and artefacts, research and reports, books and libraries.

Remember these results are from libraries all over Australia, over 1,000 libraries,

archives and museums contribute content to Trove’s federated search catalogue.

Easy enough to limit our search to newspapers and gazettes or just newspapers.

We just click here, see all newspaper and gazette results then we’ve just got results

for newspapers and gazettes and we can limit further to just newspapers by just clicking

on this little box just over here.

Now we’ve only got results for newspapers but we’ve still got over four million results

which isn’t a very useful search.

There’s a few other ways to limit your search to just newspapers.

Back on the Trove homepage we can type Henry Goode again, we can click the little arrow

next to all categories and limit our search right off the bat to newspapers and gazettes

and there we are.

Again you’ll need to click newspapers, just limit your search to newspapers.

You can also click explore, browse newspapers and gazettes, open browser and search newspapers

and gazettes up here so we’ve got a variety of ways to limit our search to newspapers

and gazettes if you want to search both.

So we’ve searched for Henry Goode.

Again we’ve got over four million results, it’s not a terribly useful search.

We’ve also got a high number of irrelevant results, we’ve got results for Mr Charles

Henry Goode, we've got results for Sir Charles Henry Goode, Henry Charles William Goode,

we’ve got Dulcie Goode of Hopetown, we’ve got Mr Henry Hill, Director of Goode, Durrant

& Co or is it Burrant?

Who knows?

We’ve got a huge number of irrelevant results and that’s because of the way that I formatted

my search.

If I search for Henry Goode just like this I’m going to get results for articles where

those two words appear somewhere in the article no matter how unrelated they are to each other

as we saw with Henry Healy of Goode, Durrant & Co.

So instead of just popping a name in what I’m going to do is enclose the name in quotation

marks and hit enter or the search magnifying glass.

You can see we’ve gone from over four million results to just over 7,000 results so that’s

a lot better than what we had.

By using quotation marks I’m performing what’s called a phrase search.

Some of you might also know it as a near search.

A phrase search structured like this for Henry Goode will find the words Henry and Goode

when those two words appear next to each other in an article so it’s useful for looking

for names.

This search still allows for one word in between Henry and Goode and it will still allow for

some variation in the spelling of those words to account for the imperfections of optical

character recognition.

So if Henry Goode appeared in the newspapers with a middle name this search will still

pick up those articles.

This allowance for an additional word in between a phrase is what’s known very appealingly

as a phrase slop.

In this case the phrase slop has a value of one because it allows for just one word in

between Henry and Goode

but what if I want to increase the number of words between Henry and Goode?

What if Henry Goode had two middle names?

I can still do my phrase search but increase the number of words in between Henry and Goode

by adding a little symbol called a tilde after my phrase search.

This is a tilde.

It’s a little squiggly line.

It should be just below the escape bar on your keyboard.

Just hold the shift key and press it.

Then I add the number 2.

This increases the number of words that can be between Henry and Goode to two words or

another way of putting it, we now have a phrase slop value of 2.

We can see the number of results has appeared because I’ve broadened

my search terms a little.

So now my search will pick up articles where Henry Goode appears in the paper with two middle names.

If he happened to be called something as fantastic as Henry Hubert Egbert Goode, for example,

this search should still find him.

Even more importantly, and this is why I really love the tilde 2, adding the squiggly tilde

line and the number 2 will also find articles where Henry Goode is written

in reverse word order.

So if his name was written in a newspaper as Goode comma Henry which is common in obituaries

this way of searching should still find those articles.

I find this way of searching with name in quotations, tilde symbol and the number 2

the best way to begin searching for somebody on Trove and when I'm doing my family history

this is normally the way I start structuring my very first search for a person.

It’s much more useful than performing a standard phrase search using the advanced

search function and I’ll show you why now.

So over here we’ve got the advanced search which is a feature I actually never use.

Some of you might be big fans of it, I find it’s easier to start with a broad search

and then refine using quotation marks and things like tilde symbols.

So here’s the phrase search field of the advanced search on Trove and if we pop in

his name just there and hit search it’s searching for the phrase Henry Goode.

So it’s essentially the same kind of search as if we put his name in quotation marks without

the tilde 2 so we’re not going to get things like reverse word order or up to two middle

names but we’ll still get results for things like Henry Harry Goode

where he has one middle name.

This applied as a search limit over here so we can’t even edit it so it’s much easier

just to use the simple search and pop the name in quotation marks, just so.

You can increase the number of words in between a phrase by increasing the number or the phrase

slop value after the tilde symbol.

For some obituaries you’d need to put a 6 or an 8 after the tilde symbol in order

to find them through a Trove search because of the way they’re structured with surname

at the beginning of the obituary and given name somewhere in the middle or at the end of it.

So if you’ve got something like Goode, my dearly beloved departed husband, Henry, you

might need quite a large phrase slop.

This will of course give you a huge number of irrelevant results which is why it’s

good to have indexes like the Ryerson for death notices, obituaries and funeral notices.

You can also decrease the number of words in between Henry and Goode so a basic sort

of phrase search just like this will allow for one word in between Henry and Goode.

If we don’t want any words between Henry and Goode we can just put tilde zero which

is perhaps useful if you know an ancestor who definitely did not have a middle name.

But even though we’ve gotten rid of all of the results in between Henry and Goode

this search will still allow for some fuzziness or variation of spelling and I’ll show you

some examples of this now.

So we’ve got Henry’s good, Henry Good, no E on the end, Henry Good-man, Henry Goodman.

We’ve got Henry goods so we’re still getting some variation.

This really is to account for the imperfections of optical character recognition.

I’ll be talking about how to fix this in just a little bit.

So let’s go back to our search for Henry Goode tilde 2 which is my standard way of

searching and we’ll look at ways to refine your search further.

So we’ve got almost 20,000 results.

Can limit our search to newspapers over here.

Trove makes it very easy to refine your results to a particular time or place by giving us

these filters on the right-hand side of the screen so you can sort it by state, by territory,

newspaper title – incredibly useful, category so advertising – perhaps you're just looking

for family notices, date range – a feature I use constantly, you can even limit your

search to articles which contain photos or illustrations or cartoons or maps and I have

found some photos of people I’ve researched and ancestors from looking through Trove newspapers

and limiting my search here just using this ‘photo’.

One thing I tend not to use is the word count feature, but you might want to use it.

So if I know Henry died in Rockhampton, Queensland during the 1920s I can refine my search to

the state he lived in so we could go Queensland and we’ve gone from almost 20,000 results

to just over 2,000.

I can limit my search to a local newspaper title which is an incredibly useful feature

and I might limit it to The Capricornian.

There’s a few newspapers for Rockhampton on here and I can limit my search or refine

my results to the decade that I know my Henry passed away in so I can go 1920 to 1929 and

we can see there’s two articles published about Henry Goode for that period.

We've done that and now we’ve only got two results so we’ve gone from almost 20,000

results to just two just by refining our results over here

and then we can click on the article and view it.

We can see my search terms are highlighted in yellow over here.

We can see the optical character recognition text over here.

Remember when I’ve entered search terms I'm not searching this over here, I'm not

searching that because it’s just a picture of a newspaper, what I’m searching is the

machine-read text over here, optical character recognition.

A lot of people wonder how do I get rid of that yellow highlight and just have a clean

image of the article.

It’s very easy, all you need to do is click on details just here and click the link to

article identifier which is a permanent link to the article.

So our search terms aren’t factored into the equation whereas before they’re part

of the string or the history of how we’ve found this article which you can see in the

URL just up here.

So when you search Trove you’re searching the optical character-recognised text over

here and we can see this is all looking pretty good, it’s reasonably accurate, I can’t

really see any mistakes.

That’s because it’s likely somebody has gone in and corrected it all.

This isn’t always the case and I’ll show you some examples of some badly read machine

text in the second half of this webinar.

So that’s how we’ve gone about

searching for an article of Henry Goode and refining our results.

It’s a pretty good example, it’s a reasonably clear-cut case.

Depending on your family and their circumstances and how often they were putting notices in

the paper you might have more or less luck finding articles on Trove.

That’s part of the joy of searching through newspapers, you never quite know what you’re

going to come across.

So we’ll go back now and we’ll clear all our limits but I’ll just click newspapers

so we’re not searching through gazettes.

So we’ve done a very basic search for Henry Goode and we’ve refined our results using

the features over here so using the limits to limit our search to a very specific article.

There’s another way that you can limit your search or refine your results and it’s by

using what librarians call Boolean terms or expressions.

You can modify your search of Trove or an individual or for anything, really, with just

three little words which are AND, OR and NOT.

So you can see we’ve searched for Henry Goode and there’s a Sir Charles Henry Goode

who’s popping up quite a lot in our searches.

Because he’s somebody quite famous he’s going to appear everywhere and really take

up a lot of space in our search results that we might not want.

It's very easy to eliminate him from our search equation.

The way we do that is by using Boolean term NOT.

So we can get rid of Charles by searching for articles that contain the phrase Henry

Goode but not Charles.

So we’ve got rid of all of the articles that contain the phrase Henry Goode and also

contain the phrase Charles.

There’s a real problem with this search technique.

It will get rid of results that might be relevant because it will remove all articles that mention

Henry Goode that contain the word, Charles.

What if Henry Goode had a son named Charles who is mentioned in an article about him?

Or what if a Charles is mentioned in a death notice on the next line up or a few lines

down in the article about family notices?

We’ve eliminated it from our results so you could potentially get rid of results that

you’d want to see.

But it can be useful if you’re getting a number of results that aren’t relevant.

If your ancestor had the same name as somebody famous like an actor or a Lord or Lady or

Sir – I’ve got a convict Henry Sutton who shares a name with an inventor who tends

to hijack my search results – you can try searching for their name and then NOT actor

or NOT Lady or NOT inventor to get rid of those results that you don’t want if they’re

appearing en masse.

So NOT is useful to eliminate results.

Another Boolean term I use all the time is OR.

Henry Goode wasn’t always mentioned by his full name.

Conventions of historic newspapers tend to be first initial only, he was often only mentioned

as H Goode.

So I can find all newspaper articles that mention either Henry Goode or H Goode at the

same time by using OR.

All I’m going to do is put in OR in caps and put in H Goode just as another phrase

search, the same I did as previous with Henry.

I’m going to hit search.

The number of results will of course jump.

That’s because I’m now searching for articles that contain either the phrase Henry Goode

or the phrase H Goode.

My favourite Boolean expression or term, though, is the word AND. AND does the opposite of

NOT, it tells Trove to combine our search phrase with another word so OR was an either

or search, and combines the phrase Henry Goode with another word and finds all articles that

contain this phrase.

Perhaps we’ll put in another word such as the name of the town that he lived in, Rockhampton.

So now we’ve hit search, we’ve got just under 800 results and all of the results should

contain the phrase Henry Goode and the word Rockhampton so it’s a really useful way

of limiting your search to search for an individual that was living in a particular place.

You can really build on your search using these Boolean phrases and it’s quite useful

if you are searching for a specific bit of information.

I know that my Henry was a photographer when he lived in Rockhampton so perhaps I want

to find articles that mention this and his activities as a

photographer while he was in that town.

So I can go Henry Goode AND Rockhampton AND photographer

and now we should get all articles that mention the phrase Henry Goode as well as the words

Rockhampton and photographer.

You can see we’ve only got just under 170 results now so you can see it’s a constant

process of refining our search by using Boolean searching.

So we’ve got quite good relevancy.

The truth is you don’t even really need to include the word AND.

A lot of people use plus instead so plus, no space and we can see it’s done the same

thing, same number of results.

You don’t even really need to do that for AND, you can just type it in and it should

automatically factor that you’re looking for articles which contain the phrase Henry

Goode and the words Rockhampton photographer.

But I find it useful because I like to see precisely how my search is structured.

So if you know the name or occupation or the names of children or the parents or spouse

of an ancestor or any other identifying features such as an address try phrase searching of

a person and use a Boolean search AND

to combine your initial results with another word or phrase.

There are however very specific rules about combining an OR search

with Boolean expressions AND and NOT.

You need to group your OR phrases together using brackets and this is where it starts

to get very complicated.

So remember our search for Henry Goode was Henry Goode OR H Goode?

If we structure our search like this, Henry Goode OR H Goode AND Rockhampton we’re going

to get results for articles that mention the phrase Henry Goode or articles that mention

the phrase H Goode AND Rockhampton, we’re not going to find articles that mention necessarily

Henry Goode and Rockhampton.

So we need to group Henry Goode or H Goode together using brackets just like so, very

easy and there we have it.

Now we should find articles that mention the phrase Henry Goode and Rockhampton OR H Goode

AND Rockhampton if that makes sense.

It’s a bit tricky, things can start looking like a mathematical equation.

There’s instructions on the help pages if you get stuck but it’s just important to

be mindful of that when you’re playing around with the Boolean OR search.

I do have one last advanced tip for searching on Trove.

Remember before we discussed decreasing the phrase slop to exclude or include things such

as middle names and reverse word order but how we’re still getting variation in the

spelling of those two words even when we search for something like Henry Goode zero to eliminate

middle names, we’ll still get variation in spelling of the word Henry and Goode.

If you wanted to do what’s called an exact search so you only want to find results for

articles with those words exactly as they’re spelt in the newspaper it is a little bit

complicated so bear with me as we’ll look at how it’s done.

I’m going to step away from Henry for a little while and use another example and the

example that I’m going to use is Frank Major.

If I just search Trove for Frank Major like I usually would even using the technique of

phrase or near searching, if we scroll down the page you can see everything, all kind

of results that aren’t relevant.

Major is a rank so we’re getting results for Major Frank Parker and major is also an

adjective so we’re getting results talking about

the time in 1954 that Frank took a major share.

Even if I reduce the phrase slop to zero it’s still not quite an exact search and of course

it’s by relevancies so it looks good but if we go to the last page remember we’re

still getting variation in the spelling of those two words so we’ve got Frank Majority

and we’ve got Frank’s major still.

Remember Trove will always allow for some fuzziness or variation in how two words within

a phase is spelt to compensate for the imperfections of character recognition.

To do an exact search all I need to do is type the word full text colon before Frank

Major, keeping the phrase slop as zero and hit enter.

If I do this by using that full text search I will only get results for Frank Major, no

middle names, no reverse word order and no variation

or fuzziness in the spelling of Frank and Major.

Often you don’t want to do an exact search because you’ll miss out on things.

Remember allowing for some inaccuracy is useful.

The one thing to keep in mind is that it’s better to start broad and then refine and

try using Boolean terms to build your search.

That said, if you have a family member who has the same name as a ship or a rank or perhaps

you’ve got somebody with a surname of Field and you’re getting articles about sporting

ovals all over the country an exact search can be useful.

So that’s the basics of searching Trove.

All the tips about Boolean searching and more can be found on the Trove help pages just up here

and happy Troveing.

Hi everyone, My name’s Cheney and I’m part of the Trove team.

I am going to start our demonstrations today with one of the first things that many people

do in Trove which is starting by logging into their Trove account.

So I’m just going to stop the video and start screensharing with you.

Okay so you don’t need to have an account in Trove, you can search, you can browse,

you can access our online items and you can even correct text all without a Trove account

but if you’d like to keep track of what you do in Trove, for example if you want to

share your research with other people, if you want to access features like Trove lists

then you’ll probably want to sign up.

It’s free, all you need is a username, an email address and a password.

So if you already have an account in Trove you just want to go to the login screen at

the top right here.

So to create an account you’d actually select sign up instead and follow the prompts.

So then you want to enter your username and your password.

Just noting also too, there was a prompt to be able to reset your password in that screen

if you’d forgotten it and also create an account if you don’t have one.

So once you’re logged in your username appears in the top right-hand corner just right here.

We’ve added a lot more options for user settings and privacy as of the June update

so here’s how to see them.

So go into your account and open my profile.

From here you want to go into the settings tab.

All of the information in the settings section relates to your privacy settings.

You can choose which aspects of your activity you’d like to keep private and also what

you’d like to make public, this is all up to you.

I’d recommend experimenting with your settings to see what feels right.

If you’d like to make Trove lists with other people or you want to request to help other

people make lists you’ll need to make your user profile public so this is the first setting

that’s just here on the left-hand side.

So this means that other people in Trove will be able to see your Trove username, especially

the collaborative lists that you have made.

Making your user activity public, which is just down here, will let people see your name

attached to the tags, the notes and the text corrections that you’ve made.

These won’t appear to other people in the search results screens but your name will

appear in the newspaper’s viewer and on item records next to like I said the lists

and the tags that you’ve made.

So that’s your privacy settings.

Like I said, have a bit of an experiment and see what works for you.

Your user account also has sections where you can see all of the things that you’ve

added to Trove so it has a notes section which tracks all of your notes, same goes for tags.

It also has a section for lists which Ill revisit later in our demo and then it also

has a text corrections section so if you are a text-corrector this will show your rank

as a text-corrector overall.

All of the corrections that you’ve done plus as well under each of your corrections

a compare function that lets you see where you were last up to.

So if I open that compare section just underneath every text correction it opens a screen showing

where you’re up to and collapse that to get out of it.

So that's a really brief overview of your user account and now I’m going to hand over

to Tighearnan to cover basic search and categories.

TIGHEARNAN: Hi, my name’s Tighearnan, I’m going to take you through some of the basic

search and categories functions in the new Trove.

So just for a start what can you do in simple search?

Simple search is useful if you have a general search term and you’re happy to refine your

search to narrow your results progressively.

So what we’ll do, we'll go in, have a little bit of a look at performing a simple search.

I’ll just [clicks] and let’s get started.

So you can start a simple search on the homepage.

You can get to the homepage by clicking on the Trove logo at the top of any pages in

Trove, this is the Trove logo that you can click on to get to the homepage.

So in the search box here you can enter a search term.

The term I’m going to use is Honeysuckle Creek.

As you can see I may have already done this one before.

So as you type you’ll see the magnifying glass on the right becomes green.

When you’re ready you can click on that to search.

Categories which are here are groupings of items by a particular format type.

Instead of clicking straight onto the green search button you can focus your search by

clicking the all categories dropdown so you can just click here and to select the category

from your homepage simple search you click all categories and choose a specific category.

In this example we’re going to have a look at magazines and newsletters.

If I click on search there you go, we get a result from magazines and newsletters.

If we hadn’t selected a category in our original search from the homepage we will

arrive at the all results page which is here.

This page provides a great overview of all the content in Trove for your search term.

You’re presented with the top three results from each category within Trove so newspapers

and gazettes is the very first one that we’ll see.

Magazines and newsletters underneath, images, maps and artefacts.

To get results for just one category you can click on the green button in each set of results,

for example images, maps and artefacts and that takes you to images, maps and artefacts.

Or you can also narrow your search by category by using the search bar at the top of the

screen.

So we’ll just pop back into magazines and newsletters.

Help pages are available for each category under the help menu at the top of screen,

right?

As a bit of an overview newspapers, gazettes and magazines and newsletters and here are

categories that focus on digitised items that you can read on Trove.

Websites there are archive snapshots of Australian websites.

Due to the size of this category we need extra verification to access if you aren’t logged

in.

This is so we don’t have search bots crawling the service and slowing Trove down.

In order to actually see the results you just need to hit reveal and make sure that you

are a human.

There you go and now we have all of our website’s results.

So we can also look really quickly at people and organisations.

This is where you’ll find information on organisations and people, music, audio and

video, where you find sound recordings, you’ll find other little bits and pieces, video,

diaries, letters and archives, where you’ll find little bits of ephemera, photographs,

papers by people who generally worked in and around Honeysuckle Creek, research and reports,

generally government publications.

Books and libraries is where you can find items you'd expect to find in a library and

points you towards where you can actually access the items.

It will give you holding locations and it will also give you links to digitised content

as well.

So if we click on the record here and Borrow gives us all of the holding libraries and

if there is a digitised item it will appear under Read.

We'll pop back into our search results, Images, Maps and Artefacts, obviously images, maps

and artefacts and we’ve already had a quick discussion about magazines and newsletters

and newspapers and gazettes.

The results page is made up of four areas, search, results list, sorting and refining.

By default the most relevant searches appear at the top of the list but you might want

to find the earliest occurrence of a search term by correcting a topic in chronological

order.

You can change the result list to sort by date, either earliest or latest, so

earliest or latest.

So while reviewing results within a category you have the option to refine your results.

Filters are available on the right-hand side of the page and certain categories offer certain

filters.

So we’re looking at newspapers and gazettes, what if I only want items from a newspaper?

I can click on newspaper and only items from newspapers appear.

Gazettes are generally government publications so the Government Gazettes.

What if I want to narrow down by let’s say advertising?

I’m looking for a particular advertisement about Honeysuckle Creek.

I click on the category and there it goes, I have advertising specifically relating to

Honeysuckle Creek.

Now what if I want to specifically find something from let’s say a Victorian publication.

I’ll go to place and click on Victoria and here are just results from Victoria from the

newspaper set that are specifically advertising.

Now I can also select a date range as well because I want specific things to a specific

era.

Now 1900 is around about what I’m actually looking for so I’m going to click 1900 to

1909 and there we go, we’ve got lots of bits and pieces.

Honeysuckle Creek, 1909 through to 1900 and I can even go a little bit further down and

actually refine by year and then also I can refine by month as well but that’s probably

a little bit too detailed to go into at the moment.

Now it is important to remember you can only choose one item at a time under each refine

your results filter so when you search states it’s either across all states and if I unclick

Victoria here it’s currently across all states or it’s only for one, Victoria here.

So you can pick multiple filters as we have done but they can only be one under each type.

Okay?

To view all available options of a filter type you can select the show more option so

for instance under title here show more.

As I mentioned before with the date range you do get the option to filter down more

dates as you go.

To broaden your search out again we can remove filters by either clicking the checkboxes

here or by clicking on the little X button at the top here.

Just add another one real quick to show you that you can also click clear all and that

actually clears all of the filters that you have on the screen at present and you get

all of your results from the start back again.

If you’d like to select multiple filters for places you can do that in advanced search

and we actually have that in one of our earlier webinars, a little bit of an instruction on

how to do that.

So now I’m going to hand back to Cheney to talk about collaborative lists.

CHENEY: Okay so now I’m going to talk about what to do if you find something while searching

that you’d like to come back to.

So if you have a Trove account you can create lists.

Lists can be for your personal use, they can be public and discoverable to people searching

Trove or they can be collaborative lists that you allow other people to work on with you.

So I’m going to go back into Trove.

So you need to be logged in to create lists so make sure that your account name is appearing

in the top right-hand corner and I’m just going to log back in again.

Okay, there we go.

So my name’s now appearing in the top right-hand corner so I know that I can make lists.

So once you're in a search, and I might use Tighearnan’s existing search for Honeysuckle

Creek and I'm going to pick an item from newspapers and gazettes and go into the viewer because

if you’re wanting to make a list and add a newspapers or a gazette article the easiest

way to do that is in the viewer.

So I’m going to click on the first result here.

So to add an item from the newspapers and gazettes viewer we’ve opened it in the viewer

and on the left-hand side you want to be looking for an icon that looks a bit like a list so

that’s this one here.

So if you click on the icon it will show you all of the lists that the item is currently

in.

As you can see this doesn’t appear in any lists yet so you want to click add to add

it to one of your lists.

So this gives the option to add to any of the current lists that you have.

As you can see I’ve got a little list there or you can select the blue cross here to create

a new list to add your item too.

So I am going to create a new list and so you want to fill in the details by giving

it a title and I want to make it a private list and then you hit save so there you go.

So that’s how you add a newspaper or a gazette article to a list straight from the viewer.

So what do you do if you want to add an item that isn’t a newspaper or a gazette article

to a list?

The process is slightly different as you want to go through the item’s record in Trove.

So I’m going to close out of here and go back to our list of results.

I’m going to select a new category, magazines and newsletters just to show you how to add

an item to a list from a record.

So you click on the item’s title to open up the record so here we go, we’re in the

record now and then all we want to do is scroll down to find the option, add to list and that’s

just at the bottom here.

So again like in the viewer this gives you the option to add to any of your existing

lists or create a new one and I'm going to add to my existing list for Honeysuckle Creek

just right here.

Then fill in the details and save and I’ve even got a little update there that I’ve

added a new discovery to my Trove list which is quite nice.

So there are different settings for lists depending on what you’d like to do with

it and who you’d like to be able to see it so these settings can be changed in your

Trove account.

I’m going to show you a little bit about how to do that here.

So start by going into the lists section of your Trove account.

Scroll down, you’ll just see that here.

So here you can see all of your current lists and I want to select the option to manage

this list so here is my Honeysuckle Creek list.

So from here you can reorder your list items, you can also add notes to your list items

but what we actually want is the button here that says edit list details.

So I’m actually going to make my list public.

This means that anybody searching Trove can look for and find my list if they search for

Honeysuckle Creek and then also if I want to make my list collaborative and I want other

people to be able to add items to my list I just hit this slider here.

So once I save this people can search for this list and also request to join.

I’ll get those requests in my account and I can approve them as I like.

It's important to note here again that my user profile needs to be set to public like

I showed you earlier, before I can make a list collaborative.

This is so other people can see my username attached to my list and can potentially tell

it apart from other lists with a similar or even the same name.

I’m just going to show you a little bit more about collaborative lists just so you

can see what it looks like if you search for a collaborative list that somebody else has

made and request to join.

So I’m actually logged in now in my other Trove account.

You can see my username has changed here on the right-hand side and I’m going to do

a search for Honeysuckle Creek because I know that there’s a collaborative list that was

just created on this topic.

I’m actually too going to select from the category lists and go straight to the lists

section.

So if I hit the green button here I can see all of the Trove lists that have been created

on Honeysuckle Creek and the first one in the list here is a collaborative list with

two items and I can see that it was created under my previous username so I know that

it’s the right one.

So if I select the list here and go straight into it I can see this green button here that

says request to join.

Now it’s important to note that if I want to join a collaborative list, like I said

earlier I also need to have my user profile set to public for this account as well so

you can create a collaborative list if your user profile is public as well as request

to join.

So here I’ll just click this button, request to join and there we go so I get this message

saying thank you, your request to join this list is with the owner list for review.

So that means that the next time I log in under my other account I’ll be able to see

that request there and approve it as needed.

So that’s just a little tip to show you how that looks on the other side.

So that concludes our demonstrations for today.

Thank you for watching.

I hope that it has been helpful for you in getting around some of the new features of

Trove.

As Tighearnan mentioned earlier if you’d like some additional information on particularly

searching in the newspapers category or doing advanced searches we have information in a

previously recorded webinar on Trove’s YouTube channel and we also have all of the previous

National Library learning program webinars on the National Library’s YouTube channel

as well.

My name is Heather and I am the Digital Education Coordinator here at the National Library.

Before we start this short video I’ll just turn off the camera.

Before we start today’s video I would like to pay my respects to the Ngunnawal and Ngambri

people on whose land this video was recorded.

I acknowledge the deep and enduring connection of all indigenous Australians to country and

I pay my deepest respect to elders past, present and emerging.

I would also like to extend my respects to the traditional owners of the lands from which

you may be joining me today, including the Cammeraygal people on whose country I grew

up on in Sydney’s northern suburbs.

Alright so let’s launch into our subject today.

This year for Bastille Day, the national holiday of France, we thought to share with you a

great French language resource that is online and freely accessible.

In this short discovery video we will discover Le Courrier Australien, a French English bilingual

publication that is one of Australia’s oldest surviving foreign language newspapers.

It is available online and at your fingertips through Trove.

In fact you can see it here on the screen in front of you, the very first edition of

Le Courrier Australien printed on Saturday, the 30th of April 1892.

From this time until 2011 this newspaper was in print format.

These issues have now been digitised and they’re available to view through Trove.Le Courrier

Australien is not all written in French language as you might assume.

In fact it is an interesting combination of both French and English language articles.

When it first started back in the late 1800s it was one of the only sources of information

about news and events in France and other Francophone countries such as Belgium.

As well as Francophile events that were happening here in Australia the newspaper covers a range

of subjects such as science and trade, literature and fine arts, fashion, visits from French

personalities to Australia, politics, the first and second world wars and other content

relating to politics more broadly.

There are advertisements for products and companies and notices, much like other newspapers.

The list really does go on about what you can expect to find here.

Le Courrier is excellent if you are interested in learning more about history as it relates

to the French community in Australia and French and Australian history and relations generally.

Today Le Courrier Australien is a website, it covers everything the newspaper covered

in terms of the content and advertisements and you can still access the content in both

French and English languages.

So let’s have a look at Le Courrier Australien in context.

I will show you how to do a basic search, how to download an article and where to find

citation information in Trove.

Lastly, parlez-vous français?

Do you speak French or are you learning to read and write in French?

I will show you how you can make this amazing resource more discoverable by correcting articles

that have been incorrectly transcribed by the OCR, that is the optical character recognition

software.

As you can imagine the words often get jumbled and the special characters such as the grave

accent, the acute accent or the cedilla, that squiggle under the C in Francais aren’t

recognised.

If you are interested in French history and how it connects with Australian history you

might find this a simple and fun way to get involved and learn along the way.

Okay, let’s redirect now to the Trove homepage and take a look at a basic search.

I’ll click on the Trove icon and that will redirect us to the homepage.

Okay, there are two simple ways to do a basic search.

The first one you can jump straight in and use the title of the newspaper as keywords

and type them into the search bar.

Change the category to newspapers and gazettes and hit search and away we go.

You can see here there is a long list of results.

To reduce this list use the panel on the right, limiting the results as you like.

Let's click on title, for example, so that we know the content we’re looking at comes

from Le Courrier and for something fun we can limit the category or type of content

to humour.

In this case there is only one article showing so let’s click on this.

In fact it is an article that includes cartoons created by the Noumea-born cartoonist, Emile

Mercier.

During his lifetime Mercier contributed cartoons to many different Australian newspapers.

His cartoons are witty and comment on the daily life of Australians as they were during

his lifetime.

In this case the article and cartoons cross over two pages.

Using this handy tab up the top you can simply browse through these pages as you would if

you had the paper in front of you and flip from page to page.

Here we can zoom in and have a look at the detail of some of his cartoons.

We can also zoom out and view the cartoons in context.

So now that we've had a look at this way of doing a basic search let’s go back to the

Trove homepage and look at another option to browse issues of Le Courrier Australien.

Now that we are back on the homepage what we need to do is click on the explore tab

at the top here and underneath the browse newspapers and gazettes we’re going to open

the browser.

From here we’ll go to browse titles and under the column of titles A to Z we’ll

go down to L. Carefully scroll down the list of titles in the L category until you happen

upon Le Courrier Australien.

Now you’ll see a column with the life dates from 1892 all the way to 2011.

I’m particularly interested in the period of the 1940s so why don’t we have a look

at the 1945 issue.

If we go to July, given that we’re thinking about Bastille Day, and we’re in luck, we

can see that we have Friday the 13th, the day before Bastille Day.

We’ll click on that and what we have is a list of pages for that issue.

If I click on the eye symbol on the right-hand side that will bring up the first page in

its entirety.

If I click on the reset zoom button it will centre the first page here.

If I hover over the different articles on this page and click you’ll see that I’m

presented with an option to read this particular article or you can use the list on the left-hand

side and select which article you would like to read.

As you can see here the article at the bottom, France’s National Day, is written in English

whereas the other articles here are in French language.

If I click on the second article we can see the images highlighted.

The image shows a scene of the storming of the Bastille on the 14th of July 1789 and

which was the event that marks the beginnings of the French revolution and the change from

monarchy to republic.

Now suppose you were interested, like we are today, in Bastille Day, in the history of

this French national day in Australia, you might choose to download one of these articles

that you see on this front page.

If we click on this one here it’s a very small article but quite informative because

it gives us some idea about who was attending different functions for France’s national

day back in 1945 and in Sydney.

So let’s have a look at how you can download this article if it was of particular interest

to you.

All you need to do is go over to the left-hand side, click on the download button here and

as I said you can select the type of format that you’d like to download the article

to, whether that’s as an image, a PDF or as text.

The resolution of the images and text downloaded is not high and the content found here is

intended here for personal, private use and research purposes.

With that in mind let me show you here where the citation information lives.

This is very handy.

The details of this particular article and the newspaper issue generally can be found

under details.

You will first find a persistent URL in case you want to refer to the article and find

it later again or a persistent URL for the page and you will see that there are different

citation styles available.

At the very bottom you will find an option to export the citation to reference software

such as Endnote.

Lastly, en français, a little bit of text-correcting goes a long way so let’s redirect to a French

language article on this page by simply returning to the view all articles on this page option,

reset the zoom so we can see the whole page.

Let’s click on the third article we can see from the list which you can see here isn’t

so clear however we can make out in that first line ‘L’invitation formelle du President’.

Let's have a look over here on the left-hand side.

In order to text-correct all you need to do is click on the small pencil.

That will then highlight the line of text from the article that you’re about to correct

and we can see here that as I correct, L apostrophe, invitation formelle du – in this case – President.

If we click save you’ll see that it now has saved that text.

Now that I have text-corrected that small portion and I'm logged into my account here

I can click on text corrections and you’ll see that the text correction I just made is

now available for me to view in my list.

It notes here that it’s one line and I can be redirected to that article there.

But if you enjoy this comprehension exercise and want to do more you have the option to

simply return where you left off if you are logged in or you can use the persistent URL

as I showed you earlier in the detail section and that will take you back to the article

and you can make anonymous contributions there.

Bonne fête nationale et à bientôt.

We look forward to you viewing more of our discovery videos and learning more about the

National Library’s collection and the great resources we have available for you.

Thank you very much

Good afternoon, everyone, my name is Rachel and I work in Reader Services here

at the National Library.

Welcome to this Aussie Sports Hero webinar.

Before we move on I will just turn off the camera.

Okay, I’d like to begin by acknowledging the Ngunnawal and Ngambri people who are the

traditional custodians of the land on which this webinar is being held and pay respects

to their elders both past and present.

I pay my respect to the elders of other communities in Australia and extend this respect to all

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders’ people in attendance today.

Now we’ve probably all been missing our sport, myself included however today’s webinar

is not a celebration of Aussie sporting heroes as such.

Apart from having a lifelong love of many sports and having evolved into a true Canberra

Raiders fan I also have a background in cultural studies.

Sport of course plays an important role in many cultures across the world, not least

our own.

The purpose of today’s webinar is to demonstrate how our eResources can be used to undertake

social and cultural research, whether for scholarly or personal interest reasons.

Specifically I will be looking at the relationship between the representation of Aussie sporting

heroes and the Australian dream.

To put this into some context this year the Library’s theme has been Australian dreams.

This theme explores visions for the future, ideals, aspirations, goals, reminiscence or

nostalgia and reflections on who we are.

Undoubtably part of this dream narrative is the idea of Australia as a great sporting

nation.

Traditionally our sporting heroes have looked something like this.

Sir Donald Bradman who was described at a Deakin lecture by John Carroll as the embodiment

of Australian character ideal, arguably the nation’s greatest sporting hero who also

happens to be a white male cricketer.

But what about our sporting heroes who are not white, not male and/or don’t behave

like Donald Bradman?

In this webinar I want to demonstrate how you can explore the portrayal of our contemporary

sporting heroes and how this might differ to the Australian dream ideal of the great

Aussie sporting hero.To do this I have chosen to explore three case studies which I hope

will demonstrate the diversity of our modern-day sporting heroes.

These are the Australian men’s cricket team ball-tampering scandal, Adam Goodes, and women

in sport.

Now I'm sure you’ll appreciate that these topics can all be explored in depth but with

the time limitations we have I will very much just be skimming the surface of each of them

but I hope they give you a flavour of the type of research possible using our eResources

and encourages you to do more of your own searching.

Also I’d just like to reiterate that this webinar is specifically focused on our eResources,

I will not be spending time looking at the Library’s catalogue or Trove or indeed any

other specific resources which ordinarily would be very useful for this type of research.

Instead I will show how to navigate our eResources portal, give you research tips along the way

and demonstrate the great value of this service and wealth of digital resources available

to you.

As well as searching across the full text content in our portal I will also be demonstrating

some specific databases, namely NewsBank and PressReader which are excellent sources of

contemporary newspaper and magazine coverage of Australian sport.

First though a general introduction to our eResources portal.

An exciting feature of the portal is that you can easily conduct full text searches

of many of the eJournals, eBooks and more in our collection.

You can also choose to search specific databases individually.

You can access the eResources portal via the Library’s homepage which is NLA.gov.au and

then click on the eResources box just down here.

To access licensed databases and the full text content in the eResources portal from

home you will need a National Library card.

For those of you who don’t already have a Library card it is very easy to sign up.

Simply visit the Library’s homepage and click the Get a Library Card link just here

and fill out the online form to apply for a card.

If you cannot visit the Library to pick up your card we offer a complimentary mailing

service and we’ll send your card out to you to begin your research at home.

So going back to the Library’s homepage I’m now going to click on the link to the

eResources.

You’ll find that you only need to accept the terms and conditions as you enter the

site rather than each individual database and this means you can move between databases

without interruption.

To log in from home click the link at the upper centre of the eResources homepage.

You’ll be redirected to our catalogue to enter your details but will be taken back

to eResources upon logging in.

To log in you just need your user ID located on the back of your Library card and your

surname.

When using our eResources onsite like I am today there is no need to log in as you will

automatically be given access to everything the portal has to offer by just clicking the

link at the top of the page.

Now you’ll also notice some links in the top banner of the eResources homepage.

Our eResources page now links directly to our catalogue and vice versa so you can jump

back and forth between the two.

We’ve also included a link to our research guides so you can easily refer to them for

research assistance.

If you know what specific database you’re wanting to use or you want to find a database

on a particular subject go to the browse eResources tab which is just here.

Here you can refine by access level.

The Library has three different categories of eResources, those that are freely available

to anyone over the internet, licensed resources that you can access from home with your Library

card and onsite resources for which you need to be in the Library building.

For the purpose of today’s session we’ll be focusing on licensed resources which you

can use at home to conduct your research.Okay so to begin with I’m going to explore our

first case study, the Australian men’s cricket team ball-tampering scandal and to do this

I’m going to use the NewsBank Access World News database.

NewsBank is a licensed resource which includes current and historical full text newspapers

from across the globe.

It provides coverage from news resources from over 172 countries including over 600 titles

from Australia.You can find and access individual databases several ways including via the library’s

catalogue but a simple way to find a database however is via the browse eResources tab.

Here you can search for databases by either typing in keywords or the title of the database

or even the first letter of the title into the searchbox or you can browse by first letter

here.

You can also browse by topic, for example newspapers if you’re looking for newspapers

or by access conditions so for example you can browse all our licensed resources.

So to find and access NewsBank I’m just going to start typing in the title NewsBank

and it actually will pop up before I’ve even finished the title and I can click on

the link for the database here.

Now within NewsBank itself you can access an advanced search by clicking on more search

options or you can search by date or by map which allows you to refine your search by

location.

You can also search or browse through an A to Z list of all news sources found in NewsBank

by clicking on the A to Z source list up here.

When using eResources for your research you will find there is invariably an option to

conduct an advanced search however I much prefer to do a basic keyword search and then

use limiters to refine my results.

I find this method provides a wealth of relevant material to work with and can lead you to

various ideas and research which you might not originally identify.

Some keyword search advice however.

Keep updating your keywords as you go through your research, they’re only a starting point

as once you begin reading material you’ll find other terms that will be fruitful to

search as well.

Remember you can experiment with combinations of keywords too.

So to find some initial keywords I need to unpack my topic and then start with what I

know.

Now I’m sure you’re all familiar with the ball-tampering scandal when during a test

match Cameron Bancroft was caught trying to rub up one side of the ball with sandpaper

to make it swing in flight.

Captain Steve Smith and Vice Captain David Warner were found to be involved and all three

received unprecedented sanctions from Cricket Australia.

I’m interested in finding reports of the scandal to see how it might have impacted

the portrayal of Australian men’s cricket and cricketers both here in Australia and

overseas and I'm also interested in knowing if there has been any redemption since with

the sporting heroes involved and if so how and why this might have been achieved.

So some keywords which I might want to start with are Australian cricket ball-tampering.

I’m just going to put that in here and hit the search button.

Now I can see that there’s thousands of results on that search so it was obviously

fairly big news however I can also see on the left-hand side here that the results are

sorted by newest so I have articles from this month sitting at the top of my results list

and they are not necessarily the most relevant.

So I’m going to change my result list to search by best match.

Clicking on the left here and this time I get results at the top of my list which date

mainly from around the time of the incident which was 24th of March 2018.

Alternatively I can narrow my search results to focus on reports from around the time of

the scandal by using the date limiters on the left-hand side.

So I’m going to narrow my search results to those dated between the 24th and 31st of

March 2018 and if I hover over the little question mark next to date I can see that

I need to enter my date as month, day, year so I’m just going to go 24th, 2018 and 3rd

for the March and then 31, 2018 and apply that and scroll back up to the top.

So even just for that one week alone there were still nearly 3,000 results.

So if I want to read a preview of an article I can either just hover or click where it

says preview or even just hover over the article itself and a little article preview will pick

up.

So for example for the first result, We cheat at cricket, allows me just to read a little

bit more from the beginning of the article.

But if I scroll down the first page and have a look at the results I get a good idea of

the headlines and the reaction created by this event including that the Prime Minister

at the time, Malcom Turnbull, said that the nation is shocked and bitterly disappointed

over the ball-tampering incident.

I can also focus my results a little bit more by adding some new keywords so I’m just

going to add the word heroes to my search, keeping the date range the same and just see

what I come up with from that.

Here I get a bit more of a manageable list, there’s 77 results and again I can read

through the headlines to see not only the reaction in Australia but also from overseas.

Now if I want to I can tackle these set of results as two separate groups, those from

our region and those from elsewhere by using the location limiter on the left-hand side.

So for example I can click on Australia Oceania which will find both Australian and New Zealand

results.

If I want to know further I can, down to Australia or New Zealand but if I just scroll down this

first page again I get some example of the impact of the incident.

For example I can see headlines that read such as Brazen, arrogant act seals downfall

of Australian greats, Our local cricketers slam their heroes for ball-tampering disgrace,

and a bit further down, Spotlight on ball-tampering reveals bigger moral questions.

So if I like I can then clear the filter up the top here for Australian Oceania so that

we can have a look at results from other locations overseas so if I go back to the source location

and just click on more options and click all the other overseas locations here and just

apply that this is a good way of finding some outsiders’ views as well of Australia and

also its relationship with sport.

So for example if I scroll down there is a – article here from a UK paper called The

Northern Echo titled Comment: Does Australia’s reaction to the ball tampering scandal prove

it’s the greatest sporting nation on earth?

I’m just going to read a few lines from the actual article.

Australians are terrible losers, it is their fiercely competitive spirit which makes them

such daunting opponents on the field of sport.

Australians are also terrible winners, it is not enough for them to celebrate their

victories, Aussie supporters and stars seem to regard sporting triumphs as chances to

needle their vanquished foe with a form of boyish arrogance which too often crosses the

line dividing banter from bullying.

The article goes on to ask, would sporting cheats in any other country or in any other

sport be treated such a public shaming as former Captain Steve Smith who wept as he

apologised for bringing shame to a nation which welds sporting glory to its sense of

self-worth?

So not only does this article contain some interesting content but I’ll also use this

chance to point out that as with most databases there are various options available to you

for managing individual pieces of content.

So for articles in NewsBank you can find options above the title of the article which allow

you to do such things as sighting, emailing, printing, downloading, saving to your folder

and also copying the link, getting the permalink.

You can also choose to change the size of the font or have the article read to you.

But for now I’m just going to head back to our results using the back to results command

here and I’m quickly going to investigate if there’s been any redemption for the players

involved in the scandal.

Firstly I’m going to clear all my filters using the clear filters command up at the

top here and I’m going to replace the word heroes with redemption.

Now also I’m going to change my results from best match to newest using the filter

here on the left as I’m really interested in how the cricketers are currently being

portrayed.

If I scroll down a little I can see some interesting results including Sandpaper and sobbing: Two

years on from Australian cricket’s darkest hour, Story of the good men in Baggy Greens

and Slow road to redemption.

Now several of these articles discuss an eight-episode web series called Test which documents the

redemption of the players and the Australian cricket side over a period of 18 months after

the ball-tampering incident.

If I open the Sandpaper and sobbing article which is from The Independent newspaper the

author, George Sessions, writes, that the scandal would be a watershed moment for the

Aussies where the mindset shifted from win at all costs to trying to do things the right

way.

The author mentions that not all the players involved for fully redeem themselves however

as he goes on to say, it has been a completely different story for Smith who’s enjoyed

a sensational 12 months and will be the star for 2019 Ashes, proven to be an almost immovable

object for England bowlers.

It was during the 50 over World Cup where the former Captain made his return to the

international scene alongside Warner.

The pair were booed initially but Smith’s batting exploits would soon turn jeers to

applause from English crowds.

So maybe winning at all costs is no longer part of Australian cricket culture but instead

winning modestly is the key to redemption and appreciation.

But these reports of the scandal in relation to Australian cricket culture and how this

might have changed over the last couple of years gives me some new keywords I can try

so for example I could try a search on Australian cricket as a phrase and the keywords culture

and sandpaper.

But hopefully by using some new keywords I will find some results which help to contextualise

the information I have already found.

However before I leave this topic for good I would just recap on the searches, how they

have changed while I was researching ball-tampering scandal.

So initially we had a search for Australian cricket ball-tampering, I then added the word

heroes to combine some new keywords and gain some more specific results.

We next had Australian cricket ball-tampering redemption which was really just changing

the keywords to get some other types of results and then Australian cricket as a phrase with

culture sandpaper which is combining some new keywords and phrases which have come up

during my research so far.

So now I’m going to head back to the eResources portal and move onto Adam Goodes, the first

nations AFL star.

Now I could find lots of really useful information on Goodes in NewsBank but I want to use this

opportunity to show you how to search across the eResources portal which allows you to

conduct full text searches of many of our databases.

At this stage approximately 75% of our online content is full text searchable and we’re

working to improve this even more.

Once again to begin I need to start by unpacking my case study and identify some keywords.

Attention has recently returned to Adam Goodes with the screening of two documentaries, one

titled The Final Quarter and the other, The Australian Dream.

Both retell the controversy which began with an incident during the 2013 indigenous round

AFL match when Goodes asked security to remove a 13-year-old girl spectator who had called

him an ape.

I’d like to investigate whether this incident and what happened afterwards highlights cracks

in certain aspects of the Australian dream and whether it sheds light on the portrayal

of our non-white Aussie sporting heroes.

Again I’ll only be demonstrating how to get started with this research and I’m very

much just scratching the surface.

I can begin by searching some keyword terms in eResources portal to see what I come up

with.

Again to get the most out of the eResources portal I will need to change or modify my

original keywords over time but to begin with I am just going to search on the phrase, Adam

Goodes.

Now I can see that there’s a fair amount of results there so I’m definitely going

to have to refine my list.

Before I do, though, I’m going to open one of the results to show you how easy it is

to access this material.

I can see that several of my results are available as full text.

I know this because it states full text both in the results list and the time records and

it’s important to take note of this because our portal does also return results for just

citations as well as full text content.

So to see the full text content I just need to click on the PDF full text which I’m

going to do for the result, A race to the goal from the Metro magazine.

So in this case I’ve just opened it up in my current tab but alternatively I could have

chosen to right click on the link and open the article in a new tab.

I’m just going to scroll down a bit, it’s going to take a little while to load because

it is a PDF with a lot of photographs.

We’ll just scroll down.

This article basically discusses the two recent films on Goodes as do several of my search

results.

It also provides more information about the incident, why the public reaction and what

it all might have meant and as the author, Travis Johnson, writes, the final act of the

sporting career of Adam Goodes served as a vocal point for a – well the polite term

would be discussion about racism, not just on the footy oval but in Australian society

and culture as a whole.

Following the incident Goodes became the subject of increasing hostility from both game day

crowds and public commentators and after enduring a campaign of abuse that included being loudly

and repeatedly booed at seemingly every game he played during the 2015 season Goodes announced

his retirement from football in September that year.

Johnson goes on to say, the broader discord around what is generally referred to as the

booing controversy was prolonged and often heated with pundits on both sides of the political

divide ruminating on the meaning of it all.

Was it racist?

Was it even about race?

Who gets to decide that it is?

Did Goodes comport himself with dignity or was he, as was averred by many of his critics,

a poor sportsman who was performing for sympathy just as he allegedly performed for free kicks

on the field?

Johnson continues, this rigamarole has proven fertile ground for factual filmmakers with

Goodes, thanks to his reputation as one of the most esteemed players of our national

sport, serving as a lightning rod for uncomfortable contentions about race in modern Australia.

The author contends that the pair of films viewed together provide a more complete and

nuanced understanding of Goodes, his position in our society and what the events of his

final years as a professional footballer can tell us about our attitudes to race, respect

and success.

So there’s a fair bit there to work on but for the moment I’m going to go back to our

results list just using the command here on the top left and move to refine my list a

little bit more.

I can do this by using the limiters on the left-hand side here.

I can see under format that there are a lot of results from news sources.

This is not surprising and as I want to examine the portrayal of Goodes that are most likely

relevant to my research so for now I’m just going to click on the news format button there

and if I wished I could narrow my results further by publication if I scroll down here

and choose one of those that’s there.

Or if click on show more I can also see that there’s all these other news publications

that are part of my search results.

I can also if I want narrow my search by content provider so bearing in my mind that I'm on

news at the moment there’s NewsBank which we were looking at earlier and if I click

on that that will bring up results from NewsBank.

These results include a link for full text from NewsBank and for most of NewsBank’s

results you can click on the link and be taken directly to the full text content of the article

which is a very useful feature.

However you may also get results from material in NewsBank to which the Library does not

have access.

This is rare and it tends not to apply for newspaper titles as such.

So an example is material sourced from the ABC and we’re currently working on gaining

access to the full text of these results.

It's important to remember that you can change what limiters you’ve applied to your search

as you go so here I’m just going to uncheck the NewsBank limiter and I'm going to have

a closer look at the subject limiters for our search.

Now I can click on show more again as I did before to see all the subject headings but

I’ve noticed there’s a subject here for Adam Goodes himself which reduces my results

to a more manageable number.

But it’s important to remember when limiting by subject that not all of our content has

actually been assigned a subject heading yet.

I can see for example that there are no news results when using this subject heading and

this is because the content from NewsBank as well as some other providers that we have

have not actually been assigned subject headings in our portal.

So for now I’m actually just going to remove the subject heading for Adam Goodes.

Now if I’m only wanting to see Australian content I can refine by geography using the

limiter down here or instead if I wanted to look at overseas content I could just refine

it that way to overseas.

I can only refine it by date range up the top here, by subject which we’ve covered

and also language and more.

It’s worth experimenting with these limiters too to see what different results are suggested.

Another way of refining my search of course is to add different or additional keywords

so for example I could add the word, hero and see what we get.

Okay so it looks like there’s some potentially interesting and useful articles here For example

my Adam Goodes is a hero for our times which is from The Age and it was written just after

he retired.

In this article the author, Tim Dick, acknowledges the treatment Goodes received after calling

out racism and interestingly praises Goodes for demonstrating qualities which are reminiscent

of our traditional Donald Bradman-type sporting hero.

To give you an idea of what I mean I’ll quote one section.

He played masterfully on the field, he serves well off it.

He doesn’t show off.

He is unlike what we see from too many of Australia’s sportsmen, full of hubris, too

big for their boots and revelling in quick praise for modest records.

Not Goodes, he is an example to those like Nick Kyrgios and the Australian men’s cricket

team, he proves that modesty remains both honourable and popular.

He lives the motto, actions, not words.

He is a proud indigenous man, an inspiration to all Australia.

So without analysing this passage too much I think the author is speaking to one of our

underlying sporting hero narratives, one which emphasises the importance of modesty and of

actions speaking louder than words.

His argument concurs neatly with the previous story around Steve Smith’s redemption which

emphasised the importance of winning modestly.

The author contends that those sporting heroes who live up to this enduring image will be

celebrated.

However certainly Goodes was not celebrated nor revered by everyone so other narratives

must also have been at work and if I go back to my results list using my command just here

there’s one other article that I wanted to look at which is The two stories of Adam

Goodes and it’s taken from the Eureka Street Journal.

In this article you might be able to get some idea of what other narratives were at play.

As the author states in here Goodes was outspoken on racial issues, calling out racist remarks

whether they were made by club presidents or people in the stands.

This provoked the ire of those who didn’t like their sport being politicised and perhaps

didn’t like their racist attitudes being challenged.

So perhaps challenging us, making us feel uncomfortable does not fit the traditional

narrative of the Aussie sporting hero, particularly if those doing the challenging sit outside

the mainstream ideal of the white Anglo male sporting hero.

If I click on the detailed record link just here on the left of the article I can also

find some other subjects, terms which I might find useful to search on such as racism in

sports which can help to further contextualise my research so far.

So hopefully now you have an idea of how to build and refine your search within the eResources

portal but before we move on there are a couple of other things I’d like to quickly show

you.

Firstly how to organise your content.

So if I go back to the result list as a starter so I’ve started to identify material that

is of interest to me but rather than looking at the content in each record I can create

a smaller creative group of resources by clicking on the little folder icon to the right of

the item record just here.

I’ll save a couple more to my group.

Now to see all these saved items together in my personalised list I can click on the

folder view link on the right-hand side and there they are.

Now I’ve done this using the onsite version of eResources which logs you in as a general

Library user.

This means that upon leaving this Library computer at the end of today’s session these

groups will be lost.

This doesn’t matter so much if you’re planning to do all your research and reading

in one go but for most of us that isn’t always the case.

Luckily there is an option to create a specific profile for yourself that will remember your

saved groups and keep them safe for returning to another day.

The profile you will need to create to do this is separate to your Library card login,

in fact it’s a profile with EBSCO, the provider with whom we collaborated to create this portal.

In creating this EBSCO program you’ll be able to not only access your saved groups

within the Library but also remotely so you can research at home.

Now to create this EBSCO login simply click on the sign into my EBSCO host link at the

top and create your profile.

I’m now going to sign in with my profile details and show you what it looks like.

So I think those are all saved, we’ll try that.

Okay, this is where you can get a bit creative with how you organise your content.

If you are just beginning your research you could group all your chosen material under

one folder.

If you’re further into your research and have started to notice common threads amongst

your material you might like to create and name some new folders.

If you would like further help with this EBSCO folder management you can click on the small

question mark bubble just here to learn more.

So now we’ve talked about organising content on a broader level, the collection of content,

I'm going to go back to my search results and open one of the records.

So we can look very quickly at how to manage individual pieces of content through each

item record.

So I will just open up this one here.

So on the right-hand side there are a variety of features which allow you to sight the article,

print the email, save, export to a bibliography or you can access the permalink to the article

here.

Permalinks are very important as they are the guaranteed method of finding your way

back to a specific record or page.

If you’re documenting your research these are also the links you need to use in your

bibliography as they will provide access to your future readers.

Additionally our eResources portal will generate a variety of citation styles for you dependent

on what you’re after.

So for now I’m going to move on to my last case study, women in sport.

For generations our sporting heroes have been predominantly men.

Here I want to look at the increasing exposure of women in sport in Australia and whether

this is impacting on our ideas of Aussie sporting heroes.

Within this framework I want to look at whether increased exposure of women in sport and the

changing nature of their participation has changed Australia’s notion of a sporting

hero or whether deeper cultural aspects still need to be addressed.

Again this topic could be researched extensively but instead in the time we have left available

I’m going to show you, using some basic searching, another of our databases, namely

PressReader.

PressReader not only allows you to search across a wide range of newspapers and magazines

but you can also browse specific titles, displaying them in their original format, layout and

language.

Titles are archived in their original format for three months only but individual articles

dating from approximately 2003 onwards can also be searched and viewed in PressReader.

So I’m going to click on new search and I’m going to go back into the browse eResources

tab and search for PressReader just by typing it in here again as we did before for NewsBank

and there’s PressReader.

So let’s dive in.

As this is a database in which I can browse full issues of magazines and newspapers in

their original format for the past three months I’m going to start my search by simply browsing

some representations of women in sport.

To do this I’m going to choose Australia publications so choosing from the countries

list on the left and then I’m going to scroll down the categories on the left-hand side

and pick sports.

Now I think you can see from the results that there are not too many representations of

women in this list of titles.

A couple relate to women in sport but the vast majority include only male representations,

on their covers at least.

If we go back to where we started and we pick sports from down the bottom we

can actually see coverage worldwide and I think you’ll see that the trend is not really

something that is unique to Australia.

There’s mainly male representations there as well.

But now I'm going to do some searching across the PressReader database which will allow

me to find articles dating back several years rather than just the last three months.

I’m going to go back to the homepage and I’m going to just put some basic keywords

in the search box which is up here on the top right-hand side and to start with I’m

just going to put in women sport heroes.

Now this gives me a very large number of results.

Before I go any further I am just going to limit them to Australian publications by clicking

on advanced search, going to publications here and choosing Australia and going save

and then search.

But again I still have a lot of results and a lot of them don’t look very relevant and

this is really because I’m searching on some very generic, heavily used words across

a single database containing newspapers and magazines and these words pop up a lot in

the TV guides.

So in order to get some more meaningful results I need to search on some keyword phrases and

I’m going to do this by clicking in the search box in the top right and I’m going

to go to advanced search and I'm going to change my search tier to women’s sport as

a phrase and putting heroes as a phrase.

Now another search I could have tried at this point is women in sport as a phrase and the

keyword heroes.

I’m just going to try that for the moment.

Now I have a much smaller set of results.

I can see on the left-hand side, I can either look at my custom results which are those

from Australia or if I wanted I could look at overseas results or all publications from

choosing the in all publications bit there.

I can click on a result to view the whole article but before I do I’m just going to

point out the three vertical dots which you can see to the right of the articles’ titles

in this corner here.

If you click on those dots it gives you access to various functions such as page view which

allows you to see the original format if the article dates within the last three months

as well as listen to the article, copy, share or print.

But the first article that I’m going to have a look at is We are gladiators: the elite

athletes looking to raise the profile of women’s sport which provides some insight into how

and why women in sport are trying to raise their profile.

The article from The Guardian dating from January 2019 discusses the Women in Sport

Photo Actions Awards which aims to capture images showcasing the skills, strength and

athleticism of sportswomen in action and to combat the traditional stereotyping of the

female body image.

The project hopes to change the portrayal of female athletes from smiling stationary

models to tough, fit competitors, role models, heroes and leaders.

It also aims to increase the visibility of women’s sport with Minjee Lee, the Australian

women’s golfer, saying that for generations our sporting heroes have been predominantly

men because they have the exposure.

Another example of an article I might look at is where have Australia’s male sporting

heroes gone which actually asks the question, do we even have an Australian male sporting

hero anymore?

Written by Stephen Ganavas the article states, that Australian sporting culture does not

exist in a vacuum, it is a byproduct of wider cultural trends in this country.

This includes but is not limited to the boys’ club culture in men’s team sports resulting

in the win at all costs mentality.

He goes on to say the numerous drug, alcohol and sex scandals that continue to plague men’s

sports are indicative of the underbelly of toxic masculinity which permeates through

it.

The author then discusses how female athletes are stepping up and filling the voids vacated

by their male counterparts with likeable female athletes providing genuine role models with

star power for girls and boys.

Another one I might look at is A sporting chance?

I don’t think so which discusses the rising profile of Australian women’s sports whilst

also highlighting the inequality still faced by women regarding pay and conditions.

The article from The Daily Examiner dates from 2015 when the female soccer team, The

Matildas, ranked ninth in the world fought for a pay rise from 21,000 per annum, one-fifteenth

of their male counterparts’ wage, to $34,000.

As a follow-on to this in November last year The Matildas finally achieved a new pay deal

that has gone a long way in achieving equal pay for male and female soccer players here

in Australia.

However although both men and women now receive 40% of tournament match payments there is

still some way to go to achieve pay parity as tournament match payments are currently

significantly higher for men than women.

Now if I want to find out more about the gender pay gap in sport I can try a new search by

clicking in my search box here and I’m going to go with the women’s sport and change

the second phrase to gender pay gap and search on that.

Just scrolling along and looking at the search results there I can see tags on other keywords

which I could pursue further for my research such as women’s rights, human rights, discrimination

and feminism.

Something else that I might want to examine in this whole case study is the portrayal

of women in individual sports.

Women are increasingly participating in sports which have historically been strongly associated

with masculinity.

As an example the first season of Australia’s national Australian Rules football league

for female players began in 2017.

Throughout the history of Australian sport there have been many images which have triggered

debate about broader social issues.

One which did just that was the photo of Tayla Harris kicking the opening goal during an

AFL women’s match in 2019 which has come to be known simply as The Kick.

The photo triggered a wave of misogynistic abuse on social media and was followed by

condemnation of the online trolls.

If I want to research this incident and the debate which followed I can search PressReader

with the words, Tayla Harris, which I’ll just put in and we’ll change that phrase

to The Kick.

I can see that there are over 300 results over here with 200 from Australia which is

fairly substantial.

I can see articles which reveal that Harris has recently written her biography, More Then

A Kick including one from The Western Australian here dating from May this year.

If I click on the three vertical dots and on page view I can see it in the original

layout which is just there.

If I go back to my search results I can also see articles about the bronze statue that

was unveiled in Melbourne in September 2019 which immortalises Harris’ kick including

one from The Bulletin which is titled Tayla Gets the Kick Out of Statue.

Here Harris basically says the following about the statue, it doesn’t matter if you’re

a man or a woman, young or old, everyone has a right to do what they love.

That’s what I want people to see when they look at this.So before I leave this particular

topic I’m just going to recap on the keywords that came up in my research in PressReader

as I went along.

So again to start with we had women sport heroes which was a very basic beginning with

some very broad keywords then followed by women’s sport and sporting heroes, combining

two keyword phrases.

At that point we could have also tried women in sport as a phrase with the word heroes.

Then we moved on to women’s sport gender pay gap using some new keywords that had come

up during my research so far.

At that point we come to the end of our session today.

I hope that going through these steps has given you an idea of how our eResources can

greatly assist you with your research, whatever your passions.

I hope that by using three case studies I have shown you how to best navigate and utilise

the portal as well as how you can investigate individual databases, particularly for primary

resources such as newspapers and magazines which can be so important for cultural research.

Finally if you need any help with our eResources portal there are a number of help guides and

an introductory video to assist you with navigating this service.

You can find all of these on the eResources homepage via the help tab.

If you need any further assistance at all you can always use Ask a Librarian.

So thank you, everyone, today for listening and happy researching, everyone.

Welcome.

My name is Damian Cole and with me, Amy Ramires, and we are reference librarians in the Reader

Services branch here at the National Library of Australia.

We’re here to talk to you about using the Library’s collections to research the history

of a place, the local history of a place, what we have in the collections and how to

go about using and accessing them.

I’ll just turn the camera off now so we can actually get into the presentation.

As a quick overview of what we’ll talk through today we’ll show you the variety of materials

available across the Library collections that can be used to find the history of a place

or a location, a town, a city, a suburb or a region.

Some of this may be predictable if you’ve used the Library before, particularly if you’ve

already done some research of your own history of your place already but some I hope may

be surprising and enlightening.

We’ll go through how to find items in the collection with some guidance on catalogue

searching, how to use the Library collections both at home and here in the Library reading

rooms.

One thing to say is that we’ll not be specifically looking at family history.

Family history is of course bound up in the history of a place, the history of people

living in that place and it may be that people are your primary interest of your research.

There are a whole range of resources of full family research and indeed it’s probably

the biggest single use of the Library’s collections though it is quite specialised

and can be complex.

The sorts of methods and materials we’ll be talking about will be a way to get to the

stories of families and people by getting to the story of their place, where and how

they lived.

We offer several separate learning program webinars like this focusing on family history

so I suggest you have a look at the Library’s YouTube channel and learning program calendar

for more.

The key place to start is where your place of interest is.

For me, being Canberra born and bred, this is my local place here and so the place that

I’ve researched and am familiar with.

We will use some examples of different resources we have on local history but only as an example

of the sort of resources we have at the Library and online.

For your place the range of materials and how to find and use them will be much the

same, just insert the name of your place that you want to find the history of, insert whatever

name we may be referring to as an example.

We will have varying materials on different places, maybe more or maybe less but to start

searching is the way to find out.

We want to show you with various places and examples the range of likely materials and

resources we have on the history of a place, to find the story of a place and that then

can be your place to search for.

The Library has a collection of more than just books, the collection includes imagery,

music, spoken words, objects, digital resources and more on all manner of subjects and through

this presentation we’ll show you the range of what the Library has, how to use it and

an idea of what sort of local stories you can find in this.

So to the materials in our collections starting with printed collections.

The first and obvious, books are the core of the Library collections as you would expect.

The Library has some six million books in the collection and continues to collect current

publications from Australia under the Legal Deposit Scheme that requires any book published

in Australia to be deposited in the Library.

These include ongoing publications such as journals, periodicals, magazines and newspapers

and these are increasingly being collected in a digital format.

For what we collect today some 30% of single title books and 70% of regularly published

periodicals are in a digital format.

The books are probably the best place to start researching the history of a place.

These include things such as histories and general works, biographies, government publications

and heritage reports.

family histories or books on the lives of significant personalities in a place, publications

by local historical societies including their journals and newsletters and books on community

groups and commercial businesses.

They include publications contemporary to the events of the past written by those who

actually lived through that history and transient publications that are a rich source for local

histories such as phone and business directories, the White and Yellow Pages and also even consider

fiction books set in the place that give an idea of how it was to live in that place at

that time.

But as any good librarian would say libraries are more than just books.

The National Library has a large collection of many varied formats, information presented

in all forms.

If there’s one thing I’d really like to take away from this presentation it is the

National Library and indeed any library is more than just books.

These different formats can be used to find different and unexpected stories or present

different sides to the one story and we want to take you through these different formats.

The Manuscripts Collection contains the unpublished and personal diaries, journals, letters, notebooks

and literary drafts.

We aim to collect papers and records of individuals and organisations that reflect the diversity

of Australian society, culture and environments.

It includes papers of people from ordinary settlers and workers to government and city

officials, writers and other creators and records of organisations such as community

groups, social clubs, business and enthusiast groups.

Manuscripts can tell the personal story by those who lived it.

Manuscript collections can be small, maybe just one folder of documents or very large,

perhaps hundreds of boxes.

The largest personal collection we hold is the papers of Sir Robert Menzies, over 500

boxes covering his life and career.

The archival nature of manuscripts, personal and unpublished can make using manuscripts

challenging so just be ready to spend a bit of time on them but I’m sure it will be

worth it.

All manuscript collections are catalogued, the details within them are often not.

Large collections have finding aids like a listing of the contents of the boxes.

Many finding aids are viewable online linked from a catalogue record for that collection,

others are in paper format and available here in the Library’s reading rooms.

But if not viewable online you can always ask us to email a copy of a finding aid to

you.

Do ask for assistance in using manuscript collections.

There are issues such as access conditions and copyright and fragile materials may complicate

things but they are probably one of our best used and I think most useful collections.

Some examples of the spread of things in manuscripts, it includes the papers of the personal such

as a collection of 15 letters written by Thomas Hampton to his brother during his travels

around the Victorian goldfields in 1850s, ‘60s, ‘70s.

They tell of life on the goldfields and methods of mining and farming and of his success or

lack of it.

Extremes of weather and other things he experienced from around Maryborough, Ararat and Carisbrook.

He says the general state of the colony is prosperous with plenty of gold-getting but

he also believed that wine production would soon become an important thing for the region

and so a great insight into one person’s view of their place.

There are also papers of the professional such as the records of Burnima and Bibbenluke

Stations.

Nearly 40 boxes of papers covering the operations of these two pastoral stations in the Monaro

region of southern New South Wales from 1888 to 1915, the collection includes letterbooks,

financial records, diaries, station ledgers and business correspondence.

Although they may seem dry financial records they tell the story of business and life on

the land in a way that was so common at the turn of 20th century Australia written by

those who lived there and worked the stations.

Also a wonderful way to combine it, the papers of both the professional and the everyday

such as the papers of Charles Studdy Daley.

With a 40-year career in government Daley was one of the most significant public servants

in the early development of Canberra as the capital city.

He was also a keen musician in his personal time.

This collection shows how the personal likes of a professional of such interests can start

their own stories.Amongst documents and letters on the development of the Canberra site as

the capital and pamphlets on town planning are records that Daley created and collected

on the Canberra Musical Society of which he was President for 20 years.

Things such as meeting minutes, member files, concert programs and reviews.

This tells the story of how inhabitants of Canberra lived and played in the growing city,

the social life of the city and this can be a central part of the life of that place.

Taking the Daly collection as an example can show family history can be explored through

the local history through our manuscripts collection.

In the Musical Society member files are the names of some of my family living in Canberra

in the 1930s and ‘40s.

Although the collection is not in itself a likely family history resource, and I have

no relation to Charles Daley myself, but I find part of my family in the collection and

can imagine my family living in Canberra going to concerts, enjoying the music and it seems

on at least one occasion being late with their membership dues.

This can show that a local history and then a family history can appear in a resource

you may not first think of looking in.

The papers of the person will tell the story of their life and where they lived and so

who else lived there so do think broadly for your local history research, not just in the

obvious resources you may think of first.

I’ll now hand over to Amy to continue talking through our collections.

AMY: Thank you, Damian.

So pictures are a handy resource when researching the history of a place.

Our pictures collection holds around one million photographs and artworks which document aspects

of Australian life, society, personalities and events.

Examples include portraits of individuals, images of landscapes and structures, political

cartoons and imagery of everyday life.

So I guess this poses the question, why do we collect these items and how does our collecting

differ from that of an art gallery?

Our collection of pictures is for their documentary value and not about aesthetics or artistic

value.

We do collect images from prominent artists, of course but most of our collection is based

on ordinary individuals documenting their own life experiences and their surroundings.

We also collect contemporary photographs that document today’s places, events and people

and this is done in a variety of ways whether by commission or donation.

A large portion of the Pictures Collection is digitised and viewable online and those

that aren’t can be viewed here at the Library in our Special Collections Reading Room.

So relevant to today’s discussion pictures assist us by giving an image to a story, they

show the place you are researching as it was and how it has developed so I’m going to

take you through a few examples of the types of imagery we have in our collection.

So a key purpose of the Pictures Collection is to document a changing landscape over time

to show how a place has grown and changed.

So we have a wide range of photographs of locations, scenes and buildings from around

the country and one of these wider-ranging formed collections in the Library is the Ledger

Collection.

It contains around 421 photographs which includes album prints from various photographers and

of course his own work.

The photos were taken between 1858 and 1910 in Victoria, New South Wales, Tasmania and

South Australia.

Ledger was a town planning consultant who eventually became a lecturer in town and regional

planning.

He made extensive use of the photographs to show how Australian cities and towns have

changed.

Most of the photographs in the collection are of public buildings and streets and cities

and towns such as the Royal Engineers’ Office but there are also natural landscapes depicted

in the collection such as Lavender Bay here in Sydney Harbour.

Definitely not how it looks today but it’s just an example of how these places have changed

over time.

So local photographers are important as they create a large bank of photographs documenting

a specific place.

So one of these examples is the Mandurama Collection which is a collection of over 3,000

photographs of people and daily life around Mandurama and the central New South Wales

region at the start of the 20th century.

These photographs were captured by Evan Antoni Lumme and possibly his wife, Rose.

Many of the figures that are depicted in the collection remain unidentified but also this

collection is an invaluable source for seeing parts of Australia during the Victorian and

post-federation eras with few of these types of collections of this size surviving to this

day.

Another collection I’ll mention is the Jeff Carter so Jeff Carter was a freelance photographer

and journalist who was self-proclaimed as the photographer of the poor and the unknown.

There are over 600 photographs in this collection with most of the photos being individuals

who had recorded oral history interviews with him.

There are photographs of sceneries and cities and regional towns in most of the states and

territories and Jeff is widely regarded as one of Australia’s most influential documentary

photographers as his span of photographs has created a significant visual record of Australian

life.

So artworks, while allowing a more imaginative expression of place, are also helpful for

helping us understand a picture how it once was.

This could be especially helpful for places that no longer exist at this current time.

So Glenelg Hotel and the flagstaff by John Michael Skipper.

So John Michael Skipper was an artist and also a solicitor and he was known for having

a natural skill and painted various scenes in South Australia and the goldfields in Victoria.

His sketches and paintings of built and natural environments have been credited as holding

great artistic and historical value.

But I also wanted to bring your attention to an artwork that links to the Thomas Hampton

letters Damian mentioned before.

This sketch is of the Mt Alexander goldfields and while this isn’t an area that is connected

to Hampton’s story it reflects on how we can use multiple formats to tell us the same

story.

So doing a comparative analysis of different formats allows us to understand the same place

in different ways so connecting a written description of a past time to a more visual

description of place.

Of course our national collection is just that, a national documentation of the varied

lives of our nation’s people.

So our collection of portraits and documentation and events across the country must try to

reflect this diversity.

Alongside oral history interviews, which I’ll be talking about in a few moments, we also

have a collection of individual portraits from those who have been interviewed.

So Bob Gebhardt is one of these individuals.

Gebhardt recalls his life as a drover and his early days in Broken Hill in New South

Wales.

He speaks about this relationships with his Aboriginal and Afghan mates and co-workers

and his worker as a master welder of international standing.

Portraits of individuals can connect us to place through the people they are depicting

such as understanding prominent industries and the area.

But our collection also holds photographs of events in the life of a place from the

ceremonial to the everyday.

One of the photos I have depicted here is a group of people in a semiformal attire at

an event in Newcastle.

So the picture reflects a few things.

This picture is part of a newspaper photographs archive, The Newcastle Morning Herald and

The Miner’s Advocate archive.

So it depicts the importance of these archives in telling everyday stories.

Another thing that I want to point out is many of our photos such as this one are of

unknown subjects so many subjects in our collection remain unidentified.

We’re constantly searching to improve our descriptions of collection material so if

you can establish who they are or where they are in these photographs definitely get in

contact with us and we can improve our descriptions and that in turn will assist future researchers

and would be immensely valuable.

Okay so moving on to maps and the collection that I feel has the most to say about local

places and history.

So our maps collection in total includes around one million maps which includes different

types highlighting topographic surveys, land ownership, design and development, road and

tourist maps and also mapping from the air.

The range of maps we hold spans from European maps and their assumption of a great southern

land mass up to the satellite and digital datasets that are being produced today.

So maps gives us a complete picture of the layout of the landscape and how people have

lived on the land.

They give us a sense of place to a story and gives us a physical way to show that place.

So many of our maps in our collection are fully digitised online and can be downloaded

from Trove.

The different maps we’ll be talking about are all covered in more depth in our online

research guides as well so if you’re finding you’re having difficulties finding relevant

maps in our collection or just want to understand them a bit better then they are an excellent

resource to go to.

A well known and key resource for understanding local history and family history are land

ownership maps, typically referred to as cadastral or parish maps.

These are considered a strength of the Library’s map collection mostly due to the amount of

parish maps we hold but coverage and dates do vary between different states.

Recently the Library has undergone a project which aims to digitise these cadastral and

parish maps.

Thousands of maps from New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland have been digitised and placed

online and these days also run by a similar system so they're separated by counties and

then subdivided into parishes.

So for the ACT, South Australia, Western Australia, Tasmania and Northern Territory they all have

varying systems that they use.

This is especially the case for South Australia, Northern Territory and WA as not all of the

states are separated into counties, parishes or hundreds with this separating concentrated

to the higher populated areas.

Wikipedia has some handy pages which talks through how land was divided across Australia

and the differing systems each state and territory used.

If you’re also looking for more detailed deposited plans of towns and suburbs these

can be found through the relevant land registry department of your state and territory.

For example in New South Wales that would be the Land Registry Services and their Historical

Land Record Viewer which is online.

So land sales plans so these are posters advertising blocks of land or sites for sale for a variety

of reasons, whether it be commercial or personal.

These can include sales that did occur or plans that didn’t progress any further.

So these posters can be used as early evidence for prices of blocks of land, its boundaries

and past built environments and any eventual changes to the roads or land usages.

The National Library holds around 100,000 land sales plans in the collection.

Most of our collection records the auctions of eastern Australia from around the 1840s

to the 1930s.

I guess the most known function of maps, and one that should come to no surprise, is that

maps highlight the physical landscape of the land as it once was and how it has changed.

So topographic maps both highlight the natural and manmade environments of a place.

So the Library holds around 200,000 post 1990s Australian topographic maps which have been

published by both national and state mapping and surveying authorities.

So I’m going to switch over to Trove just to highlight the differences between these

two topographic maps.

So one of them is a 1976 version which is highlighted here and the other is from 1989

so there’s just over 10 years’ difference between the two.

So I’ll start with 1976 so as you can see all the vineyards around here, there’s quite

a few of them, still lots of grassy areas along here and a big pine plantation up the

top.

So not a lot of urban development going on, it’s still quite a natural landscape and

we jump over to 1989 and you can already see all these built-up areas starting to form

here where it once was grassy and a natural landscape.

Very lightly you can see the size of some vineyards shrinking over on this side here.

But another thing I will point out is that icons in maps do change over time so while

in the 1976 version the pine plantations are noted with this area prominent dark green

icon, that completely changes in the 1989 version where it’s more of a light green.

So it's pretty important to just bear in mind those differences that can occur in maps.

So I’ll just go back to the PowerPoint now and we’ll move on to aerial photography.

So the Maps Collection includes aerial photography conducted by the Commonwealth Government for

surveying and planning purposes for the 1930s to the 1980s.

All Australian states are represented in our collection including Papua New Guinea and

Antarctica which amounts to around 800,000 photographs.

The aerial photography is a perfect way to see the growth of the cities and towns and

changes to the landscape.

They were used by city planners and other professions such as environmental resource

management, ecology, archaeology and the military.

Unfortunately, most of this collection is only viewable at the Library but flight diagrams

are available online through Geoscience so you can figure out what series of aerial photographs

will show the area you want.

So a supporting resource that researchers find key in using maps are gazetteers.

Think of it like a geographical directory.

These are often used in conjunction with maps because of the explicit written detail they

go into about a specific place.

Older gazetteers include information about its location, latitude and longitude, the

geographical profile of the place, the main industries and commerce, the population count

and even things like how regular the post deliveries are.The origin of the locality’s

name is also an important bit of information that gets mentioned in these guides.

But changing or variant placenames can be a confusing thing when researching a place

so examples of some placename changes in the past include Darwin which was once known as

Palmerston, many placenames in South Australia during world war one as they were of German

origin.

So I thought I’d also mention that the Bailliere’s New South Wales gazetteer for 1866 is digitised

online through Library of Congress so that is also a handy guide to go to if you can’t

make it onsite and view these in person.

So moving on to oral history and folklore our oral history interviews document life

stories from people across Australia with different and somewhat similar stories relating

to our cultural, intellectual and social aspects of life.

Our earliest interviews date back to the 1950s but can discuss events decades before that.

Our interviews can be a part of a project focusing around a unified thing or they can

be singular.

Oral histories are a detailed oral picture of a place through reminiscence and can also

be a chance to hear about details of places that are underrepresented in the historical

record.

So many of our interviews are available to listen to online and have written transcripts.

As these collections could hold sensitive information they might also have access conditions

so you will need to contact us if that is the case.

Some might be available for access by getting written permission but some might not be accessible

for the interviewee’s lifetime.

So I just wanted to point out really quickly a few of the prominent collections so Wendy

Lowenstein’s 1930s depression collection so this collection comprises of 172 tapes

of recollections of life during the depression in the 1930s and these were recorded by Lowenstein

in 1972 to 1976.

Around 68 of these interviews are available online.

The interviewees all lived in all the states and included bagmen, shearers, station hands,

canecutters, builders, plumbers, a whole range of occupations.

Some of the examples of specific place descriptions relate to land prices during the depression,

the rising popularity of places due to low rents and the origins of particular stores

in townships.

I also point out the Drovers oral history project so this is a collection of around

140 interviews with around 25 of them available online.

Most interviewees lived in Queensland and the recordings were made in Charters Towers,

Mt Isa, Cloncurry, Emerald, McKay, Bundaberg and there were also other recordings made

in Alice Springs, Adelaide and Canberra.

So onto newspapers.

Newspapers are an effective form of detailing local history as they discuss stories at the

time they are happening.

Local newspapers are an important source of information on any town or city as they document

events that occurred in that place as well as people that lived there.

The National Library’s collection holds the major daily newspapers as well as reginal,

local and community newspapers.

So most Australian newspapers pre-1955 are digitised on Trove, after this it can get

tricky as to whether you can find newspapers online or if they can only be viewed onsite

at a library.

For newspapers not on Trove and for post-1955 papers these are most likely on microfilm

and print.

Microfilm is the preferred method for viewing these papers as they are more robust than

the typical newspaper.

For newspapers around the 1990s onwards newspapers can be accessed through our subscribed online

databases such as NewsBank and the Australian New Zealand Reference Centre.

These can be accessed at home by logging in with your library card but this’ll be discussed

in a few moments by Damian.

The National Library has presented other learning programs focusing on newspapers which will

provide more in-depth information.

This section was just to give you a brief overview of how newspapers document local

history and a brief overview on the different ways you can access newspapers in our collection.

So now I'm going to hand it back over to Damian who’s going to discuss a few more of our

collections and how you can go about finding them.

Thank you, Damian.

DAMIAN:So to our music collections.

As well as reading and listening to history you can also sing to it.

The Library has a collection of printed sheet musical scores, some 300,000 in all, in a

range of musical styles.

Music and lyrics can tell so much of the story of a place.

Music served as a form of advertisement, a celebration or describing an event or local

personality.

A song about a place can really show what people thought about that place or what that

place wanted people to think about it.

Many songs about Canberra in the early 20th century seemed to be trying to convince Australians

to accept the new city as their capital so perhaps a little bit of that Canberra cringe

that all of us Canberrans perhaps still feel today.

Many of the older musical scores are digitised and can be seen online.

To ephemera.

Now ephemera is a term given to printed materials that were intended to be short-term or immediate

use.

They are ephemeral, seen as minor things to inform for a moment but we have collected

and kept them as they are largely the everyday documents of people’s lives that tell the

stories of these passing events.

The ephemera collection includes advertising material, postcards, posters, trade catalogues,

performance programs, tourist and travel guides and scrapbooks.

All these can tell a story of a place and the people living in it as they are the material

produced by a local group or about a local event.

Not all items are individually catalogued but they do have subject area catalogue records

and descriptive lists that can be seen through our website.

They are often grouped by who produced them or under very broad subject headings so this

is in a way a bit like manuscripts, a bit of searching may be needed to find what you’re

looking for or just something unexpected that is informative.

Again many ephemera items are digitised and viewable online, not always entire contents

of a collection.

Ephemera can be based around an event in the calendar of a place such as a festival or

formal dinner of a social group or be advertising for a place such as here, the El Dorado Motel,

the first motel in Surfers Paradise.

We are currently collecting ephemera around the COVID-19 pandemic to document the day-to-day

experiences of Australians living through this event as this event that we are living

through now will become part of our history that researchers in the future will turn to

the Library to find out more about.

So to websites.

A new resource launched by the Library just last year is the Australian Web Archive, the

AWAarchives.au domain name websites from 1996 onwards.

This covers government, commercial and personal websites.

It’s basically a snapshot of each page within a website as it existed at that time.

The AWA is accessible via Trove and so searches of Trove will include the AWA in results.

Websites can be a source of historical information as has already been compiled and published

online.

Older versions of existing websites can be seen as well as websites that may no longer

be active.

Just like collecting books that have been published the Library now aims to collect

websites that have been published online, the new way to tell old stories or to document

the history of a place from now into the future.

While all websites can be searched for there are groupings of selected websites by theme

including one on local history.

For example there are 35 different websites created for the 2013 centenary of Canberra

that have been archived that tell the story about how Canberra celebrated our local history

as well as a collection of 41 websites devoted to exploring and describing historical villages

around Australia.

So while that was a quick overview of the variety of materials in the collection that

can be used to research the local history of a place there are many other ways to find

that information online.

I want to go to a website to show you some of these online resources that can be accessed

through us and used for researching local history so I’ll click through to our National

Library homepage.

So on our Library homepage one thing to look at is research guides.

We publish a number of research guides online to aid in researching particular subjects

and parts of the Library collection.

You can see this through Using the Library and under our Research Tools and Resources,

research guides.

Listed by various subjects these research guides list useful resources, provide guidance

on using the cataloguing collections and show what resources exist beyond the Library.

They are a very good first step to researching almost any topic.

Guides that are relevant to local history include guides to Australian cemetery records,

guides to topographic maps and maps of family historians and many guides on family history

research and the use of birth, death and marriage records.

I go back to our homepage to another option to Blogs, to our Stories and into Blogs.

Staff and researchers produce blogs that are another source of information on what is in

the collections, the stories that can be told and how to use the Library collections.

New blogs are regularly published on all aspects of the Library collection and how to use the

Library.

To probably one of our most used resources, and certainly if you’re not able to come

visit us in Canberra the most important one perhaps, is our eResources so click through

from eResources to take you into our eResources portal.

What we refer to as our eResources are subscription of websites containing online journals, databases,

newspapers and eBooks.

If you’re logging into our eResource you need to accept the terms and conditions but

things such as Australian online journals and other publications on history and society

can all be relevant to researching local histories.

The first thing to do if you are trying to get into our eResources is to log in with

your National Library card and I’ll talk a bit about that shortly.

But once you’ve logged in with that card it opens up the content of a lot of things

you can see online.

Search for content within a database perhaps but the best way to perhaps start is to browse

the resources that we have.

A list of the sorts of resources we offer but also the basic subjects as a way if you

want to get started.

There are three basic categories of eResources to be aware of and having a look at these

little icons that appear before each one of them.

Free websites that are basically freely available websites that we just link to because it’s

particularly useful or perhaps hard to find, licensed eResources.

These are the ones that you can log into from home with your Library card so just look for

the one that has the small little key icon.

There are also a lot of onsite resources with the little National Library of Australia building

icon, are ones that can only be accessed here in the Library building.

But you can see even from this starting list there’s quite a variety there so from home

always look for these little key icons, these are things you can access from home.

So in talking through the various resources we use the question of course you always have

next is how to find things.

So from our Library homepage here our catalogue is just under the top banner so click on Catalogue.

The online catalogue is the first and best place to begin.

It’s basically the database of what is in the Library collections.

I’ll try and give a very basic overview of using the catalogue with some search tips.

Given how much there is you may want to find and the number of different ways to find the

same thing it’s a bit hard to get a complete this is all you need to know-type description

so the best advice I can give is to explore the catalogue.

Don’t assume you’ll find the perfect item straight away, the more you look the more

you’ll find and so be patient.

There are many different ways to search for things in our catalogue, perhaps the first

if you know a particular book that you want to find is just to search for the book title.

I’ll have a search for one that I’ve used a lot for my own local place history and in

knowing the title you just type in the title name and click find.

It’ll then bring up a list of results that match that search but the first one is the

book that I was after, Canberra following Griffin which is a really good history of

the early development of Canberra.

On a record such as this there’s already some things you can start to explore further

with.

Looking at these subject headings will effectively be links to groups of items on that same subject

so even if you find just one item that you think is going to be useful that’s the way

to then look at the subject headings, it has to find what else is on that same subject.

So again if you get stuck, just finding one item of use is really the best way to get

into things.

Another simple way to search is by keyword which is probably the broadest way to search

so I’ll have another go at that as an example.

The simplest way is just the placename that you’re interested in and history.

This is going to get a lot of different results but there are ways to narrow things down into

things that are more useful for you.

If you get too much to begin with you can use things such as these narrow search options,

just select just a particular format within that great range of things that we’ve been

talking about.

If you just want to have a look at things that are online and easy to see rather than

print materials or again those subject headings to see in this large result what are the related

subjects and by clicking on these you’ll get into those little smaller groups of items

that may be a bit easier to comprehend.

You can also arrange your search results in different ways.

The date oldest to newest is probably the best, particularly if you’re looking at

things such as historical books but if can also break up what you’re looking at by

date as well.

So don’t be put off by perhaps getting too many things in the first result, there are

all sorts of different ways that you can then break down that large list of items so things

may be a little bit more specific for you.

So these are examples of where we’ve digitised the map, the book, the oral history recording

that you may be looking at.

Things that are viewable online will have this icon on the left to click on and that

will then take you into the actual digitised view of the book where you can effectively

then read the book as it were in front of you.

To search for general works about the history of a place a good way to use is the browse

function.

You can’t browse a book yourself in a Library collection but you can browse lists of books

that have a catalogue.

So I’m going to the Browse alphabetically option, select what you want to browse subjects

and then type in a subject and for local histories the best format to follow is the placename,

the state and history.

So there you can see how it’s already starting to bring up that browse option.

By clicking on the top one you’ll see this kind of arranged list of subject headings

and by clicking on one of them you’ll get to the actual records of the books that match

that heading.

So always try that simple format of placename, state and history as the best way to get started.

In searching for a placename if the first result doesn’t get too much then think about

searching a bit broader for that same area such as think about searching for the region

rather than the actual placename itself.

You may find that there are items that are a little bit broadly discovered rather than

just under that one location.

Or think of a nearby placename or a shire name or the next neighbouring town as other

ways to get to perhaps some material about the particular item place that you want to

have a look at.

But this basic structure is the one to use, the placename, the state as an abbreviation

and history as a subject to look for.

You can also search for personal names such as a significant individual or your own family

member perhaps or family name and also look for property names.

If we can try one that we’ve had a look at before and that’s actually the item that

I showed you, some of those station books and you can see other things related to that

station name you're looking for.

While history is perhaps the best subject to be looking for from the start there are

all sorts of other subject headings that may be useful for finding out about the history

of a place, things such as city planning, description, travel, genealogy and social

life.

So using that same structure of placename, state and a subject, something like social

life and customs will bring up another grouping of things that may be useful to find out about

the history of that place.

But some basic advice on using the catalogue is to be patient, be persistent, think laterally

if the first result you get doesn’t get something that you want and if you find a

thing that is a match for what you want explore further from there through those subject headings.

There is a help page on the catalogue with tips for using the catalogue and also various

how-to videos that can be used to actually show how to search through our catalogue.So

I’ll just get back to our presentation.

The key thing in actually using the Library’s resources is to have a National Library card.

While you don’t need a card to search our online catalogue or to view digitised collection

items the card is used to log into our eResources to see that online content and if you come

to the Library building in Canberra, use to request and view items here in the Library

building . To get a Library card, apply online through our website to get a Library card

and we will then post the card out to you.

So once you find what you want what now?

If you're not in Canberra to visit the Library building there are still several ways to access

our collection.

As we’ve said through each of these formats many items are digitised and can be seen online

through our catalogue, almost six million images and we are still digitising more all

the time.

From home the Library card can be used to access eResources, online journals, eBooks

and newspapers online.

While you can’t exactly borrow books yourself from our collection we can loan many of our

books to other libraries through the interlibrary loan service.

If you find something we have in our collection go to your local public library and ask if

they can request an interlibrary loan and the book may be able to be sent there for

you to use.

You can also use our paid copying service called Copies Direct.

Using this you can order copies of items in our collection as digital scans or paper photocopies.

There may be some limits on what can be copied and how you can use it because of copyright,

access conditions on manuscripts and oral histories, and sometimes items may be just

too fragile to copy.

But submit an order for what you want and our copying staff will check all of this and

let you know what is possible.

Of course there is always Trove as I’m hoping many of you may have already used this.

Trove is like an online discovery service that combines the online catalogues of libraries,

archives, museums and galleries across Australia.

It will show you which collecting institution has a particular item so if you find something

in our collection you like search Trove and you may be able to find another library closer

to you that has the same thing.

In looking beyond just the Library for local history you should also be trying your state

library, state archives and a local public library of the place you’re looking at.

These will have many things that we ourselves may not have in our collection.

Also a local historical society is a great resource to try.

These are great sources of local information but as they often have very limited resources

or are staffed by volunteers they may not have as much of an online presence as other

sources.

If you’re able to visit Canberra and come to the Library building to use the collection

here we do operate a little differently to most libraries you may have been to.

Our collection is not all on shelves in a room where you can just browse along yourself.

With 11 million items there are just too many to have in one room to let you wander around

so our collection is kept in what we call closed stacks.

Material needs to be requested by you for us to bring it from these closed stacks to

you to use.

You’ll need a Library card for this, to log into our online catalogue and submit requests

for what you want to see and we then deliver that request material to a reading room for

you to use.

Library cards can also be used to pay for photocopying and printing in the reading rooms.

So you have a taste there of the range of materials of Library collections on the subject

of local history in a range of different formats and different ways to present information

and stories.

We hope you can see beyond just the books, there are many other formats to search and

use when researching the local history of a place and to find the story of that place,

how to use the catalogue, how to use the reading rooms and access the collection from home

and what our services are.

For any queries on using the Library such as searching for material, how to research

a subject, how to get copies or permissions, how to access something you’ve found you

can submit an online enquiry form or a phone call through our Ask a Librarian service and

this is available from our homepage.

We can’t do all your research for you but we can guide you on your search and explain

how to use our collections.

We are here to help you on your research to find the history of your place and the stories

that that place can have.

The Library that we have here is full of such stories to uncover and thank you from both

of us.

Well good afternoon and welcome to the webinar. I'm Andrew Sergeant and I’ve

been a reference librarian here at the NLA since 2000. By the way the image you’re

looking at is of Andy Cunningham and his sisters taken around 1920 probably at the family’s

property, Lanyon. Canberra locals will know the place well.Now the aim of today’s session

will be to show you how using our collections of local and social history in a range of

formats can help paint a richer picture of the lives of your ancestors to fill out the

basic details of dates and places that you may already have from your genealogical research.

Maybe it’ll help you to understand things like why they moved or why they changed jobs

and how they lived. Now there’s a fair bit to cover so I’ll get straight into it. Don’t

forget that you can submit questions to Heather and me during the course of the webinar and

we’ll try to cover at least some of them at the end.Now this isn’t going to be a

history lesson but I thought I’d give you this brief timeline of the history of Canberra

to get things going. As I mentioned a minute ago knowing what happened and when in the

place where your ancestors lived can be really helpful as you try to add flesh to the bare

bones of birth, death and marriage records in your family that you might already have.

Your ancestors may well have been involved in some of these events in some way which

will give you further avenues of investigation. A quick example might be the opening up of

the country to railways where your ancestors like some of mine were railway workers. So

it could be a worthwhile exercise for you to put together your own timeline of the places

you’re investigating even if they’re not very detailed, such as this one. So you can

see this one for Canberra starts with the evidence of indigenous Australian habitation

in this region going back to at least 25,000 years ago found in the Tidbinbilla Nature

Reserve. Several different tribal groups lived around the region, namely the Ngunnawal, Ngambri

and Walgaloo peoples. Now for those interested in indigenous genealogy I’ll show you where

to find a guide shortly that will be a good starting point. So 1820 we have the first

European explorers led by Charles Throsby in several journeys from what’s now Lake

George reaching Molonglo and Murrumbidgee Rivers. In 1824 the first European to actually

purchase land here was Joshua John Moore. He never actually lived here but established

a farm named Canberry. It took him what’s now most of Civic, the ANU and Acton Peninsula.

In the 1830s further farms were established, Palmerville, Pialligo, Yarralumla, Duntroon,

Oaks Estate, Tuggeranong, Lanyon. You can see how some of these names are from long

before the actual capital city of Canberra was established.1845 the first church opened,

St John the Baptist at Reid which is now Canberra’s oldest building. In 1863 the post office was

established. In 1887 the railway from Sydney finally connected through to Queanbeyan. In

1900 a Royal Commission was established prior to federation to decide on a site for the

new national capacity city separate from Sydney and Melbourne. In 1908 the decision was made

by Parliament to locate the capital city at the proposed Canberra site. 1909 the federal

capital territory was created from New South Wales transferring of land to become Commonwealth

Government land. In 1912 an international competition to design the new capital city

was won by American architects, Walter Burley Griffin and his wife, Marion Mahony Griffin.

In 1913 the foundation stone was laid for the city. The first sale of leases of federal

capital territory land was in 1924. In 1927 Parliament moves from Melbourne to Canberra

with the opening of the interim Parliament House and we as the then Commonwealth Parliamentary

Library came with it.Now after the second world war is when we really start to see Canberra

develop into what we have today and apart from what’s on the timeline on the screen

you have things like 1946 the ANU being founded. Woden started to be developed in 1964, Belconnen

in 1966, Tuggeranong in 1973 and Gungahlin in 1991.Now a little bit on what we do. Library’s

role as defined by the National Library of Australia Act 1960 is to ensure that documentary

resources of national significance relating to Australia and the Australian people as

well as significant non-Australian library materials are collected, preserved and made

accessible. In short our mission is to collect, connect and collaborate. Now here’s what

our homepage currently looks like. I’ll click through to the live site and quickly

show you some of the important features to look out for. This is how our home page currently

looks and if you scroll down a bit you’ve got the link to the catalogue for searching

collection material within the Library, you’ve got a link to Trove and to eResources and

I’ll go back into those in a bit more detail later. There’s information under getting

started that’s useful for people who aren’t familiar with the place. The link to get a

library card and if you don’t already have one it’s very well worthwhile getting one

even if you’re not based in Canberra because the card will give you access to electronic

resources.This Ask a Librarian tab, this is currently the preferred way of contacting

the Library during the closedown. If you click through to the enquire now button that will

start up an online form for you to fill in which will come through to us in the reference

section and it’ll then be allocated to the most appropriate section of the Library to

respond to. Also on the homepage right up the top we’ve got lots of dropdown tabs

and under Using the Library you’ll see a lot of information there, research guides,

family history research, link to our learning sessions, information about the reading rooms,

getting copies and more. There’s also much more information under the other tabs too

that you can have a look at later.Okay. Now before I go any further I’d like to point

out our online research guides. You may have seen the link a second ago. From the home

page there’s a link under the Using the Library tab for research guides. These include

many family and local history-related topics and I’ll click through to it now. There

we are, they’re listed alphabetically so you can see the very first aerial photographs,

I’ll mention a bit of those later, lots of family history-related items, one on indigenous

family history that I mentioned, indigenous language collections, the Australian Joint

Copying Project, maps that’ll be very handy for you in a few minutes so lots and lots

of interesting topics. These have been put together by our reference staff and I would

really recommend them to you as a first point of call before you do any new research on

our website. Now I’m going to spend the next little while showing you the variety

of things you can find in our collections through the catalogue to help you fill out

the story of your Canberra ancestors. Before I go any further I should stress that while

this session is about Canberra if you’re not from around these parts you can apply

the same techniques for searching for material in our collections relating to your locality.

I’m also going to mention books and other physical items in the collections but as nobody

can actually get in to see them at the moment I’ll also be showing you what you can access

online through the catalogue, Trove and eResources. Okay, to begin I’m going to show you a few

tips on searching the catalogue. What we’re doing today is really a crossover between

local history and family history so I’ll be doing a little of each.Probably the most

obvious starting point is to search for your particular family’s name and see what comes

up. Many of us might have a family member who’s already given us a head start by publishing

a family history and the Library has thousands of these in our collections, most of which

will be available for interlibrary loan to your local public library if you’re not

a Canberran. If you know of such a book it’s easily found by an author or title search.

My own family is an example.My mum’s cousin published two volumes on the McInnes family.

If any of you out there know any McInneses around this district, especially around Queanbeyan,

then they’re probably my lot. So a search for the words in McInnes family will bring

up these two books. Just quickly go into the catalogue and show

you how I got them. They’re the top two there. As you can see there’s also 40 odd

hits for other works in the collection about McInnes family. Now there’s the two books

there and you can see my very handsome great-great-great-grandfather, Duncan, and his father, Gilbert, the patriarch

of the family. There they are again listed on the catalogue with all these other ones.So

those 40 odd hits are for people who are not my family and therein lies a bit of a hurdle

for you. You may not be looking at the right family at all. We have over 150 entries in

the catalogue for Smith family, for example, so how do you get around checking through

all of these individually on the offchance that one of them has something on your family?

Thankfully there are people out there who have dedicated themselves to helping with

this quandary. They create bibliographies of family histories.In Australia one researcher

in particular, Ralph Reid, embarked on a long-term project that at its conclusion listed over

9,600 family histories that were published in and relevant to Australia with an index

of almost 450,000 surname or title entries and a supplementary listing of related placenames,

and an index of 26,000 surnames listed in selected pioneer registers. Ralph periodically

deposited his work with us on CD-ROMs, each updating the last as well as in print. Now

these aren’t widely held in libraries but we’d be happy to check our copies for you

if you put a query in through our Ask a Librarian service that I showed you earlier.Now what

if your family history hasn’t been published in its own right? The family name might not

appear in a catalogue record but you know that they’ve been long-term residents so

they could well be mentioned somewhere. Well there are locality-specific biographical registers

and indexes often produced by the local genealogical or historical societies such as this one for

Canberra and Queanbeyan produced by HAGSOC. A good search term to use in this case is

the word pioneers. A subject search, you can see that I’ve changed the search method

from the default all fields to subject for the words pioneers Queanbeyan or pioneers

Canberra will bring up a number of examples. This particular one contains 112 pocket biographies

of pioneer families, about a page on each and although their names don’t appear in

the catalogue record there's some of my McInnes at one of the family homes, [Mungula] 14:23,

long ago demolished near what’s now Callum Forest. The men in the family were apparently

very proud of their bikes and rode in local bicycle club competitions. So how do we go

a bit further, for example into where our ancestors lived and how they lived? This is

where we cross back over into the realm of local history. This time I’m going to do

a basic keyword search for the term, Canberra history. You can see I left it on all fields

which is like a keyword search but this results in almost 10,000 hits, far too many to handle.

This search looks for both words, Canberra and history, in all the fields in the record,

title, author, subject, publishing details and any notes fields. This is the broadest

possible search but it will pick up lots of results that won’t be relevant. The default

sorting is by relevance ranking, similar to a search engine which puts those results with

both words together to the top so you may get some good results on your first page but

by the last page a search like this will throw up a lot of meaningless results for you. So

the message is be careful when doing an all fields search. It might work well for some

searches but not for others that incorporate commonly used words.So a good way to narrow

it down straight away is to change the search method to subject and you can see there I’ve

now changed it from all fields to subject and this straight away has the effect of narrowing

it down to just over 1,200 hits. Still a lot, of course.Now you can also sort your results

by date, author or title if relevant. I’ve sorted this list by date, oldest to newest

and you can also use the narrowing options on the right-hand side to further narrow things

down. In this case the format and eResources options might be particularly useful to see

what's been digitised that you can access offsite. Now another way of being more specific

is to use the hot links subject headings in the catalogue record. You can see this example

is quite a few subject headings. These are assigned by catalogue as according to a global

standard called Library of Congress subject headings. The technical librarian speak for

this is controlled vocabulary. You don’t really need to remember that, just remember

that this system allows you to use the standardised term across most library catalogues anywhere

in the world. If you’re in a record like this simply click on the link to see more

on the same subject. Now while it’s a global system it is based on US cataloguing rules

so you’ll need to keep in mind that it contains American terminology, for example it might

use words like ranches instead of farms in the subject headings or railroads for railways

etc. So if you're using subject searches just be aware of that.Now some other things I’d

like to note before I leave this record is cite this link. That’ll generate citations

in three different styles or send it off to endnote which is very handy if you’re creating

a bibliography or writing an article. You can email or print the pages as well, of course.

The add to favourites link - when you logged in with your card this will let you keep and

sort as many catalogue records as you want to indefinitely. That way you can come back

to them any time without the need to write down details.The online versions link there

– this one usually goes to a digital version on the publisher’s website which may no

longer exist so you’ll see options there to look in Trove, the Wayback Machine or Google.

In this case the site was the Canberra 100 site that was created for the Canberra Centenary

in 2013 and as the way of things on the internet this site doesn’t exist live anymore but

if you click on the Trove link you go through to the Trove web archive where you’ll actually

get a PDF copy of the book.This field is also where there would be a link to an ebook version

of a publication if it was deposited with us which might be accessible offsite depending

on the access conditions set by the publisher. Now the series field there, if you know the

title of a series, in this case Keys to Canberra’s History, and you wanted to see what else was

published in that series use the advanced search tab up here, select series from the

dropdown menu and type or copy and paste in the name of the series and that will bring

up the rest of the titles in the same series for you.Check the notes field if there is

one for any information about the item that might be important. The similar items box

over at the right can be another good way to discover related results. It’s computer-generated

based on common keywords that it’s found in the records so it may or may not find things

that are actually relevant to your particular search. The find in other libraries link here

drops you straight into Trove and does a search for the item to let you see where else it

might be held.Now I want to show you a bit more on subject searching which is the best

way to locate material if you know what to do rather than just searching for random keywords.

You can simply use combinations of the subject heading terms in the basic catalogue search

screen and change the search method to subject. This will find records that have these terms

just in the subject field which will usually bring up adequate results for you. You might

remember that I did this a little bit earlier when I narrowed down my keyword search for

Canberra history.But to do a more methodical and precise search click on the browse alphabetically

tab. I think the best way to show you this is going to be live so I’ll leave the slides

for a minute and go back to the website, just hope it works. Okay. So there is my results

for Canberra history and as you can see I got 1,200 results. If I click on the browse

alphabetically tab and select subjects and now I start typing in one of those Library

of Congress subject headings you can see it starts wanting to drop me in that place at

that point in the list. You’ll see it’ll start going chronological and then from there

alphabetical and Canberra ACT will have most of the headings. Some of them will have more

than one subheading and the more headings the narrower the subject focus of that work

is going to be. Then you simply click on the previous and next arrows to go back and forward

through the list. You can keep going as far as you want.So try the same for Queanbeyan.

Drops you in at that minute and again it starts off with Queanbeyan Age, various societies

and clubs, again works about them treated as a subject, gives you related notes that

might be useful and then it goes into the geographical again which is where most of

the headings are going to be.Again as I mentioned before, do this for whatever location you’re

interested in so do it for say Bathurst. It starts off with the Bathurst 1000 because

numbers come before letters in this system and then it starts going into alphabetical

listings and people with the name Bathurst. There’s a use instead heading so if you

use the wrong heading it might suggest to you which one is the right one to use. If

I went back and narrowed it down a bit further, Bathurst, NSW, it’s now skipped a few pages

and put me into the headings for Bathurst, the location.So this is a much more methodical

way of using the subject headings and it might give you some subheadings that you wouldn’t

have thought of previously. As I mentioned you’ll sometimes also see things like preferred

headings if you type in the wrong term or see also notes that can give you other related

headings to try. Okay so back out of here for the moment and back to the slides. Here’s

just a few suggested subheadings that you can use, they work for Canberra or Queanbeyan

specifically but of course trialling the same method for whatever location you’re interested

in. There’s many more that you’ll see as you work your way through the catalogue

as well. Of course the larger the place that you’re interested in the more headings

and the more likely you’re going to find something. Here's a list of a few of the subheadings

to try after a geographic location such as Canberra ACT or Bathurst NSW. Again the number

of results you’ll get of course will vary depending on the place you’re interested

in but these are some of the more commonly used ones and you can see a lot of those are

directly relevant to family history research in one way or another. Now I hope you’re

enjoying some of these watercolours that I’ve been throwing into the presentation. This

one’s of an old German settler’s farm on the Molonglo River that’s long gone and

the land is now under Lake Burley-Griffin, not far from here. If you have anyone in the

family who may have farmed along the Molonglo Valley there’s a book that will be a very

handy reference to you. It’s called Lost Houses of the Molonglo Valley, Canberra before

the Federal Capital City published in 2007 so fairly recent.Now in the book the author,

Linda Young, has incorporated a map laying out the locations of the farms covered in

the book or numbers there. You can see Linda has overlaid the old course of the Molonglo

River on top of a modern aerial photo. Canberra locals will know that this is where the Library

is so number 16 is just on the lawns down next to the lake in front of the Library.

Now as it happens the previous owner of that farm was my Irish convict, great-great-great-grandfather,

one John Crinigan. It actually belonged to his second wife, his daughter married a Corkhill

and for the locals, yes, the same Corkhills who now run the landscaping supply business.

So working at the Library it feels like I’ve really actually come back to my roots literally.

Just quickly old Crinigan was an interesting character, he came out from Ireland on the

Waterloo in 1837, was assigned to G T Palmer or Palmerville, now in Ginninderra and then

after marrying and getting his ticket of leave he built a stone hut at what is now Amaroo.

Its foundations have recently been excavated and it’s part of the Canberra History Farm

now.Which brings me onto our pictures collection. We have a large collection of historical and

modern images of Canberra many of which are digitised and available through the catalogue.

If you’re looking for a particular place an easy starting point is simply to type in

a location and limit the search format to picture, for example Tharwa, Lanyon, Tuggeranong,

Griffith, Woden. We also have modern collections, not just historical items, for example by

Loui Seselja that I’ll show you in a minute.Here's a shot from Mt Ainslie. You can clearly see

the Sydney and Melbourne building in the middle distance and Northbourne Avenue coming up

to it with Reid and Braddon developing quite well. This image is from the De Salis, Farrer

and Champion families’ photograph collection. Now you can download any of these low-res

images straight from the catalogue for personal use or study through the Trove viewing screen.

If you click on the thumbnail image it’ll take you through to that and then you can

download them or print them from there.Now with items in formed collections such as this

or photos and albums that have been individually digitised and catalogued you’ll see extra

links in the catalogue record such as this one. There’s a link to the parent record

for the collection as a whole and below that is the link to see all the individual child

records in that collection. So in this case it’s as I say from the De Salis, Farrer

and Champion families’ photograph collection and if you clicked on the collection record

link that will take you to the record for that whole collection. By clicking on the

child link you can see here, here’s the first few child records for that particular

collection. Note over here under your eResources the entire collection has been digitised and

is accessible online. Now I mentioned the modern photographs. There’s one from 1996

shot by our staff photographer, Loui Seselja, who also took the photograph of the Library

that you would have seen at the very beginning of our presentation. Loui worked with us for

several decades and took thousands of photos, a lot of which are now digitised and online

because we own the copyright. Okay, onto our manuscript material. Now the manuscript collections

in the Library contains diaries, letters and notes, unpublished material. For the Canberra

region we also have some quite rare family farm business records. Manuscript materials

are of course usually considered as primary source documents in historical research so

as it says in the slide best place, start with the catalogue using a family name or

maybe a relevant subject heading and limit your search to manuscripts. Some of them will

have online finding aid and I’ll show you that in a second. If there’s no online finding

aid you may need to use our Ask a Librarian service to enquire further. Examples specific

to Canberra and the region include the De Salis family, Cunningham family, the Faithfull

family, Samuel Schmach, Reverend Pierce Galliard Smith or Terrance Aubrey Murray of Yarralumla

which locals will know now as Government House. The Manuscripts Collection is quite complex

and very little of it is digitised or accessible online. It often needs the mediation of expert

members of the Manuscripts team so I’d suggest that in most cases you might need to use that

Ask a Librarian form to make initial enquiries if you’re after anything from this area.I’ll

quickly show you an example of a catalogue record and the accompanying finding aid. So

it’s rather a long record. This is the record for papers of the De Salis family from roughly

1840 through to about 1930. You can see it’s a decent-sized collection, it's 14m of shelf

space which is how archivist and manuscript librarians describe the size of a collection.

There are over 50 boxes and indicates that there are permission requirements for some

of these before you’ll get access to them so again this is where you’d need to contact

Manuscripts via that Ask a Librarian form to go further. But there’s also additional

notes in this case about associated related materials that might be useful.Now you also

see up here the link to the finding aid which will give you a detailed listing of the contents

of each box and you’ll need to refer to this finding aid if you want to order copies

of things or use them in the reading rooms. Here’s what the first part of the finding

aid itself looks like if you click through in that link. Again you can then scroll down

or click on links in the table of contents to get more detailed descriptions of the contents

of each. You’ll see now you’re starting to get box numbers indicated.

Okay. Onto maps. Now our maps collection is the largest in Australia and there are many

maps in the Canberra region. Again the easiest way to begin a search is to use a placename

and limit the search to maps. I’d also suggest that you check our detailed research guides

on maps that I showed you earlier to get the most out of your research and of course use

the Ask a Librarian form to contact our maps staff for further advice.Town maps like this

one show the first title holders of smaller town allotments. This one’s of Queanbeyan

and there’s also a very good one at Braidwood from the same time. These examples also show

dwellings and significant buildings in the towns. Many of the house and buildings on

the Braidwood map are actually still there. Pastoral maps will show squatting or pastoral

runs while parish maps were created by Lands Departments to register all landholdings and

will show more detail, title holders, size of the block, a portion number and a purchase

registration number and other useful geographical information which you can then use to request

historical land title searches of the relevant state or territory Lands Department. Many

of the older maps are now online and these are a great boon to local and family history

and show the occupiers of runs and registered land title holders.Your starting point will

be to locate the parish within a county. If you’re not sure of this you’ll need to

use a gazetteer. For pastoral runs there are gazetteers for each state mostly published

in the 1860s or ‘70s while Gleeson’s List of New South Wales Place Names is the most

comprehensive guide for parish and place names for New South Wales. These are both online

and again see the Australian maps for family history research guide for links and more

information while in Wikipedia there’s a very handy article titled Lands Administrative

Divisions of Australia that lists all the land divisions state by state. We also have

a terrific collection of real estate sales plans advertising subdivisions from the late

1800s to the early 1900s. This one’s of Ainslie of 1927. For 20th century research

we also hold a huge collection of aerial photos, I think from memory starting in the 1920s.

So again try a catalogue search for a place name plus the word aerial and limit the format

to maps. Now I’ll quickly show you what I meant about pastoral maps versus parish

maps. Here’s the section of a pastoral map for New South Wales and part of Queensland

that I’ve zoomed in to show the part covering the Canberra region. Now as you can see there’s

not a lot of detail. It’s good for putting a landholding to the larger geographical context,

though. So parish maps are probably going to be of more use to most of you.Here's an

example of the catalogue record for a map of the parish of Goorooyarroo in the County

of Murray near Queanbeyan. This is what it looks like when I click on the thumbnail to

go through to the Trove viewer and when I zoomed in to look at more detail what do I

find but my old ex-convict ancestor, John Crinigan. Officialdom always had trouble spelling

his name, probably the thick Irish accent that he had but that’s definitely him and

as you can see he’s holding a few parcels of land there right next to a larger block

that was assigned to his former master, G T Palmer.So that really says something I think

about how Australia developed into an egalitarian society when an ex-convict could end up owning

land right next door to his former master. I also found lots of other family names on

this map including my McInneses and others that we’re related to through marriage like

the Bing Lees, Southhalls, Rowleys and others. So these maps can be a real goldmine of information

for family historians. Okay, I’ll move on to oral histories. Now oral histories in the

National Library may not necessarily be the first thing that may come to mind but our

oral history and folklore collection is a rich and deep source that is increasingly

easy to access as it is being digitised and made available as audio files through the

catalogue. There are several Canberra-related oral history collections including those listed

here, many of them done by local farming families such as the Oldfields, the De Salis family,

the Southalls, Cotters, the Jeffreys as well as many by politicians, senior public servants

and ordinary citizens.So for those that have been digitised there will be a link to listen

to the audio. You should also look out for the timed notation at the side if available

and some have a printed transcript that is keyword searchable and linked directly to

the audio which is a real advantage. Oral histories that haven’t been digitised or

have restricted access conditions are accessed in the Special Collections Reading Room. To

find more in the catalogue use audio as a search limit.Now you will need to be aware

of permissions attached to the oral history that you wish to use. These conditions will

vary so check the catalogue record carefully and also use the parent child limits that

I mentioned before to go from collection level records to the individual interviews. Once

again contact the oral history staff for advice via that Ask a Librarian form.Now here’s

just a sample of what you can hear. I hope it’s going to work for us, I’ll click

through to it. This is a small portion of Mr Oswald Woodger interviewed in 1971 whose

father had the first petrol station in Kingston. He remembers the start of the Fishwick industrial

area and early businesses so I’ll click on the Listen online. I’ve read all the

terms and conditions and accept them and here you can see now you’ve got your timed transcripts.

I think I’ll scroll down a bit and might go with that one.“That, that place which

I've just mentioned was known as the Garden City Service Station and the recent name I

don't think anybody else could get the name but how-, however. Well, I was in the business

for a few years until 1931 until the depression hit everybody of course. And my o-, my father

and my uncle, Mr Kalthore, and a few other people who were interested in these businesses,

they lost their capital and, and eventually they were wound up I think and leased out

to other people. From there, my father thought that I –“Okay, that’s probably enough

of that, you can listen to more later, of course.Okay, quickly on to our eclectic collection

of ephemera. If you’re unfamiliar with the term, ephemera are transient things that are

often not intended to last, postcards, menus, pamphlets, tickets, invitations, programs,

catalogues, greeting cards, timetables, flyers, orders of service, stickers, badges, bookmarks,

trade cards and even plain old junk mail we’ve got. For Canberra this includes things like

federation and the founding of the city and their centenaries, advertising material, area

guides, booklets, postcards, posters, t-shirts. You can also look for ephemera from businesses,

organisations, societies etc. For example here we’ve got the Hotel Canberra, Canberra

Theatre, Canberra Rep, The Canberra Philharmonic Society, Canberra Show, the Grammar School,

Canberra Golf Club.So if your family were involved in any events or were members of

societies you could find little treasures of information that you just won’t get with

other formats. A simple way to find this material is just to use the words Canberra or your

location and ephemera and a basic search. I’ll click through and just show you an

example. So I’ve searched a keyword search for Canberra ephemera and now if I restrict

it to just NLA digital material to see what’s online that anybody can access and here’s

the laying of the foundation stone in 1913. There’s the catalogue record for it. Again

there's the formal subject heading, printed ephemera of Australia which is very broad

which is why in this case it’s probably more precise to actually use a keyword search

with a location and the word ephemera.If I click on the thumbnail and go browse this

collection this brings up the items within that particular collection. You can see there’s

a few there. This one here has eight children or eight pages within it and there it is,

the programme in all its glory. If I scroll on a bit further see if I can pick it up.

Lady Denman naming the city and of course they weren’t quite used to spelling the

word Canberra yet so it’s spelt with one R all the way through the programme. Okay.

On now to newspapers which of course can be an excellent tool for research. We’re lucky

to have much of Canberra’s past available in Trove but there are also other way access

newspapers. We hold a very strong collection of papers relating to the Canberra and southern

New South Wales region as well of course as papers from around Australia in print, on

microfilm and online. With newspapers you might need to be prepared to follow the name

change trail, for example The Queanbeyan Age went through several name changes from 1864

to 1927. It was The Queanbeyan Age and General Advertiser, later it became The Queanbeyan

Age and Queanbeyan Observer. It has now of course virtually disappeared after merging

a few years ago with The Chronicle. Now there’ll be separate catalogue records for each name

change but you’ll see former and later titles in the records to help you navigate your way

through. It’s also important when looking in the catalogue to check the holding section

of the record under the In the Library tab to make sure we actually hold the issue that

you’re after ‘cause there are frequently gaps in our holdings, especially for the 19th

century collection of newspapers.Generally in Trove Australian digitised newspapers cease

at the end of 1954 because copyright still applies after 1955 although we do have The

Canberra Times through to 1995 in Trove. Otherwise there’s very little online in Trove post

1954. You’ll get The Sydney Morning Herald archives which go up to early 1995, you’ll

get those through the eResources portal that I’ll show you in a minute but otherwise

for this period you’ll need to go to microfilm until from the 1990s onwards you can go into

things like Newsbank through eResources which is available from home. So it’s good to

be aware of that gap between when Trove at the beginning of the online newspaper databases

when manual searching and microfilms or even print was necessary. But don’t forget if

you’re not Canberra-based microfilms can be sent to your local public library via an

interlibrary loan. We run regular learning sessions about newspapers using all of the

different formats as well as a Trove newspaper session so I won’t do too much more on newspapers

now. Speaking of Trove I’m betting that most of you will be familiar with Trove to

some degree especially with the newspaper zone. Again I’ll only briefly touch on this

because it can be a whole session in itself. Once again we do run regular sessions on Trove

that you should keep an eye out for. Something that catches a lot of people out on Trove

is that while it’s hosted by the NLA it’s actually a collaborative national project

with contributions from hundreds of libraries, museums, archives and other cultural collecting

institutions around Australia. So look at it like a collection of collections and if

you find something in Trove that you want to reproduce you’ll need to approach the

institution that holds the original material. If it’s not ours we can’t give you permission

to use it. You don’t need a library card to use Trove but you can create your own Trove

account so you get extra features. Don’t forget that it is more than just newspapers,

it lists books, journals, manuscripts, government gazettes, pictures, maps, audio, archived

websites, lists and tags created by other users. You can also restrict your searches

to only online material. Now just quickly here's a couple of results from a search of

the newspapers from my old convict forebear, John Crinigan, to show those of you who may

not be familiar with Trove and how the newspapers look.Now here’s the results after I searched

for the phrase, John Crinigan. You’ll see there’s an article about the remains of

his stone hut in Amaroo, a couple of entries in the New South Wales government gazettes,

there’s six results altogether for that, mostly about contract tenders that he’d

submitted. There's about 34 results for newspaper articles. If I go to the newspapers here he

is in the Queanbeyan Magistrate’s Court in 1863 on charges of assault. Now the original

newspaper wasn’t very well printed unfortunately so the scan’s a little blurry but you might

be able to make out some of it about a pub called Woodman’s Inn where there was singing

and dancing going on and he burst into the room and let one of the singers and dancers

have a bit of a mouthful of how badly he was doing and it turned out into a bit of a melee.

So he was fined one pound and the magistrate said that at his age – he would have been

about 44 by then – he should have known better. Here he is in 1868 on slightly less

serious charges of breaching the Diseases in Sheep Act. The charge was withdrawn but

he had to pay the inspector’s expenses of 10 shillings. There’s a few more instances

where John gets on the wrong side of the authorities. But by the time we see his death notice in

1899 he was now a man of sterling character and held in the highest esteem by all classes

in the community. No mention of his convict past or his brushes with the law. So it seems

like even then you couldn’t believe everything you read in the papers.Okay, onto briefly

our eResources portal. So this is where you come for access to licensed subscription-based

electronic resources such as eBooks, full text journal databases, historical and current

newspaper databases like Gale NewsVault, The London Times archive, NewsBank, it has links

to other websites and genealogy databases, Ancestry and Find My Past. Now 80% of these

resources are accessible offsite either as free websites or through your NLA card which

is another reason to get one if you haven’t done so already.With the Library being closed

at the moment the eResources portal will be well worth exploring. For those new to the

site I suggest you look at the short video under the help tab to get you going and I’ll

show you that in a second. If you’ve previously used our eResources but not for a few months

you’ll see that it has changed quite a bit. The site is now almost totally keyword searchable

except for things like Ancestry, Find My Past and a couple of others meaning that you don’t

need to search individual databases separately. You can do a keyword search across the whole

site and get results. However you can still navigate around the site like you could previously

to individual resources using the browse eResources tab. Now I’m going to click through to the

live site and give you a very quick look and it’s worked for me. Now again I’d need

to accept the terms and conditions before I can go any further. There's the help tab

with the little video that explains how it all works. Under the browse eResources tab

for those who’ve used it previously there’s the browse by category feature that you might

be most familiar with. If you click on the little plus symbols, gives you narrower topics

within them. So there’s one for Genealogy ACT, not a great deal of stuff in there, I’m

afraid, but there’s a link to Find My Past and other things. You can see the little symbols

next to them indicate the type of resource they are so that is a little globe icon, that’s

just a free website that you don’t need to register for. Find My Past has the library

log which means it’s only accessible within the building. Other things with the gold keys

are what you access through your card. You can also search alphabetically if you know

the name of the database that you’re looking for so if I go to A – I’ll get rid of

Genealogy first – go to A and that lists all the resources beginning with the letter

A. There’s a very large full text journal database called Academic Search Complete covering

a huge range of subjects and again you see the variety of material. There’s a link

to an Ancestry.Okay now I’ll do a very quick keyword search demonstration which shows you

how to search across the site. I’m just going to search for Tuggeranong district.

That’s brought up 206 results which you can narrow down by various methods again,

similar to what we do in the catalogue or Trove and I'm just going to pick that first

one there, Tuggeranong town that never was. It was published in the Canberra Historical

Journal which of course we have in print in the collections but this way you can get straight

to it in full text and there it is. From here you can of course download onto your device

or print the article out. There is what Walter Burley Griffin envisaged for Tuggeranong,

it was going to be a military [unclear] 55:41 which never eventuated. Now again I just want

to stress that there’s much in the eResources portal on all sorts of subjects and again

you can read eBooks or download full text articles from offsite if you’re logged in

with a card. Ancestry and Find My Past will have a lot of the records that are otherwise

normally available in the building in our family history area. These will include things

like records for births and baptisms, marriages and divorces, deaths and burials, inquests

and probate records, directories and almanacs, land records, electoral rolls, 19th century

census, convict records, immigration and shipping records and more. Now you can access Ancestry

or Find My Past through your own personal subscription. We can’t do that but we can

do limited lookups on our subscription for you if you send us details of the person you’re

interested in via the Ask a Librarian form but please be aware that we can only do up

to an hour of genealogical research for you so please don’t send us lists of names.

We can’t undertake ongoing research on your behalf. Now a final word on getting copies

of our wonderful collection material. Firstly if your local public library is still open

they may be able to get books or microfilms from our collections or even elsewhere in

Australia. They do that via the interlibrary loan system. There’s usually a fee for this

service so ask your library to arrange this and they’ll tell you whatever fees are involved.

Instead of borrowing you can of course look for second-hand copies of books on the internet

via one of the many bookseller sites out there. I can suggest a site called Books and Collectibles

where many Australian booksellers list their stock and a site called Via Library for international

searches which also covers the Australian sites. Our Copies Direct service is another

alternative. Use it to buy copies of our collection material that you can’t copy for yourself,

for example most special collection items or if you need higher resolution images or

of course material from our general collections if you can’t borrow it. Most things can

be copied within copyright allowances and permissions and exemptions may apply for some

purposes such as research and study.This is the Copies Direct page, there’s a link to

it at the very bottom of our home page. You can see to start an order you can click on

that describe the item cartouche and it will start up a blank order form that you fill

in but the easiest way to order a copy of something from our collections is to go through

the catalogue record itself. At the bottom of any record click on the order a copy tab

or if you’re in the Trove viewing screen for something use the shopping cart icon on

the left-hand side. The order form will then be populated with the details of the item

automatically which saves you a lot of work and you then complete the form online. A credit

card is required. Now if you’re not sure about copyright check in the copyright status

tab. We also have information on copies and copyright under the Using the Library tab

on our home page that I showed you right at the beginning. If you’re still not sure

or if the record says copyright’s undetermined I’d suggest that you put the order in regardless

and our Copies Direct staff will then contact you if there were any copyright or other issues

to deal with and your credit card would not be debited if they can’t fill the order.

Okay, lastly don’t forget that we’re only one of a number of institutions that will

have materials relating to Canberra’s history. Here’s a list of some of the main ones to

consider with links to their websites. Of course unfortunately all are currently closed

to the public but their sites will have varying degrees of online content to explore. While

I’m at it I know that the societies would welcome new members if you're interested in

joining. HAGSOC, the Heraldry and Genealogy Society of Canberra, has an excellent research

library for members and it also publishes a very useful guide to doing your research

called Family History for Beginners and Beyond which is now into its 16th edition. You don’t

need to be a member to buy it. Again there’s a link to that on their home page. Another

interesting one there that many of you may not be aware of is the Capital History Here

website which has only been going for a couple of years. It has regular articles on Canberra

history, updates on Canberra in the news and hosts a new project called Canberra 100 which

over this year will tell the story of Canberra through 100 objects and that kicked off with

the iconic Canberra red brick. Well that wraps it up for me. Thank you all for staying the

distance with me and I hope it’s been useful to you.

Welcome, everyone, and thank you for joining me today.

My name is Aaron and I am a reference librarian here at the National Library of Australia.

Now before we begin I have to start out by saying that I am not an expert in dating photographs

but this talk has been developed with the help of our special collection cataloguers

and I do have a lot of experience in hunting down the right information in our collections.

So what we’re going to be having a look at today, we’re going to have a look at

how you can date photographs that you might have in your own personal collections and

what clues the images might provide to tell you important details about your family history.

So these methods are similar to how research librarians here at the National Library go

about their daily work and some of the ways that you can find out information about the

photos are similar to how the National Library describes and dates photos in our own collections.

So we’ll be having a look at how you can not only find out a little bit about the photos

but we’ll be having a look at how you can find photos in the Library’s collection.

We have an extensive pictures collection and it could contain images perhaps of your family

history, your town’s history, something that’s relevant and interesting to you perhaps,

or some photos that could give you some context about a particular time or location.

So let’s begin, shall we?

First up what is the photo?

I’m going to assume that most of us have an old photo sitting at home somewhere, it

could be black and white, sepia, it could be of some family members or a location that’s

perhaps central to your family story outside in a garden, something like that but perhaps

you want to find out more about that photo.

Hopefully you know a little bit about the photo, perhaps who one of the people in a

group might be or how the photo even came to be in your possession.

Maybe it was from your mother’s family passed down through the generations or perhaps the

photos are in an album.

Knowing who owned that album is a great start to narrow down which side of the family it

is or what the events are likely of.

But that’s not always the case, I suppose.

Identifying individuals is one of the very basic ways that you can start to get an idea

of what the photo is and what it’s about.

Hopefully you know who they are as I said or even better the information has been written

on the photo, as you can see, this photo here.

Doesn’t actually tell us who the individuals are but there is a little bit of writing and

it might give us a starting point to find out where we’re starting from.

However if you don’t have any of that information that’s fine.

If the photographs you have are still a bit of a mystery, don’t worry.

I’m here today to show you a little bit about how to put your detective hat on and

how to discover some of the clues in those family photos you might have.

Alright so let’s begin.

What we might do is just do a little bit of a run-through the history of photography so

having an idea of what the photo is and what the likely age of the photo is going to be

is going to be useful to give us a date range.

So we’ll be mainly exploring 19th century photographs in this talk as they’re older

and they usually tend to be the source of most mystery in a lot of family albums where

the photographer and perhaps the subjects in the photo are no longer with us.

So photography was invented in the 1930s but it wasn’t very common until the 1860s.

Sorry, 1830s and common in the 1860s.

So this does of course mean that you are not likely to find images of your convict ancestors

as they came across in the first fleet but it does start providing us with a clear date

for dating photos.

So photography was common in the ‘60s but hugely expensive and it was largely restricted

to photography studios.

Even individuals who could afford to have a photo taken may have only ever had two or

three photos taken of them in their lifetime.

In the early 1900s the famous Kodak box brownie and celluloid film provided a more affordable

option and we start to see more personal, more intimate photos happening and then continuing

into the 20th century photos become more and more accessible and more popular.

Colour photography, while it’s been around since the ‘40s wasn’t really the norm

until the ‘60s or thereabouts.

So let’s have a look at different types of photos.

So you’ve all seen different types of old photos in different formats, we’ll go through

a couple of those.

This is by no mean an exhaustive list but it might give you an idea of the kind of thing

that we’re looking at.

So first up we have the daguerreotype so very early photographic process, one of the first.

They were first introduced in Europe in 1839 and remained popular for about 20 years.

The photo was usually made on thin copper plate and it gave them this distinct, almost

ghostly mirror-like appearance.

The photos seemed to float.

Being on thin copper surfaces actually meant that the photo and the negative themselves

were very fragile so some of them got easily damaged as you can see in this picture here,

we can just see this ghostly image staring back at us.

Daguerreotypes were usually housed in these hinged frames and they were very precious

things, very expensive things.

They cost around a week’s wage for the average labourer, about a guinea in those times so

something that only those of well-off means could actually afford.

So very precious, very looked after.

Next, moving on, the ambrotype, kind of the same process.

Ambrotypes are a photo on glass instead of copper.

The glass negative was backed in black which then gave us this positive image on the other

side of the glass.

Like the daguerreotypes they were also presented in small hinged cases as we can see here and

they tend to be a little clearer, a little – I don’t know, denser, I guess.

They don’t have that ghostly floating quality like the daguerreotype does.

One thing about ambrotypes, though, they only produced one copy, no duplicates could be

made so each ambrotype is a unique thing, it is an original and no more copies can be

made of it.

They are incredibly fragile.

Next up we have the carte de visite or CDV, they were introduced in 1859 and they became

one of the most common forms of photography in the 19th century and they cost around a

shilling a time.

You’d be very lucky if you had a daguerreotype or an ambrotype at home.

It’s more likely you probably have a carte de visite in your album somewhere.

They tend to be this sepia-toned image and have a fairly standard measurement so 2.5

inches by 4 inches, 6.3 by 10.5cm for those of us who are metric.

As I said they tend to be sepia-toned and they were mounted on thick paper.

They were traded between friends almost like calling cards or collecting cards, I guess.

It's possible to get an approximate date of the carte de visite from the quality and shape

of the card on which they’re mounted.

Early cartes from the 1860s or thereabouts are thin, poor quality and pretty bland in

detail but as the decades roll on they get more and more elaborate, the card gets thicker

and better quality and the borders become a bit fancier.

Carte de visite often include the photographer’s name or the studio in which they were created

which you can see here in this image but something to keep in mind, that if you do have some

carte de visite in your family albums, keep in mind that the subjects were not always

private individuals, it was very popular to collect cartes of famous people, famous actors,

singers, military people, generals, things like that.

So just because you have this image in your family album it doesn’t necessarily mean

that that person is related to you, it might pay to do a little bit of a delve into who

that person might be, especially if they’re wearing ostentatious clothing or high-ranking

military outfits, things like that.

Here are some more examples of some carte de visites, you can see the photographer studios

written on the left and right, most cards.

The one on the left is an example of a hand-coloured card, it’s not colour photography.

Charming but perhaps the hand-colouring could be a little heavy-handed in this instance

but still charming, nonetheless.

Next, similar to a carte de visite is the cabinet card.

Similar in that it’s printed on card but these tend to be larger, include extensive

logos and studio names, things like that.

These become common in the second half of the 1800s.

The cabinet card was large enough to be seen across the room and they were typically displayed

in cabinets or on mantlepieces, things like that.

Could be a bit of a talking point in a room as well.

I particularly like this image.

I have no idea what’s going on but I don’t know whether they’re acting a scene or something,

but it looks amusing anyway.

Moving on, going back to the daguerreotype style of photo here we have the tintype, also

known as the ferrotype and it was widely used during the 1860s and ‘70s.

It lost popularity when higher quality prints came along but did survive into the 20th century,

usually as a carnival novelty kind of thing.

It’s the cheapest photographic option of the time costing as little as three pence

a piece.

It started out in formal studios but later became popular with street and travelling

photographers as they could be ready in only a couple of minutes so we see people from

a broader sample of society being able to afford photos and less staged photos than

we would have seen in old-fashioned studio photography.

Instead of glass or card the image was printed on an iron plate hence the name ferrotype.

No tin was actually used ironically, and they had this characteristic dark, black appearance.

Next we have photo postcards so we’re in the 1900s now, introduced in 1903.

Basically it’s a photographic image printed on photocard stock.

A bit like you might visit somewhere today and pick up a postcard of a stock image this

was a way to personalise your postcard.

So you have the photo on the front of you standing in front of a famous landmark or

even your own house but on the back we’ve got this standard postcard infrastructure.

Perhaps you’ve got some of these in your album and you’re lucky enough to have a

personal message written on the back which is really nice to have and fill out the story

of that photo but it’s okay if you don’t.

So these were heavily, heavily collected, again trading cards or calling cards and were

used as we would call them today souvenirs.

So a few more examples here, the Mountain Grand Pleasure Resort in Warburton, Victoria,

a whole group posing in the garden but then you have another example here of the five

men standing outside the Pig and Whistle Hotel.

I don’t know where it is but looks like it would offer a rip-roaring time.

Again an example of the hand-coloured card here.

So in 1889 the earliest type of photographic film was introduced so film as we know it

today.

The first transparent plastic film was created in the late 1800s but it was very rare prior

to 1900 so the film was initially made from highly flammable nitrocellulose called nitrate

film.

Cellulose acetate or safety film was introduced in 1908 so it took a while to catch on because

the safety film was more expensive but it wasn’t flammable or as flammable so there’s

always a trade-off, I guess.

The first Kodak camera was introduced in 1888 but it wasn’t until 1900 when the box brownie

became available for five shillings that we see roll print really taking off and becoming

an affordable option.

Then of course not long after that the first world war and the following years saw a large

growth in the popularity of roll film.

The availability of cheaper photographic options, we see more amateur photographers.

Casual family photographs became common, again those more intimate family photos rather than

posed and staid-looking photos.

Continuing with the analysis of a photograph as an object, in addition to taking into consideration

the format of the photo it’s worth taking into account the information that can be found

perhaps in or around the photo.

So it could include handwritten text and dates.

So the image on the left here, we have three names of the three people in the photo which

is really handy.

The one on the left, we have information actually written on the photo, probably before it was

developed.

Not as aesthetically pleasing perhaps but it definitely does the job, tells us what

the photo is and where it’s at.

Could be written on the back, preferably and hopefully in a soft pencil and not a Biro.

But if it’s in an album it could be written underneath the photo or in the album as well

so it’s always great when you’ve got some written information.

Like this photo, full of information.

If you can read the handwriting well good luck to you but the information is there.

I’m going to say though with family photos, it’s natural to assume that the written

information is correct and it likely is but you should always be open to the possibility

that the information is incorrect.

Any of you who have even started to scratch the surface of your family history will know

that there is always that family story that’s been passed down as gospel but on a little

bit of closer inspection something just doesn’t add up, dates don’t match, people aren’t

in that place at that time.

It could just be misunderstood information, or someone’s got wires crossed somewhere

but it’s worth keeping that in mind.

So using supporting information that you can find in, on and around the photos, we can

help decipher whether that information is correct.

So some other ways that we can date photos, not just from the type of photo are things

like postal marks.

Perhaps you have one of those photographic postcards that were sent.

Postmarks are a great way so the franking mark on photos can give us an idea.

So we can see in this photo it’s going to George Street in Sydney but it’s been marked

by the post office in Goulburn in New South Wales.

You can also see where the stamp would be fixed there’s another stamp there.

It’s hard to read in this instance but on many of them it is easier to read.

I’m definitely not going to go into stamps right here because we do not have time but

there are many websites online dedicated to dating and deciphering stamps.

Also the Kodak Austral postcard can be dated off the text around where the stamp would

be affixed.

You can see in each example here the kind of format and layout is a little bit different.

The website that is listed down the bottom here, and it will be included in the link

of the YouTube video, it’s a whole forum dedicated to how to date these postcards just

by the writing of Kodak Austral around the edges so that’s another way that we can

get some information out.

Photographers’ imprints.

Now in early photography, being that little bit more expensive it tended to be the realm

of studio photographers.

People would have to go into the studio, sit for the photo, that kind of thing.

These photo studios were shameless advertisers and they more often than not included their

name and their business on their wares.

So we can get a lot from this information.

Unfortunately it doesn’t tell us anything about the sitter or usually doesn’t but

you can find information out about the studio name, the location and possibly a sitter number.

So if the image is sitter number 5 that would indicate it’s very early in this studio’s

career so you could perhaps run a Trove search for the studio name.

You might be able to find out when they opened, when they closed, find out a rough date range

of that studio and then be able to place that photo if you’ve got a sitter number, place

it somewhere in their business chronology.

So as I said doing a Trove search for something like Bond and Co like you can see on the left

here might turn up some interesting results.

So moving on let’s investigate the image.

We’ve looked at the photo as an object but now we’re going to have a look into the

image.

So photographic studios, we were just talking about them, let’s have a look at what they

can tell you.

So close examination of props and the way that subjects are standing can give us an

idea of the date of a photo and where it might have been taken.

Early photography required the subject to stand still for a number of seconds which

can get a little hard if you’re trying to stand there very still for a long time.

So early photographic studios used props so people could steady themselves.

On the left we see a very stiff and staid pose from the two in the photos.

Lady is sitting down, the gentleman is standing up but you can see he's bracing himself on

her chair so he doesn’t wobble all over the place.

Gentleman on the right perhaps taking a bit of a cavalier approach, standing by himself

reading a book but I think he’s doing a pretty good job there.

Studio backgrounds started with very plain backgrounds but with substantial furniture

props so you can see both of these are fairly plain in the background.

The gentleman on the left has a nice table there with barley sugar-turned legs there.

In the following decades however backdrops became more elaborate and the subjects took

on more of a casual pose as photography improved.

In the late 1800s and early 1900s we see more ornate backgrounds so the little girl on the

right here as a kind of Grecian, I don’t know an Etruscan kind of temple in the background,

very fancy.

The gentleman on the left I guess are trying to portray that they’re outdoors.

We can see that there’s grass around them, upping the game of studio photography backdrops.

Now outfits, clothing.

Hopefully everyone in your photo are wearing clothes and dating outfits is a fun way that

we can use to help us date a photo.

It’s not as accurate as some other methods but it can be pretty fun.

Those with a keen eye for detail can accurately pinpoint 19th century and early 20th century

clothing down to within five or 10 years by recognising different components or a particular

look that was in Vogue.

Perhaps the photos you have are of well to-do ancestors who had the means to be able to

keep up with the latest fashions and you have them in their most glamourous attire there,

haute couture.

Photographs during this period were special affairs so the subjects often wore their best

outfits however only those with a good income could keep up with the latest fashion.

Those who were of less well-off means tended to dress less fashionably because they just

didn’t have the money to be constantly updating their wardrobes, they made their own clothes

or when buying new clothes they prioritised practicality over fashion.

Older people in photos were slower to change fashion and tended to hang onto clothes and

it’s also worth noting that if the photograph took place in Australia they may have been

several years behind the fashions of Europe.

But using the fashion of subjects to date photos can provide us with the earliest date

that a photograph might have been taken so let’s have a quick whizz through some fashion

styles and we’ll see if we can spot some of the information we can pick up.

So men’s outfits, it’s only dateable to about a decade or so.

Male modes of dress reflected a more subtle shift.

It usually was things like a subtle shift in tailor, slow-changing features such as

neckwear, fashions in facial hair, that kind of thing and the appearance or loss of certain

garments.

So looking at the gentlemen in the photo they're wearing the same kind of suits you might see

out today with a few tailoring alterations but looking at men’s clothes, look for things

like the cravats, the bowties, the ties even, fob watches, those things tended to come in

and out of fashion and change and are more accurate ways of dating male fashion because

these were easier to update rather than buying a whole suit.

Dating female attire is a little easier because women’s dress went through a succession

of more distinct changes and more dateable styles through the 19th and early 20th centuries,

especially around things like the changing silhouette formed by corsets, bustles, crinolines,

those kinds of things.

In addition to the silhouette things like sleeves, dress length, they can give us another

place to start our dating process.

For 20th century dress length most importantly and I will say always judge dating the fashion

in a photo by the younger women in a photo if possible.

Older people as I said tended to be more conservative, they tended to hang onto things for longer

and the younger people, if they could afford it, tended to be more on top of what was fashionable

at the time.

Children’s dress echoed adult clothing for the most part but it did follow some of its

own conventions but it can be a little more difficult to pinpoint precisely.

That being said it’s still possible to gain a reasonable date range from a photo, especially

combined with other dating methods.

Keep in mind though that up until the early 1920s dresses were still the standard uniform

for young boys and girls alike so if you have a photo that you think might be from that

period of a younger person you may not automatically be able to presume gender just by the fact

that they’re wearing a dress.

So very quickly I’m going to run through a couple of decades starting in the 1850s

to see how fashion evolved and pick up on some of the key styles that you might be able

to find to help you pinpoint a date and therefore be able to perhaps put a person in a particular

photo at a particular time.

So for gentlemen take note of things like neck wear, facial hair, width of lapels, buttons.

For female fashion take note of the silhouette, if they’re wearing crinolines, bustles,

the sleeve shape, the waist height, hair length and the skirt length as well.

So 1850s for gentlemen facial hair was generally in, definitely for older gentlemen.

The man on the right is a little bit younger.

But you can see these big boxy coats, they’re both wearing a very similar style of coat,

very popular in the 1850s for gentlemen.

For women crinoline so the hooped skirts creating that big full Victorian look, very common.

So too was this over the shoulder shawl-looking style.

1860s, whiskers very much the fashion, clean-shaven faces very, very rare.

This big bushy look was very much in.

You can see also the ladies here wearing their crinoline skirts as well.

So the 1860s for women, the crinoline again still very dominant, the style hasn’t changed

much from the 1850s.

Moving on for gentlemen, side whiskers become shorter but the mutton chop was still very

much in.

The gentlemen on the left a little bit older with mighty mutton chops.

The gentleman on the right here, bit younger but you can still see he’s got that style

happening as well.

For the ladies, more elaborate ornamentation started appearing on dresses.

This coincided with the introduction of the sewing machine, making it more economical

to introduce more elaborate designs into these dresses.

The 1880s, whiskers again dropping in popularity.

The gentleman on the left clean-shaven but the gentleman on the right still with this

big bushy beard.

Would not look out of place perhaps in Melbourne or Sydney these days, that look, I don’t

think.

In the 1880s for women the bustle was very popular, that padded undergarment that gave

the dress that very distinct flow out the back.

That was very much the style at the time.

So the 1890s, many men embraced the walrus moustache.

You can see here both walrus moustaches in varying degrees of evolution but you can see

the neck tie they’re wearing, almost a cravat, almost a very widely tied tie and their mode

of dress is very similar despite the obvious age gap we have here.

In the 1890s for women hourglass-shape silhouettes start to emerge with corsets becoming more

and more popular.

1900s, collars very, very high.

At the beginning of the 1900s collars were very high but as the decade progressed collars

got lower and lower.

For women the 1900s, very early 1900s are more – I don’t know, perhaps a more feminine

style with more lace and floral and things like that start to appear.

1910s so just before the war, clean-shaven faces were back in fashion and especially

post-war clean-shaven faces definitely in fashion.

Hair very short, very neatly trimmed.

For women in the 1910s more elaborate outfits so the early 1910s we’re talking the Titanic,

that kind of era, lace flowing but as the decade progressed and of course the war and

after the war, dresses became plainer, very much practical during and after the war.

In the 1920s men’s fashion started to relax, suits still very much the go but fashion relaxing,

hair still short and we start to see this introduction of the fedora look, the classic

1920s look.

For women outfits became less fitted and we start seeing shorter hair in women as well

and skirts getting shorter as well.

The 1930s, fedora hats definitely the hat of choice, hair still very neatly cropped

but the tie is now very much more aligned with how we would wear ties these days, smaller

knot, more conservative, I guess.

The 1930s for women so skirts become longer again and the waistline returning to a normal

waist position.

We also see the kind of iconic cloche hat here very much coming into style at that time.

So that’s a very, very quick visual journey from 1850 through to 1930, it is not a comprehensive

overview of fashions at that time but hopefully it might give you a little bit of an example

on how you can start dating fashion.

Something else so we’ve got the fashion but of course hairstyles.

With gentlemen facial hair tended to come in and out of fashion so you could date it

by that.

For women the hairstyle changes were much more noticeable so there are a number of resources

both in the Library and on the wider internet to put a chronological order on different

types of hairstyles throughout Australia, Britain, United States, things like that so

have a look online for those and you can try and match sample styles to a hairstyle you

might see.

Age is another way that we can date photos so not the age of the photo but the age of

people within the photo so you can usually distinguish different generations in a photo,

grandparents, parents, children and oftentimes the children are arranged in age order which

is sometimes the height order but I’m sure you might know in your own family that’s

not necessarily the case.

So determining the age can be difficult just by going off the subjects’ appearance alone.

Also keep in mind depending on the time period we’re looking at and keeping in mind the

family’s income and their I guess we would say societal position, I guess, people of

less well-off means may look a lot older than they were, having to work in factories and

in the fields rather than people who were more well off and didn’t have that quite

as the manual labour side of things so that’s something to take into account as well.

Also if you know an individual in the photo and you know their - even a vague age range,

perhaps when they died or how old they are now you can count back to what approximate

age they might have been in that photo as well.

Weddings, who doesn’t love a wedding?

Weddings are popular occasions for photos, were and still are, of course and they are

a real treasure to have in the family photo album.

Wedding photos can help us identify individuals or refine a date range, especially if you’ve

delved into your family history research and are kind of aware of who may have got married,

when and where.

In the mid-1800s the royal brides popularised the white wedding dress which would go on

to become the staple in wedding photos.

It also became a bit of an indicator of the class in inverted commas of the bride in question,

how fancy was it?

How close to the actual royal wedding dress was it?

As we get into the later 19th century women tended to get married – those who couldn’t

afford a white wedding dress tended to get married in their best dress which could be

of any colour, it could be something that could be repurposed for their Sunday best,

other parties, things like that.

It wasn’t uncommon for women to get married in their going away outfits so they could

have the wedding and leave straight away on their honeymoon.

So having a look at these images you can see very different, we have a black dress on the

left, a white dress on the right but you can date things like bouquets, veils, what flowers

were in fashion when so these photos are a little bit later.

As I said wedding dresses were very much informed by inverted commas high society, the royal

brides so if you have a photo you think is from around a particular area have a look

to see which royal brides got married, see if a dress matches that and you might be able

to place a broad date.

Military.

I am not going into depth about military uniforms and insignia, do not have time for that today,

unfortunately but we do have other webinars here at the Library that do go into that a

little bit more but dating military photos can have fairly precise results.

So determining which armed conflict can help narrow down a date range and then by extension

which family relations were likely to have served in that particular conflict and who

that particular subject might be.

So the colourful uniforms of the colonial forces so the red coat look were replaced

in 1903 or thereabouts with the standardised pattern khaki, the drab olive, and new badges

and buttons were used to distinguish regiments and corps and of course the iconic slouch

that was included as head gear as well.

The Australian War Memorial has some great blogs on dating features of uniforms including

nurses’ uniforms from different periods and we’ll include the links to those blogs

beneath the YouTube video of today’s recording as well.

So while fashion will not provide you with a definitive date it is another important

clue to establishing a realistic timeframe of when a photo might be taken.

So that’s the people in the photo.

What else is in the image?

So having covered what the subjects in the image are wearing let’s turn our attention

to what’s in the background so there are tons of details you can get from the background

of the photo.

So perhaps you’ve got a series of photos in albums taken at the same place or of the

same family.

You will get to know certain locations, perhaps it’s a garden, perhaps it’s a family estate

that’s changed or been added to or burnt down and rebuilt, things like that, gardens,

trees, you can get a lot from that.

So let’s look at the buildings in the photo so building architecture.

So looking at the exterior of a house can give us clues to when it was built, of course.

So on this slide is a very broad overview of the kind of architectural periods in Australia.

There are a range of useful resources around architecture, again the National Library has

webinars online devoted to dating your house and other buildings.

But comparing when the building might have been built can again give us that earliest

date a photo might have been taken.

There is a link included in this slide, it will be included in YouTube as well.

Wikipedia gets a lot of bad press but this particular page has quite an exhaustive list

of architectural styles and substyles throughout Australian history for both private residential

dwellings and public buildings as well, it is a very useful resource.

Motor vehicles.

So getting a car was a source of pride for many families and often a good excuse to take

some family photos next to the brand new car.

It’s still a thing today.

So identifying the model of car, the year of the car can give us a good starting point

for when the photo might have been taken.

It might also give you some interesting insights in your family as well, how much did this

car cost?

Is it bought new?

Is it likely second-hand?

Was it a common item at the time or perhaps your family was the first family in town to

get a motor car.

Now that would have been exciting.

So not only identifying the model of car, the type of car but also the number plate

of a car as well.

So to confirm the date, if you can make out the number plate you can find out which state

it was registered in and what the style was at the time for those number plates.

So there’s a number of online resources so this is Wikipedia again, it shows you examples

of all the states’ different historic number plates, the current ones, the Victorian number

plates.

I remember them being green when I was a kid, now they’re blue.

New South Wales yellow, now they’re black or you can get all different types of styles.

Knowing those types of things can help you pinpoint when that car might have been bought

or the photo taken.

Alright, building signs.

So we’ve had a look at the private spaces, we’ve looked at houses, family albums, things

like that but chances are some of your family albums might include snapshots of town or

a street, things like that.

So moving into that public sphere we can get a bit of an idea of the times again.

So most streets, high streets might include building signs, billboards, things like that

so it can not only help identify a particular town if that’s in question but a date as

well.

So building and business signs will indicate which businesses were operating when and where

at the time of the photo so what you can do is search for a business name in Trove, do

a wider Trove search or perhaps do a Trove search for digital newspapers and help you

find advertisements from that business in a particular timeframe or perhaps you’ll

find a business that the photo’s taken in one part of town but you might find that in

1920 the business moved to another part of town so you can gauge your photo’s date

range from there as well.

Now the next thing, telegraph poles.

Now this was something completely new to me before I was looking at this webinar.

It’s a unique dating method but again one that shocked me.

Poles and wires can give us a bit of an idea of when a photo was taken so Australia used

a number of different telegraph poles throughout history so their value is greatest from the

period from 1880 through to about 1920.

Since before 1880 wires were rare and after the 1920s cars tend to be a better dating

guide.

So the first step in dating a pole is to identify the route it took and what service it most

likely provided.

So wires were erected at different times for telegraphs, telephones, electrical distribution,

high-voltage transmission and tram rounds.

In the case of telegraph routes the styles changed significantly, you can see here on

the left.

But once erected the pole routes changed very little so only an earliest possible date can

be established on these.

Let's go back and have a look at the broader streetscapes here so we’ve got building

signs, we’ve got telegraph poles here, we’ve got vehicles so knowing specific town or street

will provide of course the most accurate results but I’ve got a quick example here of how

we can see the changes throughout the decades that we can pick up on through different photos

from different eras.

So this is a range of photos showing Elizabeth Street in Sydney so the first one is from

1911 so that’s the one we have on the screen here.

We’ve got horse and carts, we have tramlines - you can just see a tram way up in the back

distance but there’s not many - telegraph poles everywhere and you can even tell by

the style of dress about what time period we’re looking at here.

If we move thorough to the next image we have Elizabeth Street but in the 1930s so we still

have tram tracks but there are many, many more trams here, there are motorcars where

there were none before.

You can just see turning around the corner about midway in the image we have horse and

cart so it’s still around but not nearly as much as the image we were looking at just

before.

So of course it’s a long street so we’re going to have some different perspectives

but same street, different styles.

So let’s move on another 20 years in the 1950s.

So motorcars very much the go here, you can see a double-decker bus up the back, no horse

and carts, no trams but it’s also very easy to see female fashion in this image as well

so again going back to dating photos by fashion are going to come into play here as well.

Let's jump forward a large amount to 1986 so colour photography, whacko.

So it is in colour so popular in the ‘60s and thereafter, many more cars so again you

can see number plates very clearly here.

Building signs.

You might just be able to make out on the Davis Armstrong sign top middle, you can see

a telephone number.

So knowing when telephone numbers changed into longer digits can also be a useful way

to date the age of a photograph.

So I know that was a big jump but we can see how the same street has changed very much

over time.

So other less common things you could use to date photos would be things like railways

and trains, did that line run through there at that time?

Is that line now closed?

What type of engine is it?

Railway gauge even, things like that.

Ships, style of ships change, I guess so we have ferries here, the wharf in Hobart, we

have a cat picture here.

You can’t get on the internet without seeing a picture of a cat.

But you have a zoomed-in image here showing this trading vessel here with the decorative

bow on it with the little tender next to it, can give us an idea of the time we’re looking

at here.

Different events are also going to be helpful so the one on the left is the Sydney Harbour

Bridge opening ceremony so if there’s a picture of that in an album you could date

the photos around it in that same era.

We have images of crowds greeting the Queen when she arrived in 1954 so using images of

public figures can be useful so we’ve got a young-looking Queen Elizabeth here so public

figures will have many portraits of them so you can gauge how old they are in your photo

to what year that might have been in their life perhaps.

Cricket matches, who was playing, who was playing for a particular team at that time,

and major national events as well.

So I have talked about dating the photos that you already have but perhaps what you might

want to do is you might want to have a look for a particular photo, see if a particular

photo exists of your ancestor or your hometown, something like that so I’m going to run

through a crash course on how to find those things using the resources we have here at

the National Library.

So I’m going to jump through to the National Library of Australia’s homepage which is

NLA.gov.au.

It’s very simple, if you just Google NLA or National Library of Australia we will be

the first result.

So this is our homepage.

If you scroll down you will have our search our collection catalogue bar here so this

is your gateway into the National Library’s collection.

So all you need to do is use keywords so whether it’s your hometown, whether it’s your

family name even or a business just type that in.

We do have a large collection here, we have over a million photos here at the National

Library of Australia but the fact of the matter is we may not have a photo of your great-grandfather

or your great-great-grandfather, it may not happen but what we will have are photographs

from the area that they are from and from the time period in which they lived.

So I'm going to use a personal example so I grew up in Victoria, my home town is Ballarat

so I know that in the catalogue there is not a photo of my great-grandfather but I do know

he lived in Ballarat in the 1930s.

So let’s type in Ballarat as a search example, hit the enter key or the search button, you

will see that in the National Library’s catalogue we have 4,353 results for Ballarat.

I don’t have time to go through all of those as much as I would like but I’m looking

for photographs about what my family’s life might have been like.

Using the narrow search field down on the right-hand side we’re going to narrow down

our results by all online.

This means it doesn’t matter where you are in Australia or overseas you can still access

these things because they have been digitised and I’m also looking for pictures so I’m

going to click the picture button here.

So you can see we’ve gone down to 459.

Still a lot but a bit more manageable.

As I said my great-grandad was living in Ballarat in the 1930s so let’s narrow it down to

that as well.

You can see here narrow search, we’ve narrowed it down to all pictures from the 1930s that

are online on the National Library’s catalogue.

We’ve got 34, I’m okay with 34 pictures.

So you can see the most common result here is from a collection by Frank Hurley, photos

taken between 1910 and 1962 so all of these images are quite familiar to me.

So I can look through.

If we click on the thumbnail which is the image here it will take you directly to the

image in our Trove viewer.

So for those of you familiar with Trove you will know how this works.

For those of you who are not, Trove, you can move the photo around, you can zoom in, the

photos are usually in very high definition so you can zoom in and out.

So this is a photo of Sturt Street looking up to the Ballarat Town Hall here some time

I’d say the late ‘30s perhaps.

So you can date by - I know that some of these buildings are still here, some of them are

very much not.

This building is now a 1960s style bank so I know it’s definitely not after the ‘60s.

You can also download an image from Trove using the functions down here, you can download

a jpeg which is your standard image file and download it directly to your computer which

is very, very useful, hit the back button and then you can continue on through the results

that you’ve got as well.

So that’s one example.

The search results come up because these photos have been tagged with the word Ballarat or

the word Melbourne or the word Sydney.

There will be images that will slip through the search of course so it can help to start

out very, very broad.

So for example you can use the word portrait.

If you use the inverted commas here it will look for things specifically tagged with that

word so 94,000 results for portrait, narrow things down to online and then narrow things

down to picture.

You’re going to get everything that’s tagged with the word portrait.

You can use the narrow down functions to narrow down your area further so perhaps you only

want portraits of actors, narrow it down through there.

So start broad and then narrow it down one by one.

Don’t launch straight in using very specific terms because it’s not likely to yield a

whole lot.

Something that we do have at the National Library that is very useful is the Fairfax

photo collection so there’s about 17,000 negatives documenting newsworthy and historical

events so this is the Fairfax newspaper negative collection.

So a quick search of Fairfax here, we can scroll down again online and then you can

see under series just down the side here we have the Fairfax archive of glass plate negatives

and it's making a liar out of me because we actually have 18,003.

So if we click on the series it will only give you the results that are included in

that series so these are all digitised so we can click through and then we can view

so just for those again who may not have seen that.

So you can click through an image so Don Bradman, click.

In theory, if it wants to work.

There we go.

If we scroll down again, right down the bottom, National Library digitised item and that will

open up for us again when the internet’s going to work.

It’s being a bit slow today.

It will open up into that Trove viewer that we were looking at before.

This is very odd but I guess not that odd for the internet.

So I apologise for that, you cannot always trust the computer.

Try one more time.

Perhaps that’s not going to work.

So searching in our National Library catalogue you can find a lot of things but there are

things that you just may not be able to find.

If you can’t find something in particular in our catalogue broaden your search, the

resources you are using so I would suggest jumping back to our homepage here and then

under the catalogue search bar you can go to Trove.

Again for those of you who are familiar with Trove you know about it, you know that it

is a brilliant resource.

Let’s type in again Ballarat just because why not?

Trove will give you results, not just photos whereas in the National Library’s catalogue

we had about 4,500 we have about 100,000 results here.

Again it’s worth noting to click this available online button here, just run your search again.

This means again that if you are not in the National Library or you’re not where a particular

photo is stored you can still access it.

But you can see here our search for Ballarat online images has returned 3.2 million articles,

84,000 objects, 49,000 photographs, that’s all included in here as well but of course

newspapers, 3.1 million digitised newspapers which is huge.

Again for those of you who know Trove you can click through, you can read individual

newspapers, you can browse different newspapers, things like that.

I won’t get into that, there are many National Library recorded webinars where you can learn

the basics of using Trove and things like digital newspapers as well.

So I’m going to jump back to my PowerPoint and I'm going to call it a day as far as I'm

concerned but are there any questions from anyone?

RENEE: Actually we had many, many questions, Aaron, and really this has been such an engaged

audience.

I’d like to thank everyone who shared their tips and even offered recommendations on resources.

We have a lot of eagle-eyed people among our attendees today who said that they were spotting

other possibilities for identifying the clues in photos including things like street lights,

verandas on houses and many, many things and also the details they saw in ads.

So we have so many detectives in our audience, it’s been an absolute pleasure to answer

your questions.

One question that came up was quite a good one.

It seems that maybe the people aren’t as used to using Trove as usual so thank you

very much for doing that good demonstration.

If you have any more questions about using Trove you can always send us an ask a librarian

enquiry and that goes for any of the questions, any questions that might have popped up for

you today that you’d like a bit more information about.

There is one I’d like to answer before we move to the end, I know that we’re really

pressed for time but I’d just like to go back into the Library’s catalogue and the

question was how can you tell if an image is in copyright or not?

So I’m going to do a search for a portrait, one that I know exists.

I’m just going to start very broadly as Aaron did and these are my results.

They actually should all be digitised materials so what I can do is I can actually click on

any of these.

I think the internet is being very slow, I apologise for that because all of these should

have a thumbnail appear next to the image but for our purposes I can still show you

how to tell if an image is in copyright or not.

We simply click on the title, we go down to the bottom of the catalogue record.

We look at the copyright status tab which is really, really useful and it shows based

on the metrics of the expected creation date that can give a broad guideline on whether

it’s out of copyright or not.

Copyright’s quite a complex legal issue so what we would say is this is an indication

that it is out of copyright but almost all of the images that Aaron has featured today

are out of copyright.

When you view the recording of the webinar if you’d like to do that on Friday you’ll

be able to look at all of the links of the images and find them again in our catalogue.

Alright so let’s now go back to our presentation.

Questions, okay so we’ve mentioned ask a librarian.

This is a time when we always encourage you to ask questions.

You can Google NLA Ask a Librarian and we’ll be happy to get back to you by email.

Also thank you again for joining us today, as I said it’s been a really engaged group.

You might like to join us for upcoming webinars and we have one coming up on Canberra family

history on the 29th of April but in this webinar we’ll also feature techniques for searching

about family history clues in your location really wherever you are in Australia.

In May we have Tracing the History of your House so you can jump online onto the NLA

What’s on page and register for those right now.

Aaron mentioned that we have many previous webinar recordings and these are all ready

for you to watch wherever you are.

You can just Google NLA YouTube and you’ll be able to find our learning playlist.

So thank you again so much for joining us, it’s been a pleasure and until next time

happy researching.

Renee: For those of you who are just joining us, welcome to our webinar, Tiny Homes.

My name’s Renee and I'm a research librarian at the National Library of Australia.

I’ll just turn the camera off now so you can concentrate on the presentation.

Right well first I’d like to acknowledge the Ngunnawal and Ngambri people who are the

traditional custodians of the land on which this learning session is being held today.

I pay respect to their elders past, present and emerging.

I’d also like to acknowledge that this land holds structures of knowledge and learning

that have been practised for many generations.

Again welcome wherever you are.

In our learning webinars we bring research tips and techniques to help you become research-ready

at home.

When we talk about research we’re just talking about finding out more about a topic that

you’re interested in.

It isn’t something that only some people can do. If you have an interest or a particular

question and you need more information, then you’re ready to take the next step to find

out more, and that’s where the research journey begins.

Alright.

It’s a mini webinar so it’s the first time we’ve given a short format webinar

and it’s designed to be just tucked into your day.

But like life in a small home we can’t fit in everything, and we have to be well organised,

so we’ll start by looking at some basic search techniques.

The kind that’ll help you get started on your research journey, really whatever the

topic, and then we’ll use those research results to look at examples of small detached

homes that have been constructed in Australia starting in the 19th century, usually in times

of particular need.

So for example miners’ cottages during gold rushes and country dwellings for settlers

who were establishing farms.

We'll also touch briefly on the places people found to make a home in during really challenging

times, like the Great Depression and during the post World War 2 housing shortage.

Finally we’ll emerge into sunny light-filled homes in the 1950s. Okay so before we go further

I’d just like to clarify, what we’ll be talking about is a bit different from the

contemporary sense, tiny house.

The tiny house movement, I’m sure you’ve heard of it, it’s a relatively recent phenomenon

in Australia for people who are usually seeking affordable home ownership or independent living

or sustainable living or getting off the grid.

But we’ll be focusing on historical homes.The houses you can see at the moment on the screen

are Hemming’s portable houses for Australia and I included them just at this point of

clarification, because they’re really reminiscent to me of the style of some contemporary tiny

houses.

These were actually prefabricated corrugated iron houses manufactured in Bristol and sent

to Australia.Now let’s get onto the presentation properly.

Alright, so if you’re looking for resources on historical small homes in Australia how

do you find them?

Well let’s look at some techniques for how you can build on ideas of what kind of search

words you use.

And if you don’t get your search right the first time, don’t worry.

Try something else.

So let’s now do a live search in the catalogue, starting from the homepage.

Okay, here we are back on our homepage.

If I scroll down a little bit before this very important search box I’ll see some

other key resources.

The button to get to Trove, the button to get to our eResources, which are like subscription

databases, and the button to get to ‘get a library card’.

You can sign up, it’s free, we’ll send to you in Australia.

Once you get, it you can go back to eResources, log in and look at some subscription databases

for your research.

If you get stuck along the way, contact us at Ask a Librarian. Okay so now let’s start

our search.

So how hard can it be?

It seems like if we do small houses, “small house”, that should be a logical place to

start. We'll see.

I usually like to start broadly and then narrow it down to become more specific.

So I’ll do a search.

Right, so not too many research results, but I can see already that some of these are just

not useful, not relevant to my research.

We have some works by Anthony Trollope.

This I’m sure will be very interesting, but we’re looking at historical homes and

we have some Canadian material as well, and I want Australian material. Okay so what am

I going to do?

There’s this nifty Narrow Search menu on the right-hand side and what you can do is

select by clicking on a link, you can really select what you want to have shown in your

search results.

So I’m going to go down to subject area, I’m going to click on Australian because

I only want to see results that are related to Australia.

I’ll now have a look at these results, okay, small house living.

Again contemporary small houses.

They look really interesting but not what I’m looking for at the moment.

We have some online resources and I’ve already checked these, and I can tell you these are

archived websites – well these two are definitely about contemporary movements.

This one’s a very interesting one but we won’t be visiting it now.

I guess what I'm seeing is that I’m not seeing as many historical materials as I might

have expected.

So what do we do when a search doesn’t give us the results we need?

Well we try something else.

My colleague, Sue, who is a research whizz always says start with what you know.

There’s inspiration all around you if you need further ideas about what words you use

to do a search.

Now for me, I grew up in the Hunter Valley, it’s also been traditionally a mining centre.

So one type of historical home is the miner’s cottage and that got me thinking about search

terms.

Miner’s cottage or miner’s house.

I do know that miners with or without their families have had to make their homes wherever

they needed to be to make their livelihoods.

Alright, so that might be a good lead. Let's change small house to “miner’s house”.

These are looking promising, okay, I like the look of this one, let’s click this one.

A unique older tiny home.

So you can see what I did there was I clicked on the thumbnail image, because that told

me that that’s something I could view in a larger format and in this case it’s the

Trove viewer.

The Trove viewer is great because you can zoom in for more detail, you can zoom out

again.

You can use these selections on the left-hand side to download a low-resolution image.

You can purchase a high-resolution image from our Copies Direct service.

You can use this button up here to cite it if you wanted to include that in some of your

research work.

Alright so I can see that I think that I’m on the right track.

There’s something else I notice about this image.

I remember that this is called a slab hut, I believe.

So now that’s another idea I have for searching. So I’m going to do that search now.

You can see that searches are built on serendipitous discoveries and you set a sense of when you’re

going in the right direction, or when there’s something you hadn’t thought about that

you can then pursue.

Alright so slab hut.

This time I’m not going to use the inverted commas.

I used the inverted commas because I wanted to narrow the number of search results I got.

For example small house, I didn’t want everything that had small in the title or in the description

and everything that had house in the description, I just wanted to see results that included

small house as a phrase.

But slab hut, I guess it’s a unique phrase and I think I’m less likely to get voluminous

results.

Alright and here we are.

Again some really promising results.

[sigh] Is it what I’m looking for?

Well, let’s see.

Before we move on, I’d like to draw your attention to one of my favourite links in

the whole catalogue, and it’s this one on the right-hand side.

Again I’ve gone through to the Narrow Search menu and I’ve gone to NLA digital material.

Now when I click on that I know that what I'm going to be seeing is things that are

in our Library’s collection that have been digitised, and in most cases I can view them

at home, wherever I am, and that’s what I want to do.

So I’m going to click on that.

In this case many of the results already were digitised but I’ve still brought that result

number down a little bit further.

Alright, well I’m getting some great results for historical small homes and feeling encouraged.

Oh actually there’s one more step I’d like to show you.

We haven’t done subject area in this one yet, and I can see that this is also sparking

some ideas for me.

Hill End, okay.

Buildings, structures, photographs.

Hill End I believe was a mining town.

Its goldrush boom period was from I think 1850s to 1870s, so that might be another great

resource for finding small homes, small historical structures.

Let's click on it.

Yes and this is looking like the kind of thing I’d really like to pursue further.

Lots of social conditions for the people living in them, I’m seeing families.

Before we take a closer look let me just review the search pathway that brought us here.

I’ll just go back to the presentation for a moment.

Alright so I started with “small house” with inverted commas to find that phrase.

That didn’t work so well so I changed direction, I went to “miner’s house” and that was

more promising.

From that point I got the idea of searching for slab huts, so in that case a kind of house.

And then that result led me to a further subject which was a place.

So in just those few searches I could really start to refine the search areas I wanted

to pursue.

In the Narrow Search menu I also used the subject filter and the NLA digital material

filter.

Okay so let’s return to see the fruits of these search results.

These images, I’ve just extracted a few from the list, they all come from the Holtermann

archive of Merlin and Bayliss photographic prints of New South Wales and Victoria.

It’s an album containing about a thousand loose photographs and other loose photographs.

It includes subjects – gold mining and building in the Hill End and Gulgong areas.

These are still Hill End images, we can see that people are making their life in these

small homes.

She has window panes which must have been really helpful at that time for keeping out

flies and things like that that.

Then we move to Gulgong.

So Gulgong was another goldrush town.

Its rush began in 1870 and within a year of that first finding of gold it had a population

of 10,000 people, so you can imagine how quickly houses were put up under those circumstances.

This is actually showing the chemist, the druggist and the doctor.

It’s not a dwelling but it is an instance of a shared space and it shows you some of

the resources that people had to use at those times.

Alright so now we go to our treehouse search.

I discovered these interesting works by a photographer called Nicholas Caire.

So between 1875 and 1905 Caire explored the Victorian countryside to explore landscapes

for the commercial market so he sold his images.

But he also really liked nature.

The treehouse images that he took are curiosities.

Remember he was selling these images, so they might be used for postcards. But this third

image is really typical of his landscapes, in which people are dwarfed by the scale of

the trees around them and people often seem very remote in his images.

Caire himself was a believer in the power of pursuing good health in nature, far from

the city.

I think we can really see that in that image.

Alright, I also did a search, expanding my search to settlers’ housing and I found

a book, Outback Homes and How to Build Them from 1926.

It was produced by the New Settlers’ League of Australia.

This was a group that supported new settlers of agricultural land and this particular book

gives advice on what a new settler should bring.

It says, before leaving the city he should provide himself with a tent and a fly, he

will need a two-quart billy and frying pan.

Also an axe and a spade and a pair of army blankets.

A well-made hurricane lamp is essential and may be obtained at any country store.

So that’s all he had to start with. In the image on the right up here we can see the

stages in which the orchardist’s homestead was established in Shepparton.

He started small and got bigger.

He started with a tent, got settled and found someone who was willing to share that life.

Actually this is a well appointed tent, it has a brass bed and other furnishings inside.

Four years later the homestead is built, still I think quite a small home.

Later still the tent has a roof constructed over it.

Never lose a good tent.

Twelve years later the homestead is finally established and if you look in very tiny letters

at the bottom it says The Reward of Grit.

Yes indeed.

So I did another search using a synonym this time for house, cabin, and that yielded this

stereographic image, Bushland Cabin in Tasmania by Frank Hurley.

A stereograph is made up of two pictures.

You can see them placed next to each other and they’re usually viewed with a set of

special lenses known as a stereoscope.

Now these two images were taken about eye width apart, so maybe about 7cm.

The left picture represents what the left eye would see, and the right is what the right

eye would see.

So when you look at them through a stereoscope the images have a three-dimensional effect.

Now we can’t duplicate that view but I used an app to make a gif of the two images, so

you can get a sense of its dimensional effect, and it’s kind of nice.

It sort of brings it alive, it animates it.

Being resourceful.

So during the Great Depression domestic building activities effectively stopped.

Building companies went bankrupt, tradesmen lost their jobs, many unemployed families

lost homes either because they couldn’t make payments or pay their rent, so we’re

moving into quite a prolonged time of housing where it was real hardship in finding homes.

The 1933 Commonwealth census for dwellings showed that over 350,000 people lived in dwellings

where the material on the outer walls like this one were made of iron, bark, hessian,

calico and canvas.

So in other words scavenged and self-assembled materials.

So the family in this image in Kurnell near Sydney found their home in a cave.

I look at that cliff face and I just can’t imagine living there with a young child.

What a difficult time it must have been.

There you can see that they’ve actually got a door attached to the inside of the cave

structure.

Of course this level of hardship wasn’t the case for all families but it was certainly

a time when people needed to be resourceful.

Here's another example of that resourcefulness.

In the Australian Home Beautiful magazine in 1930 was an article about a retired tram

engineer in Victoria, and he purchased three tram cars and turned them into a house.

Believe it or not he wasn’t alone.

He got that idea from an earlier article in that magazine about a woman who had also built

a home from three tram cars in Sydney.

So there were at least two of these kind of houses around.

Now you can all see the lovely inside, it looks a little bit like a caravan, a really,

really lovely caravan.

I think it would be fair to say, how did I find this?

Now this magazine, unlike the other images I’ve been showing you, it hasn’t been

digitised, so unfortunately it isn’t online.

I found the article by looking at physical copies from the depression years and then

I looked for signs of this kind of creative reuse of structures.

But we do have extensive holdings of many older Australian publications, so if you’re

looking for something that one of them contains, contact us through our Ask a Librarian service

and we can do a look-up for you, and talk about options for how you can get a copy, if

that’s something you’re interested in.

Okay.

Now what surprised me overall about the images that reveal housing hardship is that it wasn’t

only during the depression years.

This image of a woman living in makeshift housing in a settlement in Newcastle was taken

in 1949, and that was really surprising to me.

There were many makeshift settlements in other cities as well, but at the end of the second

world war there was a widespread housing shortage and during the war industry and materials

had been directed to the war effort and after the war there was this rapid population growth,

there was a shortage of materials and labour and the resettlement of returned servicemen

and women.

It really took time for industries to be able to recommence manufacturing and for restrictions

to be lifted on domestic construction and consumption.

So during the second world war governments had been planning for post-war recovery with

a view to better planning cities and houses so that people would have healthier living

standards.

There were many voices that urged this.

This is just one publication called We Must Go On, a study in planned reconstruction in

housing.

It argued that beyond planning houses just as built units, they should also be considered

as elements of a broader base unit, that being the neighbourhood with planned public spaces.

The federal government established the Department of Post War Reconstruction which researched

housing and planning options as well.

This is the cover of a book by Walter Bunning called Homes in the Sun.

He was an architect and designer and, responding to the unhealthy housing conditions he witnessed

in city tenement buildings, he wrote a significant work, Homes in the Sun, in which among many

other things he proposed house plans that were designed to let in as much sunlight as

possible.

He called them suntrap houses.

In the links at the end of today I can provide some links to Trove articles which show images

of Walter Bunning’s suntrap houses.

Alright so modernist housing principles were coming into focus where houses would be built

in new planned subdivisions.

In the post war period there were still shortages of bricks and terracotta tiles, so it was

actually the perfect time for new house styles to develop.

The kind of houses that would be built in these subdivisions would have flat, sloping

rooves, unadorned walls and expanses of glass to let in clean air and sunlight and we’ll

see more of those soon.

It was also the time of the rise of homebuilders and workplace housing plans wherever there

was need in Australia.

We began our talk with miners’ houses, well let’s revisit miners later in the mid-20th

century.

In Mt Isa in 1954 mining workers and their families also had to find housing solutions

for families, and you can read more about those accounts in MIMAG, which is the Mt Isa

Mines Ltd magazine.

Here you can read about a huge demand for houses.

We’re just going to open up a copy in the Trove viewer again.

This article, Houses By The Hundred.

It talks about a solution at this time was to establish cooperative building societies

and thanks to that a hundred homes were able to be built in a year.

So how did other people get affordable plans for houses in this time of great change?

Well the Royal Victorian Institute of Architects introduced a small homes service in 1947.

People could buy plans for architect-designed homes for a small cost.

The New South Wales Small Homes Service opened in 1953 and there’s some of the images you

can see now.

It was run in conjunction with the Australian Home Beautiful and here is a range of the

plans available.

The houses were designed to be affordable and have good design.

Alright, so if you were lucky enough to have secured your small precious home the next

step is to make it your own beautiful space, and paint companies started to develop new

colours and provided advice on the best way to use them, depending on what kind of house

you had and how big the rooms were.

So here’s an ad for Dulux high gloss paint from 1954 and I’m trying to look really

carefully.

I'm wondering what she’s reading.

Well I love to animate the past and I can show you exactly what she was reading because

we have a copy of the real brochure in our ephemera collection and we can look inside

too.

Alright so here are some scanned images from inside that brochure.

When you look at the original what strikes me is that the colours are so bright and the

pages are so clean.

We get used to the patina of age in old paper, but not so in this case, it’s been looked

after so well and it has tips for painting inside and outside with special tips if you

have a smaller home.

So here you have a selection of smaller homes.

They’ve called some of them holiday homes as well but often people used those plans

to live in.

And their solution is that if you have a smaller home, you can make it look bigger by having

a light colour in the back and have a bold trim colour around the shutters and the gutters

and things like that.

Now here’s some advice from Australian House and Garden.

So they’re actually suggesting something a little bit different, they’re suggesting

that you can refresh homes by giving them a more striking colour of paint on the outside.

I guess it just depends on which publication you are reading, and depending on which advice

you would like to take.

In the interests of bringing colour from the past, I’ve included some images of swatches

from 1955 to help you imagine how these bright fabrics might have added a finishing touch

to your cherished small home and again that’s from the Australian Home Beautiful in 1955.

We'll be ending the meeting soon, but I just wanted to say that if you have any questions

about research you can email us at our Ask a Librarian service or give us a call, simply

Google NLA, Ask a Librarian.

For our upcoming webinar we have finding and dating photographs.

That will be on the 15th of April and that’s all about finding the clues in photographs

that will help you determine the date of a photo.

If you’re interested in one of our past topics, we have so many recorded webinars

that are ready for you to watch right now on the Library’s YouTube channel, just Google

NLA YouTube.

Okay well look, thank you so much for joining us.

It’s been a pleasure, I hope you found something interesting.

If you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact us.

I hope you enjoy the rest of your day and happy researching.

Cathie: Well good afternoon everyone, or good morning it may be in one or two places.

Welcome to the Trove preview. I'll just stop the video before I commence the

webinar. So, I'd like to begin by acknowledging the Ngunnawal and Ngambri

people, who are the Traditional Custodians of the land on which this

webinar is being held, and pay respects to their Elders both past and present.

I pay my respects to the Elders of other communities in Australia and extend this

respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in attendance

today. As an Australian I value the opportunity to acknowledge Country as a

simple act of reconciliation. I trust that the acknowledgement and respect it

invokes resonates with many here today. So again, welcome, and it's been an

absolute delight to learn about all the weather around the country. All the areas

of rain. Well that's just wonderful isn't it? So, without further ado, I will get

going. So what is our Trove Preview webinar? This is preparing you for a

sneak peek at the upgraded Trove. The site you're going to see from

14th February is very much under construction, but we wanted to give you a

chance to explore it. It's an opportunity for you to get started with the site

before we launch in late June. This Preview will allow you to explore what's

changed, what has remained the same, and give you a chance to start getting

comfortable with the 2020 version of Trove. After the Preview closes, we will

have screenshots available, written guides and recorded webinars that we're

going to keep sharing with you up until launch. These will be publicised on

Facebook and Twitter, so please follow us to stay up to date. Now I will

say there will be a demonstration coming up, presented

by the lovely Cheney, so we'll wait for that, but a few details before we get to

that point. So the when and where of the Preview. The Preview is open

from Friday the 14th of February until Monday February the 24th. But February

the 14th is not only Valentine's Day but it's actually Library Lovers Day and

this year the theme for Library Lovers Day is "Uncover Something New", and we

thought this was particularly fitting to show off some of the new aspects of

Trove. Again I reiterate: the reason it's only open for a short period of time is

because the site is still under construction and not finished. It will be

back to work for us as we prepare to get the site ready for that June

launch. Now, how do you get to the site when it happens on the 14th? Well there's

going to be a Preview link on the Trove homepage, the Newspapers Browse page and

also the Search Results page. It's going to look like this. When you click the

link it will open the new pages in the current window. So if you don't often

visit those pages please do so between the 14th and 24th of February, so

you'll be able to get access to the Preview site. And once you click on the

link - drumroll - what will you see? Something like this. You can use the link

to access this new site, which we're going to demonstrate very soon. And it

will take you to here, but then once you've finished, you need to, you can

click on the yellow banner at the top here to head back to new Trove. If you want

to actually see the two versions of Trove side-by-side, you will need to do

this by having two browser windows open at the same time. And I encourage

you to do that, because it could be quite interesting. And remind, I remind that

anyone can access the Preview between those two dates of 14th to the 24th of

February. And let me tell you a little bit about this site that we have been

working on. What's new? All these new things have been requests from the Trove

community for several years. And let me tell you a little bit about them. There's

going to be new content on what we describe as landing pages. This content

will cover things specific to First Australians, how to explore Trove, the

different categories of content in Trove, an area to do with the Trove community and

an area also to do with research and that, and that's specifically in relation

to kind of big data research, which is a very big aspect of Trove. These new pages

will include all the tips on how to browse collections, what's in the new

categories, how to become a "Voluntrove", which is our new word for the amazing

Trove community, highlights of research from using Trove, and how to find items

about and created by First Australians. Our new Trove trivia section was inspired by

a question that I received when we were in Queensland, where someone said,

"Wouldn't it be lovely if we had a spot where we could explore or learn a bit

more about what people are finding in Trove?" The Trove trivia, And we will

actually be asking you for suggestions on what will go there. So again, Facebook

and Twitter. Our new collection features are a new way to browse items in Trove.

These are grouped by themes, and they showcase whole collections, shared by

Trove partners. All bring together like information. It's an actually an

in-development feature, and you can access that from the

Explore landing page. Our News will actually group together the latest

events, blogs, and importantly, new items in Trove. This includes the newspaper,

gazettes and journal titles coming soon. The News feed will be in the top right

hand menu of each page and you can always go there to stay up to date. Our

new homepage will also feature a lot of news items, so you can keep up to date

with any new content or new collections coming in to Trove. And finally in the

"new" bucket, collaborative lists. These are a new way to work with friends and

colleagues who also use Trove. You can create a list together to collect a lot

of items along particular themes. Lists will also be able to be filtered, reordered, and have a

drag-and-drop function, and they can also be downloaded. So all of this will be

complemented by the familiar. Let me reassure you that all the content you

know and love in Trove is still there. And of course we add new material every

day. Our newspapers and gazettes look very similar to how they are presented

in current Trove. Search, browse, view download and text correct to your

heart's content. Some colours have changed. The size of the

text has changed. But how it works remains the same. As I said, text

correcting will also work in the same way, with a few colour changes, but there

is new guide information to help more of our community to make the most of this

fun and addictive activity. The way you view online digitized maps, images,

journals and sheet music is functionally the same

as the current version of Trove. Besides these colour changes that I am talking

about, we've also moved the navigation tools to make it easier for you to find

and explore this content. And Trove partners, the wonderful people who share

their collections with everyone from our intro are at the heart of Trove's success,

and we really have worked hard to acknowledge their contribution. They

continue to share these items and their collections with you, and there's

actually a new logo where they can, which you can, which will be used to illustrate

their relationship with Trove, and guidelines on how to, there are

guidelines on how to use this. So without much further ado, I will now pass over to

Cheney for the demonstration.

Cheney: Okay. So hello everybody. I'm just going to

restart the video just to introduce myself. My name is Cheney. I work for the

Trove Outreach team. I've probably met some of you before, if you've come to a

Trove Roadshow or one of our presentations. And I'm going to take you

through a couple of very common journeys, navigating through Trove, and show you

a bit about how to use the Trove preview. Okay. So I'll go back to video, to the

slides now. Okay. And so first thing I'm going to do ... is bring up what you'll see

if you log in to the Trove homepage. So during the preview, as Cathie mentioned,

you'll see this green banner across the top of the page. So ... so what you'll need

to do is just click on the link, and prepare yourself for a view of the

Trove preview. Okay, so the first thing you're going to see when you open the

Trove preview is our new cultural sensitivity message. So this is

customisable. You can find out more before you agree to see further messages,

or you can also turn off the notifications if you don't require them.

We're still doing a lot more work in this area and I'll talk a little bit

more about that later on. So for now I'm going to say "Don't show cultural advice", because

I don't need it during this session. And I'll take you for a little spin around

the homepage. So as you can see, we've prioritised the most popular activity

in Trove, which is Search. You can see we've got a very bright and bold search bar

right up the top here, just under the Trove logo. We have our Trove Spotlight

section, which during the preview will be full of little articles that you can

read to find out more about the Trove preview. So that includes the essential

details - what's new, what's changed and what hasn't, and what we're still working

on. So as mentioned, Trove's still under construction. The Preview won't have

everything working 100%. We've also got some keyholes here which lead to some

common journeys in Trove, such as investigating family history, how to read

and correct newspaper articles, discovering Australian culture or finding some fun

or interesting things. And down the bottom here is our Trove trivia section,

which Cathie's mentioned. We're going to be asking our Trove lovers in the coming

months for their suggestions for trivia items, so I'm looking

forward to seeing all of your suggestions. Something I will show you is

one of our new landing pages. Just before we get started in "Search", I'm going to

show you just the "Explore" landing page. So this is all about browsing Trove, so

taking you through some journeys that are not quite your usual searching, but

discovering things a little bit differently. This page has the link to

the Newspapers and Gazettes browser in it, just on the top left hand side. And

I'll also take you in to show you one of our new collection features. And I'm

going to select the "Women on the land" collection feature first. So we are again

still working on this feature but the first thing you'll see under the banner

are the logos of the organisations that are Trove partners and that have

contributed material to this collection. There's a

bit of an "About" section just telling you what you're looking, which is a wealth

of contemporary resources about women and farming in rural Australia. The

feature that we have available for you to look at at the moment is the "Search"

feature. So you can search within the collection and look at some items. I'll

do a quick search for "farm", and so what this will bring up is just the items

within this collection contain the word "farm". You can see there's lots of

different formats in the collection and you can also narrow down your searches

here on the right hand side. So we'd really love to for you to have a look at

this, and also come back at the launch too, because we'll have a lot more

functionality in the collection features. All right, so to continue on with the

demonstrations, the very first thing I'm going to do is start with the most

popular activity, which is Search. Now I'm going to be doing a search for Nancy

Bird Walton, the early Australian aviator, because I love Nancy Bird Walton. And

you're going to see this same search cropping up in quite a few of the

different demonstrations I'm doing today so I hope you like her as much as I do.

Now what I'm doing first is a basic search. I'm searching across all of the

Categories. Now, "Categories" is what we now call "zones" in Trove. The new name is

"Categories". I will talk a little bit more about this as we go through. So searching

or categories for Nancy Bird Walton. So this is our new search results page. The

search results will first show, if I've done a search across all of the

categories, the top three most relevant results for each category. So as you can

see here, I have three results from "Newspapers", which is the first category

that comes up. Three results from "Magazines and Newsletters". Three from

"Images, Maps and Artifacts", "Research and Reports", "Books and Libraries", "Diaries,

Letters and Archives", "Music, Audio, Video", "People and organisations", "Websites" and

"Lists". Now "Websites" doesn't load automatically in the preview, you do have

to go into the full results to see those. Now because I would like to show you the

newspapers viewer, I scroll back to the top and I might

just pick the second option here.

So as you can see the newspapers viewer doesn't look a whole lot different to

the newspapers viewer that you would be used to seeing. We have changed the

colours, it has a new logo, and we've made the font a little bit bigger and

brighter. But you can still do all of the same functions in the newspaper viewer

that you would be used to doing. So that includes zooming in, zooming out, moving

the article around, reorienting it. And you have all of the same functions here

on the left hand side. You'll see here there's an "Edit text to match article"

button. That gets you into text correcting. Something you'll be very

pleased to know is, all throughout the preview you will be able to try out test,

uh text correcting, so if you log in to your Trove account - I think you can also still

text correct anonymously - but if you'd like to track your text corrections, log in

to your account. Any text that you correct will be saved in your account

and will be available in your normal Trove account, and go through into

current Trove search, so it's synchronized across the two versions of

Trove. So do try it out if you're an avid text corrector, and let us know what you

think. So I'm just going to go quickly through the left hand sidebar, because

all of the functions here are the same as they would normally be in Trove. They

may just look slightly different. So we have the details for the article, so that

includes citation formats. We have the article text, which is where you go to

text correct. We have our tags as you can see someone's already tagged this with

"Nancy Bird Walton". We have our list, so if this had been added to a Trove list

previously, the list name would also appear here. We've got "Notes". Now Notes

is our new name for "Comments", the name is the only thing that's changed. It still

functions exactly the same way and we changed the name to "Notes" just because

it's not so much a comment on the item, as in a personal opinion, but generally

what people put here as information for other readers. So "Notes" we thought was a

bit more of a fitting name for it. We so have "Categories". So Categories are

something you can add to articles when you're logged in. It's a search filter,

which I will show you a little bit later, and you can add additional categories to

this article to make it easier to search. That includes things such as

categorizing it as "Sports" or "Literature". There's quite a few other categories as

well. And here are the common functions: Downloading a copy - several different

formats available; Buying a copy, which opens up the window to "Order a Copy"

through the National Library's Copies Direct service. Printing, and also

toggling this layout, so you can actually close this panel down and just view the

newspapers. So I am going to take you back into search results. And what I'd

like to show you is some other ways of navigating through the search results to

be able to see the full results for each category. So as I've mentioned, you can

click these green buttons here at the end of the top three results to see "All".

You can also tab across the top of the page, so here we have all of the

different categories that you can go into. So "Newspapers and Gazettes". So as

we've probably guessed, this category contains all of the newspapers,

full digitised newspapers, and the Government Gazettes. We find that people

often access both of these two formats at the same time, so to put them in the

same category together made a lot of sense to us. The next category is

"Magazines and Newsletters". This is a part of what used to be called the old

journal zone. So "Magazines and Newsletters" contains full-text, digitised

material that was often published previously in what would you call you

would call a magazine format. So that includes a lot copies of the "Bulletin",

"Pix" magazine, the "Australian women's Mirror", the "Home Quarterly". Lots of

material that Trove users may not know that we actually have are in the

"Magazines and Newsletters" category. Next we have "Images, Maps

and Artifacts." Does what it says on the tin. I think we've made our change in this

name from the old zone. I think it used to be called images, uh "Pictures, Photographs,

Maps and Objects", so we've just narrowed that down a little bit and made it a

little bit more compact. Next we have "Research and Reports". So this contains

academic journal articles, often from peer-reviewed journals, and the more

academic organisation-based newsletters and publications.

You'll find them in "Research and Reports". So again that splitting of what was the

old Journal zone, partly in "Magazines and Newsletters", partly in "Research and

Reports". Next we have "Books and Libraries". So this is where you'll find some of the

items that you would commonly find in your local library. So records of books

and items that you would be able to borrow from a library, as well as journal

databases that you are required to be a library member to open and subscribe to.

"Diaries, Letters and Archives". I don't think that's much of a change from our

previous zone. Again, contains diaries letters and archives, so no surprises there.

"Music, Audio and Video" has had a name change I think used to be called "Sound",

now it's called "Audio". Still contains our oral histories, interviews, lectures and

some recorded music as well. "People and Organisations" is the same name as the

previous "People and Organisations" zone. And "Websites" has had a name change.

Used to be "Archived Websites" and now it's just "Websites". And the very last category

we have is our "Lists" and this is where you will find lists created by our Trove

community or our "Voluntroves" as we now call them. So the next search I'm going

to do is take you back to the homepage and show you the "Advanced Search".

"Advanced Search" has changed a little bit from how it is in Trove now, which is

that we require you to select a category before you go into

the advanced search filters. So I'm going to do a search for Nancy Bird Walton again and

then I'm gonna click on the "Advanced Search" button, which is just under the

green search icon here. And you'll see that when I select it, it's going to

prompt me to select a category. Now I know what I'm looking for. I would like

to show you a magazine article. So I'm going to select the "Magazines and

Newsletters" category. So as you can see, it's carried over my keyword into

Advanced Search, so that's at the top there. I will mention that there is a lot

more work being done to the advanced search zone. The names of the filters may

change. The design may change a little bit. We don't expect it to change too

much, but there's going to be a little bit more guide text with some of the

filters, just so you know what it is that you're searching for and to help you on

your way a little. So I know that I want to search for a magazine article. So I'm

going to look in "Format" and select "Journal and Magazine" article. And I even

know the title of the magazine that I want to search for, which is "Pix"

magazine. I'm going to select that here. Worth noting at this stage that you can

search for multiple titles here. So say you were doing a search in

newspapers, and you knew that there were six or seven titles that you wanted to

search across. You can simply add them into the advanced search "Title" field. So

here, saying I also wanted to search in "The Bulletin", I would select that and you

can see here that I'm searching both across "Pix" and "The Bulletin". And if I

decide I don't want to search in "The Bulletin", I can just cross that out and

it goes away. I also have a year range in mind, so I'm going to enter "1935 to 1940"

for my date range. So there we go, I'm searching for Nancy Bird Walton in a

journal or magazine article in the magazine called "Pix" between 1935 and

1940. And so I must point out at this point that I am in the test system so

there may not be a whole lot of data available for me. It's not quite what

you'll see when you're actually in the Trove preview from February 14th.

But hopefully, something will come up for me. There we go, grand total of one

article. Fortunately, it happens to be exactly the article that I'm looking for.

So I'll click on this and take you into the work record. So you'll see if you've

looked in item records before in Trove, this again is quite a different layout.

We've prioritized the activities that we want people to be doing, just underneath

the thumbnail image here. So if there is a copy available to read online, this

"Read" button will be available. So if I click on the "Read" button it says that

this article has free access. I can view the digitized version at the Trove

digital library. So I'll click on that and just show you the magazine viewer.

Now this is gone back into the current Trove system, so there's not much new to

see there. Good news is that in the actual preview, the magazine's viewer

like the books viewer and for maps and for photographs, the functions have not

changed. So there will be some colour changes and a logo change, but that's really

about all that you'll see that's different there. So I'll take you back

into the preview. And I'm going to do a search for a different kind of item this

time. So I'm going to do a search again for Nancy Bird Walton, because she is my

favourite, and I'm going to take you into the "Books and Libraries" zone, and this is

to show you how you might go about finding a copy of a book that you could

borrow at an actual library. So we've got a few results here. The book that I'm

looking for is the second result. You can see under here there's three editions

available. And I'll go into the record. So the "Read" button is still available here,

and that's because there is a preview available in Google Books of one of

these editions. I think if I click on that, yeah, you'll be able to see there's

the preview for Google Books. Access Conditions Apply, and that's because you

would only be able to get a part of a copy. It would be very unlikely that you would be

able to read the full book. What I'm interested in, though, is the "Borrow"

button, so I want to find out where I can get a copy of this

book at my local library. So this opens up the "Borrow" browser, and you can

narrow this down by state. As you can see there's 75 libraries and organisations

that hold a copy of the book that I'm after. And depending on where the

catalogues are linked to for individual libraries, that will change what I see

when I click on these results. If I click on Auburn Library, it should take us to

WorldCat, their catalogue hosted in WorldCat, and there we go, so you can see

the "Borrow" information for these books, and you can start on your journey of

finding out more information about how you go to your local library and borrow a

copy of this book. I'll pop back into the record now, because I do want to show

you that there's more information available in this record, instead of just,

you know, sort of ready to borrow, and if there's a copy to purchase. So if I

scroll down, you can see there's a summary available. We have all of the

tags. If the item had been added to a list, that would appear here, the same

with "Work notes". But to go and get more information, if you're a librarian and

you're looking for metadata, you would want to click on an actual edition. So

I'll show you here... scroll down you'll be able to the summary,

title, authors and you can also expand this out to view more information. So

there's still all the same information in these work records that you would be

used to seeing. You may just have to scroll a little bit further to see it.

Unlike the actions reading, borrowing, buying or citing, which are now right up

the top, right underneath where the thumbnail image is. So, and that prioritises some of

the most popular actions for those items. So I will pop back to our lovely homepage

again. And the next thing I'm going to show you is a bit about Trove

accounts. So they've had quite a few changes. So I'm going to log in. I'm just

going to log into my own account, which involves typing in a password, in front of

the big audience of people, so bear with me. Hopefully I'll get this

right first time. Okay, fingers crossed. There we go. It looks like we're in. Okay, so

you can see now that I'm logged in, my name is in the top right hand corner now.

So going to the drop-down list, and I will show you my profile. So this is

quite different to what you would be used to seeing in Trove. We've done a lot

of work since to clear this up and make it a bit cleaner and clearer, and

also give you some extra control over your profiles. So as you can see here, you

can edit your details. I've already popped a little biography

there for myself. But say if you were a researcher, you could add your ORCID

number in here, you can add your website, you can add a Twitter account and a

Facebook account, and you can also change the privacy settings for this

information. Now we're doing a lot more work in this area, so I won't talk too

much about that. Suffice to say that you can log in and have a look around. I'll

take you into the next tab which is "Text Corrections". Now you've always been able

to see some of your previous text corrections in Trove. Now you'll be able

to see all of your text corrections. So you can see that I've completed 327

lines. It's important for me to note now that anything that you've done in your

old Trove account will carry over to your new Trove account. So all of my text

corrections are here, all of my tags, all of my notes and all of my previous lists.

So for people who've got quite a lot of activity in their Trove account now,

don't worry, those things will come with you into the new Trove, and you'll even

be able to see them during the preview when you log in. So you can look at all

your text corruptions. You can do a search to just look for the text

corrections you've done in the last hour, day or week. This is handy if you're not

sure whether you've logged in to start text correcting, and if you want to check

you can jump into your account and go, "I wonder if those text corrections I did

in the last hour have shown up?" So if they're there, you'll be able to see them

and you'll know you were logged in when you started. So all of your tags are here. The tag

cloud format has changed a little bit. You've just got a nice bright list of

tags that are easy to see. Though if you hover over them, you'll be

able to see how many items you've tagged with those particular words. And you're

also able to sort them as well. Notes are the same. You can see all of the notes

that you've added and you can also search through them. I've only put one note

in here so you can't see that there's too many to sort down and I'll take you

into lists because this is the area that's changed the most and will have

the most changes for you to explore in the preview. So you can see here these

are all of the lists that I've created, some are public and some are private. And you

can only see them because you're looking at my logged in account here, but I have

a few public lists in there, and I've also created a collaborative list. And I

will show you how to do this. If you'd like to change a current public list

that you have into a collaborative list. So I'm clicking on one of my public

lists and I go up to the top right-hand side here, and click on "Manage this

list". And then I go into "Edit list details". And see here there's a little

slider bar and I can change it to turn it on to blue and have it be a

collaborative list. So this means that people can now request to follow my list,

and also request to join and collaborate. So you can't send invitations out to

people. They can only request to join. We made this decision due to the way that

the privacy settings work, this meant that it was the safest way to have the

lists available to collaborate. So all that people need to know is the name of

your list, and they can look it up in Trove while they're logged in and

request to collaborate with you. So I'll take you

back a step and I'll also show you a few other features that you can do with your

lists. So this includes a new feature which is you can now download the lists

that you've created. So you can download those in a few different formats. You can

filter your lists as well. And if you go into managing your list again, you can

also reorder the items in your list. So this is quite exciting for those of you

who have quite long lists and want to change where something appears in it. So

all you do is hover over the multi-directional arrow here and pull

the item up to where you want it to go. Just give it a chance to load. See now

those two your swapped positions, so you can do that in the "Manage this list" menu.

So I'll just pop back into my Profile. And now I think one of my colleagues

previously had requested to join one of my lists, so I'll take you into my

activity feed...There we go, "grunkle", who is my colleague Tighearnan, had

offered to collaborate with me on the list "Dogs of Trove", so I think I can

approve that request, or I can deny the request if I don't know this person

who's requesting to join, or I can block them if there's someone that I don't

want to be able to see and join my list. I'll take you really quickly through the

process of requesting to join lists as well, because I know this is something

that you all might want to do during the preview. So what I've prepared earlier is

a list I know that one of my colleagues has that is collaborative.

It's called "Figureheads". I'm gonna drop down the "Category search" and search for

"Lists", because I know the format that I want. And hopefully it will appear here up the top. Here we go.

So "Figureheads", a collaborative list by T. Kelly. So if I pop into that list and I

am logged in, I'll be able to see two buttons here. One is "Follow", if I just

want to keep up to date with this list.

So whenever new items are added or if things change with the list, that will

appear in my profile's activity feed. I'll be able to see what's happening. And I

can also request to join. So if I click this button that means that my colleague

now has a request for me to join their list "Figurehead", and it's gone to them

for review, because they're the list owner. You might be wondering, since

collaborative lists are a new feature, what happens to them after the preview?

So like I mentioned earlier, your tags, your text corrections and your comments

will all be saved and synchronised across your two Trove accounts. Because

collaborative lists are a new feature this will work a little bit differently.

So if you create a collaborative list during the 10 days of the preview, that

list will be saved in Trove, and after the 10 days it will just go back to

being a regular public list with you as the owner, and you'll have access to it

again as a collaborative list when we launch in June. So it won't go away, it

gets saved, it continues to be a public list that you can work on. It just

doesn't have the collaborative feature enabled again until June. So if this is

something that you're keen on, really use the time in the preview to, to get in and

make some collaborative lifts and figure out how it works, and you know, sort of

get ready for June. So the last thing I'm going to show you how to do in Trove

today is to head back to current Trove. So you've had a good explore around, you

think you might come back, but for now you just want to go back to

your regular programming. So all you do is click the text in the yellow banner,

and this takes you back into regular Trove. And as you can see, the banner is

still available here back in current Trove, so you can click and toggle between the

two as often as you like during the 14th to the 24th of February. So I'm just

going to take you back into the presentation now.

And tell you a little bit about more, some of the things that you can do in

the preview. So you might be wondering where you start, so I have a few

suggestions for activities that you might like to try. As Cathie mentioned

earlier, all the content that's available in Trove will also be available during the

preview, so you'll be able to search, browse and view items as you normally

would. So try out the basic search, try out advanced search and explore the

differences. As I've also mentioned. there is a lot of new content on our homepages

and our landing pages. Have a look at them all, and have a think about what

you'd like to see there, because we're going to be asking you about that in the

coming months. So asking for suggestions for content, asking you the things you

want to learn about Trove, and trying to do our best to meet those needs. As I've

shown, you can text correct, you can add tags and you can add notes, so do take

advantage of that feature. And you can log into your new-look Trove account and

check out that new design. Maybe try making a collaborative list. So I saw

quite a few of you on chat earlier who seemed pretty keen about the

collaborative list, so I'm really pleased to see that. It is a really nice

feature and we're all quite excited about it. So here's a little bit of advice about

the things we're still working on. As we've mentioned, Trove is still very much under

construction, and we've got an article on the Trove preview homepage which is

called "Under construction" and it goes into a little bit more detail about this,

but here is a short list. Advanced search, there's going to be a few changes to the

layout, the names of filters, and some added guide text. We've still got a lot

of help information to write about all our new features and changes. We've made

quite a good start on this but you can probably appreciate there's a lot for us

to cover. Many of the pages you will see in the "Help" section will say "Under

construction" on them, and that's how you know they're not quite finished yet. As I

said earlier, our cultural sensitivity warnings are also going to have more

design done on secondary warnings, and there's going to be a form you can fill

out to let us know about other items that you think are

culturally sensitive and may need some warnings. We also have an icon that's

been designed for us that we're adding to highlight the collections and items

by and about First Australians, so that will help you unearth some of those really

great collections and items that we have. We've had a lot of feedback on our page

that shows information about Trove Partners that's just under the logo on

the homepage. If you click on this page you'll see

it's still under construction and we're quite busy redesigning it, so not quite

finished there yet either. The item records that I took you through when we were in

"Books and libraries" and "Magazines and newsletters" are going to be made more

compact and easy to scroll. I don't know if you saw during my demonstration but

the headings are currently still quite large and we've had feedback that it's

hard for people to scroll down to get that detailed information on the page

more quickly, so there's still changes to come there too. The collection feature,

so the one that I took you through earlier, "Women on the Land",

we've got a lot of other collection features coming and they're going to

have some really nice new discovery options added to them as well. And of

course our Trove accounts will be more fully functional, including more

information about how your privacy settings will work. So what do you do if

you need help during the Trove preview? So if you come across something that doesn't

work as you expect, and it's not covered by the under construction features that

I just mentioned, do let us know. So there are a few pages in the preview, including

help, contact and the article in the, on the homepage called "Under construction",

that will link to a help request form that you can fill out and it goes to us via

email.So this is the best way to get in touch with us to request assistance. It

goes directly to team members in Trove. If you post something on our Facebook

or our Twitter pages, we may see it, but it's going to be a lot harder for us to

keep track of your inquiry. So we really do encourage you, if you've got questions,

if you're stuck, if something's not working for you, do click in the link

there. So it's trove.nla.gov.au/help. That page will

only be working during the preview. If you try and enter that link now, you'll

get a "Page not found error". But if you click on it during the preview, it will

take you into some guide material and that form that I mentioned that you

can fill out. And of course questions about your research should as always

still go to Ask a Librarian. So use the Trove Preview Help request form just for

questions about the Trove preview. So if they're about your research, we'll

direct them off to our very, very competent librarians, because we're not

all librarians in Trove and we can't all answer your questions. So next I'm going

to hand back to Cathie for an explanation of a much asked question, which is

"Why are we changing Trove?"

[silence]

Cathie: Thanks Cheney and I hope you all enjoyed that demonstration in the test site.

So you've seen some of the changes we are making to Trove, but you might not have

expected it to change quite so much. So here's going to be the answer to the

question on the screen. [slide: Why are we changing Trove?] Surely there's a good reason - right?

All of the changes we've made to Trove were based on research, and here is a summary of what

people told us. This includes people who use Trove regularly and people who have

never used it. From people who had never used Trove and were looking at Trove

for the first time: "I've never heard of it. Is it modern? Will it have updated

information?" "How can I trust what I find here?" "Is this information fact-based?"

"It seems that anyone can add information to this site". And this assumption was

because of the way that we used to describe text correction. A disappointing

question for me, I have to say, and one that slightly broke my heart, "Why would I

use this when I have Google?" And also, "The layout, when looking at it on my phone,

wasn't great. It looks a little clunky." "My question is: Trove, what is your purpose? I

still don't get what you're trying to do." And also, "I wonder what Trove can offer

me?" So those, that was, those were the problems people who had never used Trove

were having. And from people who use Trove regularly we heard, "I taught myself

to use it and I'm obviously missing out on access to many sections of Trove." "I

don't like Trove that much. It takes too long to figure out how to

find what I'm after." "It takes a while to figure Trove out. It's not always clear

what the next steps should be." So on average during our research we learned

that people were taking up to 10 hours and sometimes longer to learn how to use

Trove, and that's probably a little bit too long in the current digital age. As a

reminder our focus has been to take the very best functions of Trove and make

them easier to use. We've not changed the functionality of

the newspapers or gazette viewers, just made the buttons more visible. Our goal is to

continue to connect communities to our National, State and local collections and

hopefully our work across the whole of Trove will make this collaboration, and

your research, more visible. But what's next after the preview, before we go to

the Q and A? Well, the team will be getting back to work

straight after the preview in getting Trove ready for launch. So there's still

work to go, but we really want you to have the opportunity to learn more about

the changes and what's going to be new, by sharing slides, videos and more

information. So please follow Trove Facebook and Trove Twitter to do that.

We'll be putting calls out to Trove Partners, but also to some of the

community to ask them to contribute content to Trove for the launch. The

official launch of Trove will be planed, is being planned, for late June 2020. And as

I said, please follow us to stay up to date. And now I'd like to commence the

Q and A session. Renee: thanks so much Kathy and Cheney. We've had

lots of activity on our question board. The first question we have comes from

Jessica. She'd like to know: "Will our existing lists in our accounts on Trove

be carried over to the new Trove?" Cheney: Yes. So, I did cover this very briefly in my

demonstration, but any activity that you've done in

your current Trove account will carry over to your new account. So that

includes any lists that you have now, any tags, comments and text corrections. I'm

not sure if you could see, but I was logged in to my regular account that I text

correct and make lists in, and you were able to see all of my current

contributions there. So there should be no difference between your old and new

account. Renee: Great, thanks Cheney. And Marilyn asks a

question that many people have asked, "Will our old login details work?" Cheney: Yes.

Again, show you here. So, your login details won't have to change, so you know, if

there are any changes required down the track, we will get in touch with you. But

for logging in to Trove, especially during the preview, just use your current

username and your current password. Renee: Good. Thank you. Fiona asks, "When the

preview becomes live, will we be able to get more results from our searches than

it's currently shown in this webinar?" Cathie: Absolutely. You will be able to get more results. We are showing you

the test site today because we're still working on the production version of

Trove, and that has absolutely everything that is in current Trove, because we want

you to have that same experience. So the answer is yes, more content. Renee: Oh lovely!

Thank you, Cathie. Rebecca noticed that, a mention, to the

Trove newsletter, and she asks, "Has there always been a Trove newsletter?" Cathie: Oh that

was very, I was looking at people in the comments and seeing how quickly you were

spotting things like the download button for lists, and someone eagle-eyed has

spotted the Trove newsletter. There isn't a Trove newsletter at the moment, but

there will be from late June 2020. This is one of our ways of keeping you

updated and informed about Trove activities and events from all of our

partners and ourselves. Renee: Thanks Cathie. Claudia asks, "Will the upgrade include

the ability to more easily find digitised articles that need text

correction?" Cheney: Okay, so currently there's searches that you can do in Trove to

look for items that haven't yet had any corrections, or perhaps

titles that are in need of some text correction. So this search won't change

in new Trove. So that means that the ways that you would find them now are still

the ways that you'll be finding them in new Trove. We were finding on our

Facebook that the Trove homework we were giving people of titles that you might

like to start correcting was very popular, and we're going to continue with

that, so we'll keep highlighting content that needs correction, so people who are

looking around and, you know, having a bit of difficulty finding material to

correct, can more easily get in and start doing that. Renee: Oh, excellent. Thanks Cheney.

Anonymous asks, "Will new Trove be compatible with IE,

that's Internet Explorer, as well as Chrome?" Cheney: Yes. So for those of you who

participated in the invitation only closed beta that we had late last year,

you will have noticed that there were some differences in performance and

appearance in between using Internet Explorer browser and Chrome browser.

So those differences have largely been ironed out now. You should be able to use

Internet Explorer without any problems. That said, we are still under

construction and some of the areas that we're working in include things like

mobile responsiveness and browser compatibility. If you do notice any

really major differences, please get in touch with us in that help request form

and let us know. But it should be largely the same experience. So feel free to use

either browser. Renee: Great, thanks Cheney. And finally Christine asks, "Can I

please have a copy of the list of suggestions of what to try in the

preview?" Cathie: Christine, of course you can, and even more importantly, when you

visit the Trove preview on that first day, I strongly encourage you to read all

the, the four articles that are going to be on the homepage. I know you want

to plunge in and search straight away, but actually, hidden in there are all

the hints and tips and tricks and suggestions of what to do. So yes, we can

share, and we will share via this webinar as well. Thank you. Renee: Yes, certainly

I can add that list to the email that everyone receives tomorrow and can also

put it at the bottom of the YouTube video, which will be available tomorrow.

Cheney: I might also add as well that that list of things to try is going to be something

that I'll be sharing on our social media as well, during the preview, so keep your

eyes peeled, follow us on Facebook and Twitter, and I'll be linking to those as

well, just to keep you guided. Renee: Great thanks Cathie and Cheney. Some great

questions there today, and we'll start to wrap up the webinar for now. Just a few

more important notes before we go. As Cheney said, if you're using Trove during

the preview and something doesn't appear to be working as it should, please visit

the Trove preview Help page. The URL is on the screen at the moment.

But for other research help please contact our Ask a Librarian service. Our contact

details are on our Ask a Librarian web page or just Google "NLA Ask a Librarian".

And if after this you need any further research inspiration, we record all of

our learning sessions. If you're interested in one of our past topics,

these are all ready for you to watch right now on the Library's YouTube

channel. And finally thanks so much for joining us today it's been wonderful to

see the really positive response in all of your comments.

A final note on our next exciting webinar. Please join us next week on the

14th of February for the "National Library for Librarians". And in two weeks'

time we're presenting a live, encore showing of this session, so if you know

someone who wanted to register for today's session but missed out, they have

another chance to visit us, to join us, on the 19th of February. Well, that's all

from us today. Thanks again so much for attending today.

And until next time, happy researching.

National Library for Librarians 2020

This video does not have a transcript.

Good afternoon or good morning everyone, depending where you are in Australia.

Thank you Renee. That was a lovely introduction. My name is Cathie Oats and

I'm here with my colleague Cheney Brew, who'll be giving a live demonstration shortly.

I'd now also like to begin by acknowledging the Ngunnawal and Ngambri

people, who are the traditional custodians of the land on which this

webinar is being held, and pay respect to their elders both past and present. I pay

my respects to the Elders of other communities in Australia and extend this

respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in attendance

today. As an Australian I value the opportunity to acknowledge Country as a

simple act of Reconciliation. I trust that the acknowledgement and respect it

invokes resonates with many here today. And I'll now just switch off the camera and

begin the presentation. I'll just commence again. We welcome to the webinar about

the Trove Preview. This is an opportunity for the public to use the

upgraded Trove before we launch in late June. The site is still under

construction, but we wanted to give you plenty of notice as to what's coming

before June. This Preview allows you to explore what's changed, what has remained

the same and how to start getting comfortable with the 2020 version of

Trove. After the Preview closes we will have screenshots available, written guides

and this recorded webinar, and we will continue to share those up until launch.

These are going to be publicised on the Trove Facebook and Twitter pages, so

please follow us to stay up to date. One of the reasons we're doing the Preview

is we recognise the change is difficult, and we hope these attempts help you get

there. So a little bit more about the Preview. So the Preview opened on Friday

February the 14th, and it's going to run for only

another five days, until Monday, February the 24th. February the 14th was Library

Lovers Day and the theme was "Uncover Something New". We thought that this was

particularly fitting to show off some of the new aspects of Trove. I should let

you know that building this updated version of Trove has been a highly

collaborative exercise and over 3,000 members of the public have participated

in activities to inform the new site. They've answered surveys, participated in

testing and attended focus groups. This was to get you involved and our thanks

go to all of those who took the time and the effort to get involved. This Preview

as I said though is only open for a short period and it will close on

February the 24th. And then it'll be back to work for the team as they work hard

to get everything ready before the late June launch. So many of you have probably

already seen the site - the banner on the Homepage, the current Homepage, which

takes you to the Trove Preview. This banner is also available on the

Newspaper Browse page and the search results page. When you click on the link

will open the new Preview in the current window and I strongly encourage you to

tell your friends, your family, your colleagues, anyone who know, to click on

that green banner and take a look at the new Trove. And what they're going to

see when they do that is this...

This link takes you to this spot, but we also know that some people want to go

back to the current Trove, and so if you look at the yellow banner it also provides

you a link to get back to Trove current. If you want to switch between the two

sets of pages, we recommend you doing this by having two browser windows open at the

same time. As I said, anyone can access a Preview. It's available to anyone who

visits Trove. So have a look around, enjoy it and let us know what you think.

But let me tell you a little bit more about what's new. When you're exploring

Trove you will actually see some new features that the Trove community has

been requesting for a long time. Let me tell you a little bit more about them.

There are new content on the landing pages, these new landing pages, which are

provided to help you make the most of your Trove visits. These landing pages

are: First Australians, Explore, Categories, Community and Research. These pages

include tips on more ways to browse collections, what's in the new categories,

how to become a Voluntrove, our new word for the amazing Trove community,

highlights of research that use Trove, and how to find items about and created

by First Australians. You'll also see a Cultural Sensitivity notification. The

visibility of these notifications can be adjusted to suit

you. I should flag this, these notifications

are still under construction and they are part of a series of coming changes

aimed at making Trove a more culturally safe for all of Australians.

A new feature on the Homepage, Trove Trivia, shines a spotlight on the weird

and wonderful items in Trove, and I'll flag we will actually be asking for you

to contribute Trove trivia to us soon. Another new feature is a collection

feature. These are a new way to browse items in Trove. There can be grouped by

themes or showcasing whole collections shared by Trove partners. This still in

development feature can be accessed from the Explore landing page. Our News area

groups together the latest events, blogs and new items in Trove.

This will include newspapers, gazettes and journal titles coming soon. You can

access this newsfeed in the top right hand menu of each page to stay up to

date. When the upgraded Trove is launched in late June, the homepage will

show a lot of news items, so you can keep up to date with any new content or new

collections coming into Trove. And finally, Collaborative Lists. These are a

new way to work with friends and colleagues who also use Trove. Create a

list together to collect items along particular themes and these lists can

also now be filtered, reordered with drag-and-drop functions and downloaded,

and Cheney will be demonstrating these soon. But let me tell you a little bit

more about what's familiar. Let me reassure you that all the content you

know and love in Trove is still there, and there's always new material being

added every day. Newspapers and digitized gazettes

still look very similar to how they do in current Trove.

Search, browse, view, download and text correct to your heart's content.

Some colours have changed, but how it works

remains the same. Text correcting also works in the same

way with a few colour changes. We've also added new guide information to help you

make more of this fun and addictive activity. The way you view online,

digitised maps, images, journals and sheet music is functionally the same as

current Trove. This is in, but we have made those colour changes which are

common to each page. This will help you become, learn to use Trove more

seamlessly. We've also moved some navigation tools to make it easier for

you to find and explore this content. And recognising that partners are the heart

of Trove's success, our hundreds of Trove partner organisations from all over

Australia continue to share their items and collections with our community. There

is a new Trove partner's logo, which can be used to illustrate their relationship

with Trove and guidelines on how to use this logo. I'd now like to hand over to

Cheney for that demonstration that you've all been waiting. Cheney: So I'm just gonna

start the video again briefly to introduce myself. Hello my name is Cheney.

I work with the Trove outreach team. And if you've been part of the Trove

community for a while, you may have seen me give a presentation or at a

conference booth or posting on social media or answering a help question. The

Trove team is teeny tiny right now, so we all wear it quite a few hats. But today I

will be taking you through a few popular journeys in Trove and giving you a few

demonstrations of the new upgraded version, compared to the current Trove. So

I'll just stop the video again, just so you can see exactly what's on the screen.

And the first thing I'm going to do is take you into the Trove that you

probably see every day. Now some of you have already been into the Preview, so

you may have already on this green banner. If you haven't, it's

available in, on the homepage. It's also available in the newspapers browser

screen and it's also available at the top of search results. So clicking in

this banner takes you into new Trove, so we're going to do that now and have a

bit of a look. So the first thing you'll see when you get to a new Trove is the

cultural sensitivity messaging. So this is customisable and you can find out

more before you agree to see further messages, or you can turn off

notifications if you don't require them. They're session-based,

so if you want to get that information back, if you've turned off cultural

advice and you want to see it again, you'll have to open a new browser window.

Now we're still doing some more work in this area and I will talk about what's

coming a little bit later. So for this session I'm going to say "Don't show

cultural advice", and I'll show you the homepage. So the first thing you'll see

on the homepage is our big search bar. We know that people love searching in

Trove, and it's their number one activity, so we've made it very hard to miss. But

I'll take you down to our Spotlight section where we're currently featuring

a number of articles about the Trove Preview. So this includes the key facts,

what's still under construction, what's the same and what's changed and what's

new. So these aren't just pretty pictures from our collection, they've actually got

some really useful information in there. They are quite short, too, so if you're

browsing around the Preview, pop into these articles and have a bit of a read

and feel free to share them around, too, with other people who may be using the

Preview. I'm now just going to show you a little bit more what's in our homepage.

So we have some key holes here which have common journeys and popular

journeys into Trove. We're still working on the content here so maybe have a

browse or think about what you'd like or expect to see here. We have a Join the

Trove Community section, which will have links to our upcoming newsletter, and our

Trove Trivia section. We keep getting asked every time we talk to our

community what they would love to see and we always get the answer of mystery

objects or highlighting weird and wonderful collections. So that's what our

Trove Trivia section is about, and we'll be asking our community to provide

ideas for what to put in this section in future. So get thinking. I'm going to take

you through now some of our landing pages. As you can see they're across the

top here, underneath the Trove logo. So we have Explore, Categories, Community,

Research and First Australians. I'm going to show you the Community page. And this

is because in the top left hand side there's something that is a very popular

feature of current Trove, which is our Hall of Fame. So if you're a text corrector,

your text corrector ranking will be in this list, along with all our other top

text correctors. So if I click on this, so this opens up the Text Correction Hall

of Fame, and it should be noted as well that if you are logged in at this point,

it will show your rank in this list as well. So I think I'm, I'm in there

somewhere, but hovering fairly far down the bottom compared to our, our top 10. So

that's how you can access the Hall of Fame. So we no longer have it in our, on

the, on the front of the homepage, so, and there's also some more information about

text correcting now available in your Trove account, and I'll take you through that a

little bit later as well. So I'm going to start with our most popular activity,

which is search and I'm going to be doing searches for Nancy Bird Walton the

Australian aviator. This is going to be a bit of a theme during my demonstrations

because I happen to like her a lot. But the first thing I want to show you is

the easiest way to get into our most popular category, Newspapers, So I've got

my search term in the search box, "Nancy Bird Walton", and I'm going to use

this menu here that says "All categories". And I'm going to choose Newspapers and

Gazettes. and so when I click this green search button, this takes me straight into

the Newspapers and Gazettes full results. So this is a similar search to a

lot of what something, a lot of you will be doing already, going through the

newspapers zone, so instead of going to the homepage and then

the newspaper zone, you'll be going to the homepage and then selecting

Newspapers from the All Categories. So once you're in here you'll see some

additional filters on the right-hand side. These are the same filters that

you'll see in current Trove, but at the moment they're on the left hand. We've

just moved them to the right hand. So these filters are useful if you want to,

say, look at just newspapers and not gazettes, so you can select that there and it will

filter it. Say you only want to look in newspaper titles from a particular state.

I can select there, and now I'm only looking at Queensland titles. And you can

also select from a date range, so I can say 1940 to 1949. So like I said, these

are all the filters that will be available right now to use in current

Trove, they're just on the other side of the screen and they look a little bit

different. So I will also show you how we cover Advanced Search, and how to do more

targeted searches for a group of titles in my next demonstration. But because we

are just doing a basic search, I will show you how to do just that. So I want

to show you how to search across all of the categories. So, say we're not just

looking for a newspaper, we may want to see what other formats the Library and

all our partner organisations have material on, that are about Nancy Bird

Walton. So I keep this as "All categories", and I hit the green search button. So

these are our All results. You'll notice that Newspapers and Gazettes still

appears at the top. This is our most popular category and we also wanted to

prioritise access to full-text digitised resources. So you can type across the top

here to see full results in each category, otherwise what you get if you

scroll down is the top three most relevant results in each of the

categories. So I've gone through Newspapers and Gazettes.

I'm now in Magazines and Newsletters, and at any point, if I want to see the full

results as well as tabbing across the top I can also

select the green buttons here and that takes me again into the full results for

each category. So scrolling down, it'll go through all the categories if you scroll

far enough. But if you don't want to scroll, you can just use the tabs across

the top. I'm now going to take you into the Newspapers viewer, because I want to

show you what that looks like in the Preview. So I'll just choose the second

newspaper item, and that will bring up our viewer. So it has all of the same

functionality as the current and newspapers viewer, but as you can see

there are some changes to colour, to branding and to font size. And also in

the text correction pane the buttons there are a little bit brighter and more

obvious to get you into text correcting just that little bit faster. But all of

the buttons here that control the zooming in, the zooming out, and how to

orient the viewer, they're all the same as they currently are. And all of the

buttons on the left-hand side are also the same as well, so the citation details,

there's the full article text where you can get in and start text correcting.

There's tags, so if they were tags on this article they would appear here. Same

with lists, this already appears in a list about Nancy Bird Walton, it might be

my list. Categories. So this currently has the category of Article. Additional

categories can be added if you're logged in just to make it easier to filter the

searches. And then we have all the normal buttons that you're probably familiar

with. How to download a copy, how to buy a copy, which is ordering a more

high-resolution copy through the National Library's Copies Direct service

and printing. So as you can see all the same functions. We haven't changed

anything that's there at the moment. So I will take you back now just a couple of

steps, back into that search results page...

and talk a little bit more about some of the categories that we have. Some of them

will be familiar to you from the current zones in Trove and some of them will be a

little bit different. So Newspapers and Gazettes combines the current digitised

newspapers zone, along with our government gazettes.

We found that people were looking at these categories at the same time. It

made sense to keep them together.

Magazines and Newsletters contains full-text digitised journals that were often

originally published in what people would see as magazine on newsletter

format. So this is the category where you would find things like The Bulletin,

Pix Magazine the Wireless Weekly, Pacific Islander Monthly, quite a few

of the really really great full-text and also full-colour

digitised journals, so they're in Magazines and Newsletters now. Images,

Maps and Artifacts has all of the same things as the previous zone, which I

think is Pictures, Photographs and Objects. We changed the word "Objects" to

"Artifacts", but this is where you'll find your photographs your posters and your

images and also any physical object records that we hold.

Research and Reports tends to contain the more academically focused research, uh

resources, so if you need to access a peer-reviewed journal article that's

online available, it will be in Research and Reports, as well as some journals

where you have to be a subscriber or library member to login.

Books and Libraries contains all of the records that you would expect to find in

your library and you can also find out where they're held in libraries around

Australia, as well as copies of books that are available for loan. Diaries, Letters

and Archives I don't think has changed since the zone title in current Trove.

So again that contains our collections where people have written letters, kept

diaries, all kinds of really excellent things are

in there, as well as full collections from notable Australians.

And "Music, Audio and Video" also hasn't changed. I think we changed the word

"Sound" to "Audio", but otherwise all of the same results in there as well. People and

Organisations is also the same and contains biographical information on

people and organisations. And Websites is what we call the previous Archived

Websites zone, so a preview of that in an All category search isn't available, you

have to go into the full results to see it, just because that section of Trove is

so big. And our very last category is Lists and this is where you will find

lists of public information created by the Trove community. So if you create a

list and you make a public, it will be available to be searched here. So the

next search I'm going to do is an advanced search and I will again take

you back to the homepage for this search.

So I'm going to use our term Nancy Bird Walton again, and you'll notice that the

advanced search now appears here just underneath the main search bar, but when

you click on it, it'll actually ask you to select a category. This is because

doing an Advanced Search across all of the formats has never been a very

meaningful search in Trove, so the best way to do a true advanced search is to

actually select a category first. I'm going to go into Magazines and

Newsletters, just because this is one of our new categories and you may not have

seen what's in here before. So it's carried over our keyword into

advanced search. And I would like to say, this section is still very much under

construction, so the names of the filters and the design is still being changed, as

well as adding some guide text, just to make it a bit more user-friendly and

makes it very clear what you're searching at a particular time. So, into

my filters, I know that I'm looking for a magazine article. So I want to select

that from Format, so I go and choose "Journal or magazine article". Now I know

the title of the magazine that I'm looking for and this is where you would

add actual titles to search within. So I'm looking for Pix magazine. So typing

Pix I can see it in the list and I hit "Enter". Now I can search for multiple

titles here if I know their names, or I can just browse the drop-down list and

select as many as I like. So if I wanted to add The Bulletin to my search, I could

do that here. Say I wanted to add Pacific Islander Monthly, I could put that in as

well, and then I can add as many as I like and if I decide later I want to

take them out, I can just hit the "X" here and that takes them out. I do only

want to search Pix magazine at this time, but this is where you would do your

searching for multiple titles and you can add as many as you like. I'm going to put

in a date range, because I think I'm searching for articles between 1930 and

1940. So there we are, so I've got a search for Nancy Bird Walton, for a journal or

magazine article, the title must be Pix, and it must be between 1930 and

1940. Now that's a fairly narrow search so I wouldn't be expecting too many

results with that. We'll see what we get when we hit the green search icon. Yes! As

I expected, we only have one result, but luckily, it is the exact result that I

wanted, so I will take you in and show you the new record for this magazine

article. And you will notice here that it says "At Trove Digital Library."

That's a little notification, just so you know that this article is available to

read online right now in Trove, and I'll show you how to do that so here is the

record which gives you some information about the article and

what's in it. And there are two options here, and we've moved these up under the

thumbnail, so that if there's a copy to read online, this "Read" button will appear.

If there is no copy to read online and you have to borrow, it it will instead have

a "borrow" button and clicking it will show a list of libraries. I will take you

through that demonstration, though, so that you can see. So I'm clicking "Read" here.

It's telling me I've got free access and I can view it at Trove Digital Library.

And this is a link, so if I click that, it should take me into the journals and

magazines viewer. Now if you've looked at our journals zone in current Trove, you

will probably have seen this reader before, and it does look very similar in the

Preview of Trove. The main difference is that the buttons, the navigation, so

zooming in and out and having a two page layout or a full page layout,

they've just moved from the bottom of the screen up to the top. So if I wanted

to make a full page layout, I would just do that. I can click it again to exit out.

I can read it a bit more like a book and flip through the pages. Take it back to

one page view, and all of the buttons on the left-hand side, again they may look a

little bit different but they give all of the same information that they give

now. So details of the article, copyright and citation information, as well

as printing and downloading and also ordering copies. So they are all the same

functions that you would have now. So the next thing I'm going to do, just

following up on the items that you can only borrow, is do a search for an item

which is not available to read right now in Trove. So doing my favorite search

"Nancy Bird Walton", say I'm looking for a book, I'll go into Categories and I will

select the Books and Libraries category, so that will get me all of the book

records held by libraries around Australia. And that is the quickest way

to get into that category. So this opens up the full

list of books, again on the right-hand side, I can filter to change the results

that I see, but I can see the book that I want here.

So I'll take you into the work record. Now this still has the "Read" button

available, and that's because there is a small summary of the book available for

free to read on Google Preview. But as you can see it's just a preview, and not

the full text of the book, and what I'm actually after here is a copy that I can

look at. The full book. So I'll click on "Borrow" and this brings up a list of the

libraries that have told us that they hold a copy of the book. So it's quite a

long list, I can narrow it down by state here if I want to. If I just want the New

South Wales results, I can click there and it brings them up. Now it'll depend a

lot on how a library does its catalogue online. If it's connected to WorldCat,

clicking on this link will take you straight into the library catalogue for

that library. For example, if I click on Auburn Library here, it opens up the

catalogue there, and I can see the copies of the book that this library holds, and

get some more information about the library, and see if it's near me, and if I

can go in and borrow a physical copy.

I can also scroll down here to get more information about this book, including a

summary, the tags that are in, it if it's been added to any Trove lists, and more

information on individual editions. If I go to the individual editions, there's

also a lot more data available that I can get by scrolling down. So that

includes the sorts of things that librarians would hope to see, perhaps for

copy cataloguing, so copyright information, content types and you can expand that

out and get a lot more information. It just depends on how much you need. For

most people who are finding that they were just after whether they could read

a copy online, or borrow a copy from a library, and that's why we've put that

information right up under the thumbnail image. So the next journey that I'm going

to show you is actually through your Trove account and this involves logging

into my Trove account, and the very scary task of

entering my password correctly, while lots of people are watching me...

All right, fingers crossed...

All right, that's quite good. So I've done it right the first time and you can see

up in the right-hand side that I'm actually logged in now. So I want to go

in and look at my Trove account and show you how it's changed. Something

that's important to note, and it's quite a popular question that we've been

getting during the Preview, is whether you can log into your current account,

and you can, so you don't need to create a new username or a new password, you can

just use your current Trove account to log in, and it will also have all of your

old contributions from current Trove. So if you're a text corrector, if you tag items, if

you put notes on items, if you make a list, these will all be in your account.

And you'll see this when we go into My Account, because you'll be able to see

all the things I've done. So as you can see, it's very different to the current

Trove accounts. The first thing you can do is there's an option here to write a

little bit about yourself, and if I go into Edit you can see the sorts of

things that I can put in here. Now, I can choose to make this information public

or keep it private. The default setting is Private. You can see this little

orange eye with the slash through it means that it's private and no one else

can see it. But if I wanted, I could add my website, my Twitter, my Facebook, and I

could make this public if I wanted other users to be able to find me. So, I'll take

you through some of the other features in the Trove accounts.

A very popular one is Text Corrections. So as you can see I've corrected 333

lines, which is a very nice, pleasing number to me, but I'm only ranked 18,000

out of the nearly 60,000 Trove text characters, so I've got a little work to

do. Something that's changed from current Trove is that you can see all of the

text corrections that you have ever done in this list. You can filter the list to

"Limit", and so you can sort by the the corrections that you've done at a

particular time. Something that a few people have noticed that is missing

from the new version of Trove is the ability to see publicly what part of an

article that you have edited, with your username against it. Now we've actually

taken this feature out of the new Trove and that is just to minimize some issues

that we were having with some users using that feature to harass each other.

Very unfortunate. It is very much a minority of our Trove users though, but

we've made it easier to track your own edits in your Trove account, and you do

this by hitting the "Compare" button underneath your corrections. So if I had

corrected this article and I chose to stop halfway through, go and make a cup

of tea, go and do something else, and come back to it later, and I couldn't remember

where I was up to, I would log into the my Trove account, go to the article and

hit the Compare button. So it tells me what I deleted out of the article, what I

added in the article, and so I know that I've only done a paragraph of this

article. If I had done more, there would be a lot more in this column, and so it

reminds me, I think, I can look at that and think, "Okay, I've done that paragraph

now," so I can jump back in and keep going. And if I click on this link,

it takes me back into that article. So as you can see, there's still a lot of text

there to read, and I've only done the very bottom section of that text correction.

So I can jump back in to the top and see what I can decipher in the rest of that

article, which is very hard to read. I'm gonna take you back in, though, to my user

profile and show you around a little bit more, so I'm not quite done yet. So I've

shown you text corrections. In Tags you've got all the tags that you've

added as well, so from previous Trove as well as in the new Trove. And if you

hover over them, you can see how many items you've added those tags to, and you

can also sort them with the aid of the filters above here. Notes are what we

call our old comments in Trove. They're just called Notes now, but they function

exactly the same way. And we have our Lists, so these are the lists that you've

made, including your private in your public ones, so you can see all my lists

because I'm logged in and I'm showing you my login screen. But you can manage

these as well, and you can do quite a few different things with the lists and I'll,

I'll show you that. So you now have the option to download your lists, if you'd

like a physical copy of them, and you wanted to make notes on them, or have

them available offline while you're not in Trove. You can do that now. If

you go into "Manage the list" you can also drag and drop to reorder. So say I

wanted to change the order of this item, all I have to do is hover over it, pull

it up to where I want, let go and just give it a second to think there, and then

that's reordered my list items. So this can be quite handy if you've added

something recently to a list, but you want to bring it up to the top and

access it more readily. So just, again, hover over and drag it in the list where

you want to find it. We've talked a little bit about

collaborative lists as well, and I'll show you how to make a list a

collaborative list. So once you're in your list go to the screen button here, "Edit

list details", and this helps you decide what kind of list you want to make. So

right now my list is public, but if I wanted to make it private, I could click

here and it just gives me a lttle warning that if anyone else contributes to

this list and I make it private, they won't be able to see them anymore. But what I

actually want us to make this list collaborative. So I've just switch that, and

that means that other people will be able to discover my list and that they

will also be able to request to add items to my list and to join them. So

we've chosen to do it this way, that people request to join your list rather

than you inviting them, just because it works the best for our privacy settings.

You might be interested to know what happens to your collaborative lists if

you make any in the next few days, because as I'm sure you're all aware, the

Preview ends at the end of Monday the 24th of February. And so the

collaborative lists won't be available in current Trove, but they will be saved as

a public list. So they'll be saved and the collaborative feature will be

available for you again at our launch in June. This isn't quite the same situation

for your text corrections, your tags and your notes. So any text corrections tags

or notes that you add during the Preview will be synced across both of your

accounts, so they will continue to be available because they're available now

in current Trove. It's just those collaborative lists that won't be

available for a few months because they're a brand new feature. So I've

given you, I think, a fairly comprehensive tour of what's in our new Trove. Final

step that you might be interested to know is, once you're in the new Trove, and

you want to get back to browsing current Trove, how do you do that? And the answer

is you click in the yellow banner, and the yellow banner will be across most

pages in the Preview. So you just click on this text here that says "Head back to

current Trove", and that takes you back to current Trove. And you can switch in and

out as many times as you like. Time is running out, though, to access the Preview,

so if you want to get in and start trying out some of these features that

I've demonstrated, you've only got until 5:00 p.m. Australian Eastern Daylight

Time on Monday to do that. So jump in, get looking around and encourage

everybody you know to do the same. Now I'm just going to take you back in

to our PowerPoint, and give you a little bit of a To-do List, because you might be

wondering where to start when you first open the Preview, so I have a few

suggestions for activities you would like to try. As Cathie mentioned, all of

the content that is available in Trove will be available during the Preview, so

you'll be able to search, browse and view items as you normally would. So I would

advise you to try out different basic and advanced searches. You know, keeping

in mind we are still under construction. They may not be all working quite as you

would expect, but do give them a go and give us some feedback. There's also a lot

of new content on our Home and our landing pages. I only showed you one of

the landing pages, so you might like to explore all the different ones, take a

look at what's there, and think about what you would like to see there. And

this is because we're going to be asking you about the content that you

would want to have on these pages in the coming months, so we can get it ready for

you for launch. As I've said, you can text correct, you can add tags and you can add

notes, so go in and try those out. And also log in to your new-look Trove

account and look around the design. Maybe try making a collaborative list, and

uh, telling your friends and they can request to follow it and also request to

join... So I talked about all of the things you can do and it is worth mentioning

some of the elements that aren't finished yet. So there are actually quite

a few more than you might think, despite how shiny and new Trove Preview looks, it

is still very much a site under construction. So here's a short list.

There's also a longer list of items under construction on the new Trove

homepage. There's an article there called Trove Preview: Under construction,

and that goes into much more detail. So, what we're still working on. I've already

mentioned advanced search, and this is going to have a few changes to the

layout, the names of the filters and some guide text for easier decision making.

We've also still got a lot of help information that we have yet to write

about all of the new features and changes in Trove. We've made a pretty

good start on this, but you can probably appreciate, there's a lot

to cover. Many pages that you come across in Help will still say Under

Construction on them, and you're likely to come across them if you do much

exploring in the menus and do the Help. The cultural sensitivity warnings are

going to have more designs done on secondary and further warnings. There's

also going to be a form that you can fill out to let us know about items that

may be culturally sensitive as well, so we're still working on those. We're also

going to have an icon that we're thinking about adding to highlight

collections and items that are by and about First Australians. So our work

there's not just about culturally sensitive material, it's also about

highlighting some of the really great First Australians material that we have

in Trove. Now we've had a lot of feedback on our page and that shows information

about Trove partners through our Partners page. If you click on this page

in Trove, you'll see that it's still very much under construction and we're busy

redesigning that. Our item records, as well, are going to be more compact and

easy to scroll. So I don't know if you noticed when I was showing you, but some

of the headings are currently a little bit large and it's harder for people to

get information that's more detailed. They've got to scroll down the page. So

we're looking at decreasing some of the font sizes and also the limiting the

amount of white space on the page, just to make it a bit easier for people to

get around. The collection features which is a new article type that we have in

Trove is going to have some nice new discovery options added to it, such as

image galleries, and we will be talking about and promoting those collection

features as well as they get more of them. And of course our Trove accounts

are going to be fully functional, so that includes a lot more information about

how your privacy settings will work in future. Now you might be wondering after

I've showed you all of this, how you can find help. So if during the Preview you

come across something that doesn't work as you expect, and it's not covered by

those Under Construction functions that I just mentioned, and they're not

covered in that guide article on the homepage, do let us know about it. So there

are pages in the Preview in Help, in Contact us and in that article on the

homepage called Under Construction that will link to a help request form that

you can fill out and send to us. The link that I'm showing on the screen right now,

trove.nla.gov.au/help will work if you're currently in the Preview

site. So this is the best way to get in touch with us, directly to request

assistance. It goes to team members in Trove, and I am one of them. So if you post

something on our Facebook and Twitter pages it's actually going to be a lot

harder for us to keep track of your inquiry. I know that what we've shown you

today is really quite different from normal Trove. And there's a lot of

changes. You're going to want to discuss it on Facebook and on Twitter with your

communities. But just keep in mind that it's actually quite difficult for us to

responds at any length to those social media comments, and also it's difficult

for us to record them, so we can evaluate them and pass them on to the people who

make changes in Trove. So please, if you've got comments and feedback for us,

do direct them to that help request form. As always, if you're actually just

wanting to ask a question about your research or needing a bit of help with

that, the best way to do that is still through Ask a Librarian. So that's all

from me. I'm now going to hand back to Cathie for an explanation of a very

popular question in Trove, which is "Why are we changing things?" Cathie: So this is a very

popular question at the moment, "Why are we changing Trove? Surely there's a good

reason, right?" Now that you've seen the demonstration and had a chance to have a

look at the Preview, you might not have expected to see so many changes. But let

me give you an explanation as to why. Trove is actually growing at an

exponential rate. More and more content is coming into the site every year.

There's actually now more than six billion, yes billion, items. We have to

find a way for you, our wonderful Trove community and researchers, to see the

depth and breadth of all those treasures in Trove. For example, from our statistics

and analytics, we could tell that people were not accessing some of the new

content in the website area, in the Archived Websites area, and that is a

wealth of information going back to the 1990s, which may have our information for

not only academic researchers, but family historians as well, and something that we

wanted to make a little bit more obvious to you. And it's the same story for those

magazines and newsletters as well. We know there is content for everyone and

we wanted to share it with you in a more easily and visible way. Our aspiration

has always been to continue Trove's transformative impacts on research

over the next decade to keep it free, to further enhance and expand Trove, that it,

can so that it continues to connect communities to their local and national

collections and harness new opportunities. We know this digital

change in this digital environment is changing at a rapid rate and that can be

challenging, but we hope that this preview is one way that you can have a

chance to have a look and get used to the changes before they are launched in

June, and this will become Trove. This will be the site. So I would like to

reiterate that all the changes we've made were based on research. And here's

a summary of what people told us. These quotes come from people who use Trove

regularly and people who have never used it, and I'll read the ones from people

who had never used Trove or who were looking at Trove for the very first time.

"Never heard of it. Is it modern? Will it have updated information?" "How can

I trust what I find here? Is this information fact-based?" "It seems that

anyone can add information to this site." "Why would I use this when I have Google?"

"The layout, when looking at it on my phone, wasn't great." "It looks a little

clunky." "My question is, Trove, what is your

purpose? I still don't get what you're trying to do." And finally, "I wonder what

Trove can offer me?" And from people who use Trove regularly we heard many, many

stories of people taking more than ten hours to learn how to use Trove. For

example, "I taught myself to use it and I'm obviously missing out on access to

many sections of Trove." Or, "I don't like Trove that much. It takes much too long

to figure out how to find what I'm after." And, "It takes a while to figure Trove out.

It's not always clear what the next steps should be. We've worked hard to

make sure people can see that Trove contains collections from all over

Australia. We've created a more consistent and holistic user experience

across Trove and this will help you learn and understand how to use it.

We've also highlighted that the people who use Trove are an incredibly valued

community, and we want to be able to effectively communicate with you in a

more visible fashion. We want to let you know about what's available in Trove,

who contributed the content, and how it can enhance your research. Our focus has

been to take the very best functions of Trove and make

them easier to use. We have not changed the functionality of any of the viewers,

we've just made things more accessible and more visible. Our goal is to continue

to connect communities to our national, state and local collections and

hopefully our work across the whole of Trove makes this collaborate,

collaboration, and your research, visible and easier. So what's next for Trove

after this Preview? Well it's back to work on after their Preview closes on

the 24th. But we will be sharing slides, videos and more information on the

changes in the lead up to June. So there will be lots of help and assistance to help you adjust to

new Trove. We're also going to be working with Trove partners, to ask them to contribute content, to share

images, blogs, stories and more information about their collections with us, as the official launch is planned

for late June 2020. So as I said earlier, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. And now we have a Q&A session...

Renee: Thanks so much, Cathie and Cheney. Yes, we do have a few questions that have come it. Let's share

some with you. So, first Maureen asks, "Is it possible to edit my lists and tags so

they are better though out than those I set up years ago?" Cheney: Yes. So there is. I might

actually log in and show you on screen for this one and do a little bit of a

demonstration. So I might have to log in, I'll see, on no, I'm still logged in, that's

good. So if I go into my Profile, and I go into my Lists, so you can definitely edit

the names of your lists. So you'll be able to see all of them under here. If you

go into "Manage this list", and then, "Edit list details", you can see there

that you can definitely change the names of your lists to anything you see fit.

Tags are actually a little bit trickier. So you can see all of the tags that

you've added in your profile, and if you click on the items you can see what

you've tagged and go through. But what you'll actually have to do is, you'll

have to create a new tag with the correct,

you know, wording that you want on it, and then you'll have to go back in and add

that to the items that you've already added your previous tag to, and you can

delete the old one. So you will be able to delete your old tags but it's a

little bit more of a granular process than just simply renaming your lists. So

lists are easy to rename. Tags are a little bit trickier, but you still can do

it. Renee: Thank You, Cheney, I think that's touching on Robyn's question which is

the next one: "Would you be able to merge tags? So if you've made an error in naming a

tag, do you do you still need to look at your tag list and delete the typo and

retag the correct tag?" Cheney: Yes so the answer to that one is the is the latter. So you

will need to look at the tags you've already added and then delete out the

ones with the errors that you don't want. So we don't have a way for users to

currently roll back large swathes of tags. I mean I wouldn't put it out of

reach for a future Trove, but at the moment, not available.

Renee: Thanks again, Cheney. Okay. And finally Carmel asks, "Will there be a

Question and Answer page once Trove is fully functioning?" Cathie: Thanks for the

question, Carmel. The Question and Answer page will be in multiple areas, so one of

the things I'd encourage you to do is actually go and have a look at the

Categories landing page that we have. This Categories page will be heavily

used for to helping people learn how to use Trove. For example, the article I'm

showing you here tells you all about those different categories. So the

information on how to use Trove, how to search and do those activities, will be

on Trove. In relation to research inquiries, we would encourage

you to continue to use the Ask a Librarian service to get help with

those research queries. But for options on how to improve your searches and

finding out more about Trove, these help pages will be available to you.

Cheney: I also wanted to note that I am going to be running a bit of a community

consultation about the content that you'll see on the pages in new Trove. So

I'll be running some polls, asking people in different ways about what sort of

things they find challenging in Trove, particularly in transitioning to the new

Trove. And I'll be creating some content that will go on those pages that will

help people with that, and give them, you know, the best head start for when we

launch in June. Renee: Right, great, thank you so much. Let's just go back into our presentation

now. Well, just to reiterate advice on research help. So as Cheney and Cathie

have both mentioned, if you're using Trove during the Preview, and you have

only five days left, and there's something that doesn't appear to be

working quite as it should, please visit the Trove Preview help page and the URL

is on the screen now.And just to repeat, if you have any other questions about

your research or accessing our collection our Ask a Librarian service

is always ready to help. Our contact details are available on our Ask a

Librarian webpage, or you can just Google "NLA Ask a Librarian". And finally,

thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks Cheney, thanks Cathie. Please join us

for our next webinar on the 25th of March. It's our new format, 30 minute mini-

webinar that you can fit into a lunchtime. And it's about the ways that

Australians have always found to create their vision of home on a small scale,

whether by necessity or by design. Well that's all from us today. Thanks again

for joining us, and until next time, happy researching!

All right, good afternoon everyone. My name is Ella and I work in Reader

Services here at the National Library of Australia. As Ruby mentioned, today I'm

going to go through our enhanced eResources portal with you and I'm going

to be doing this specifically through a research lens. Just turn the camera off...

All right, so my background is in Art Historical research, so it might be the

research romantic in me but I'm very excited to be able to channel my love of study and discovery

into today's session with a few art historical references scattered in

amongst it all. That being said, my hope is that this webinar will be of use to

researchers of all kinds. Not only scholarly independent researchers, but

also those who enjoy learning about their hobbies, passions and interests at

home, and also those who want to use our eResources portal more generally. To give

you an idea of today's session before I start, I plan to use an example research

question as a kind of case study to navigate our eReources portal, giving

you research tips along the way and demonstrating the great value of this

service, which puts a wealth of digital resources at your fingertips. First, a

general introduction to eResources at the Library, and our new improved

eResources portal, which was launched earlier this month on the 2nd of

September. And here's the home page in front of you now. We've worked hard to

design this new portal, which combines previous functionality with new features

that enhance discoverability and make searching easier, more flexible and more

efficient. So if you're one of those few users who indicated they had used that

previous portal you'll notice some of the same features mixed in with some new

and improved ones and I'll go through them all today. Indeed, perhaps the most

exciting new feature of our portal is that you can now easily conduct

full-text searches of many of the e-journals, ebooks and more in our

collection here at the library. This feature is especially great in a

research context, as it means you were drawing from a more very pool of

resources, and this variety can really enrich in

your bibliography and you're learning at large. Now someone who learns best with

visuals, I've put together this very high-tech diagram using a picture from

our collection to demonstrate how I like to think of your resources at the library.

You, the researcher are the diver, quivering with anticipation, planning to

dive into a large and possibly intimidating pool of resources and

content. And eResources is the diving board you can use to guide you smoothly

into this pool. So without further ado, let's dive in. All right, so in terms of

accessing the portal, for those of you who have previously used the library's

eResources, getting to this new portal is much the same. So we've gone to the

NLA's, the Library's, homepage "nla.gov.au". We can scroll down and click this big

eResource box here to take us to the portal. Another great

new feature linking our physical holdings to our digital ones is the

ability to switch from searching for material in the catalog to doing the

same search in eResources. So I'll go through that now so if you were to go

into our catalog again through the nlas homepage, clicking this green catalog

button here, and you were to conduct a search, and click "Find", you're interested in

birds for example, you can then go to this in

"eResources" link, this new link off the top of the page and click that to be taken

to our eResources portal and it will automatically conduct that same search...

So back to the library's home page for those of you who indicated that they

didn't have a library card yet it's very easy to sign up. Simply visit our home

page and click the "Get a Library Card". If you scroll down a little bit it's the

second option on the right here. If you cannot get to the library to pick up

your card, we do offer a complimentary mailing service and we'll send your card

out to you about your residential address to begin your research at home.

All right. So now the moment you've all been waiting for, we'll enter the portal

by clicking this Big eResources box just here. Now one of the new features of

our portal is that you only need to accept the terms and conditions as you

enter the site rather than each individual database, as it was previously.

So this means you can move between databases without that interruption.

So I'll click on this green accept button here to enter the portal and here we are.

So to log in from home, click the link at the upper center of the eResources

page, this one up here in this yellow or golden banner. You'll be redirected to

our catalog to enter your details but will then be taken back to eResources

upon logging in. To log in you just need your user ID, the long number located on

the back of your library card, and your surname. When using our eResources on site,

like I am today, there is no need to log in as you'll automatically be given

access to everything the portal has to offer by clicking the link. So I'm going

to go ahead now and click this link in the upper center in the yellow banner to

log in.

And now, because I am on site here at the Library using one of the Library's

computer, you can see in the upper right corner here it's saying, "Welcome your

location is the National Library of Australia". All right, so now let's talk

through some of the features of the new eResources homepage. You'll notice some

new links in the top banner like the home page over here to the left of the

page. Our eResources page now links directly to our catalogue through this

link and vice-versa so you can jump back and forth easily

between the two. We've also included a link to our "Research Guides" here, and so

you can easily refer to them for research assistance. I constantly refer

to our Research Guides, so I'd really recommend that you have a look. And we've

also got a link to our previous eResources portal, called the eResources

legacy portal. It's important to note that this legacy page will only be

accessible until the 1st of November, so I really encourage you to get familiar

with the new portal as it stands. All right, so now we'll move down to this

larger search box in the center of our page here. If you know what specific

database you are wanting to use, you can use the "Databases A - Z" function and

this function will be something familiar for those of you who have used the old

portal. Click into that now by clicking on that text, and here you can see

they're listed alphabetically, so you can search that way, and it's you're also

able to refine by access level within this feature. So you can see over to the

left here there are three categories outlined for our eResources. Those that are

freely available to anyone over the Internet, the symbol is this little globe.

We've also got "Licensed Resources", which you can access from home with your

Library Card with the set of keys. And we've also got "Onsite Resources" for

which you need to be in the library building, the little NLA building there.

For the purposes of today's session, we will be focusing on freely

accessible and licensed resources, both of which you can use at home to conduct

your research. Looking back at the top of this box again we've also got a

"Publications A - Z" function, so if you have a specific journal or

publication you're wanting to search in, you can do so that way. And we've also

got the help tab here. I'll be coming back to this later, but just a quick look

at the help tab, so I'll go back to search here by clicking the search

button. So as with our previous portal from this

home page you also have the option to conduct an "Advanced search" by clicking

this link here. I'll click on it now so you can see what it looks like. It'll be

quite familiar to you so while you can do this advanced search I much prefer to

do a basic keyword, just keyword search, and then use limiters to refine my results.

So I'll go back. Yeah I find that this method gives me a wealth of relevant

material to work with and takes my reading to places I wouldn't have been

able to identify at the very beginning. Just kind of one of the joys of research

and it's my hope that today's case study will demonstrate this. So speaking of

today's case study, head back into the PowerPoint. Let's get into it, so I can

show you how to use the eResources portal for your research in five easy

steps. Here's the research question I've come up with for today's session.

"Identify and discuss key themes in the work of the 20th century

Australian modernist artist Margaret Preston". All right, so step one. Break down

your topic and identify key words. So to begin it's always a good idea to break

down your question and identify the key words you'll start undertaking your

research with. In looking at this example question, three obvious starting points

come to mind.

Themes, Margaret Preston and Australian modernism. And this is what you can get your

highlighters out and identify those keywords within that initial question. So

it's from here that you can start searching these terms in the

eResources portal to see what you come up with. But here's a bit of keyword search

advice. Keep updating your keywords as you go through your research. Your

research question is only a starting point, as once you begin reading material

you'll find other terms that will be fruitful to search as well. Remember you

can also experiment with combinations of keywords. I must confess as an art

historian this isn't the first time I've looked into Margaret, for Margaret

Preston. So to demonstrate just how the keywords you search might morph and

change over time, here's a sneak peek into how my own search has changed when

researching this artist using eResources. So first off we have Margaret,

Margaret Preston, my first search, and this is sort of a basic beginning using

one of our initial key words identified at the very start of my research. I then

searched "Margaret Preston modernism", combining keywords here to get more

specific results. "Margaret Preston printmaking", combining keywords again,

this time with a new keyword that came up during my research thus far. "Margaret

Preston still-life". Here I am combining keywords again, this time with another

new keyword that came up during my research.

"Margaret Preston Thea Proctor". Again I'm combining keywords here this time

using the name of one of Preston's contemporaries that I found to be

referred to throughout material on Preston. And finally, "Australian

printmaking", a completely new keyword. So different to

that initial list I had, to find information to contextualize the

research I've undertaken so far and to generate new ideas. So you can see the

real variety and change over time with my keyword searching, and although I said

finally, before I said Australian printmaking, I think these keyword

searches could just continue to grow as you're studying. So hopefully this gives

you some idea as to how you can get the most out of the portal, in not just

sticking with your original keywords. They're very useful to get you started,

but can be changed or modified over time to yield more results. And this is one of

the aspects I find most exciting about research, but once you start you soon

find yourself building an intricate web of content and ideas that is just so

infinite and plentiful and exciting. So now we'll move on to actually searching

these keywords in eResources. So step two, use keywords to perform searches in

the portal. So we'll move back to the portal there. So as I mentioned one of

the most exciting features of our new eResources portal is that you can now

conduct full-text searches of many of our databases. So upon searching one of

your initial keywords like "Margaret Preston", you'll get results from across

in many different databases. So I'll type in "Margaret Preston" now. We'll see

there's also an autofill option here. I'll click on this big green search

button to start my search. So again this full text search capability is so great,

because it means you can easily have access to really varied material with

just the one search. So here on the first page of search results we already have

material from a periodical. You can see over here, identified by that text as

well as material from academic journals, identified to the left of these item

records. So at this stage approximately 80% of our online content is full-text

searchable. Hence the variety of results here and

we're working to improve this even more. It's worth noting that to make sure you

can still easily access some of our popular databases which aren't full-text

searchable, we've added direct links to them that will always appear on your

search results page so here, you can see these links down the right-hand side of

the search results page here and no matter what search you do these links

will always remain here on the right. And there's also "Quick Links" to get into

that "Databases A - Z" function and "Publications A to Z" function as well.

All right, so now I'll just quickly open up one of the results to show you how easy

it is to access this material. Let's see, I'm going to choose this second result

here as I can see that the full-text version of this article is available to

me. I know this because it states "Full Text" here on the record, which is

important to take note of, because our portal does also return results for just

citations as well as full text content. And as you can see this text identifying

material as full text comes in a variety of formats depending on what database it

was found through, so you'll see this first one is available in full text, and

it just says "PDF Full Text", whereas this one available through JSTOR says "JSTOR

Full Text", but they mean the same thing. All right, I'm going to open this content

now by clicking on the title here, this link, which will take us through to the

individual item record. I can see all of its details here and I'm getting back to

navigating these individual records a bit later in today's session but just

immediately to access this content quickly I head over to the left of the

page here where you can see this JSTOR full-text and a link just here so I'm

going to click on this link it's going to open up in a new window so it's taken

me through JSTOR through to the JSTOR record and I can

click this "Download PDF" button here so I'm going to click on that now. Accept

these terms and conditions" here, and here we are with our academic journal article

ready for the reading. Let's go through and show you so this is that full text

article. Okay great. So now heading back to our search results...let's move on

to the next step. Step three. Refine your search results. So after

conducting a keyword search you can refine your results using the limiters

to the left of the page. So I'll show you where they are now. You can see this

"Refine Results" bar here if you scroll down there really are a lot of options

available to you to refine those results to best assist your research. Looking for

academic papers? Refine your results to academic journals under "Format", which

will mean you have a more academic pool of resources which is always useful to

maintain the scholarly integrity of your research by using verified content.

Only want to see Australian content? Refine by "Geography" under this tab here.

You can also refine by date range, subject, language and more, and it's

really worth experimenting with these limiters too to see what different

results are suggested. If you are limiting by subject, please note that not

all of our content has been assigned a subject heading quite yet. So getting

back to our research question today, given my research topic, I might like to

see what limiting to the format of academic journals has to offer. So I'll

scroll back up here on the left and check this "Academic Journals" box. My

search will be updated and then I might also add "News" under format, so that I can

see not only valuable academic journal articles, but also equally

valuable newspaper articles, which enrichen your research as primary sources of

information. So I'll check that box here. For more information about primary

sources at the Library, you might like to take a look at our recent blog post

written by our librarian Lisa, titled "From the horse's mouth", which you can

find through the Library's homepage. Getting back to my search results here, it

might also be relevant to see what specifically Australian sources have

written about Preston, given that she's an Australian artist, so I can limit to

"Australia" under this "Geography" tab that I showed you earlier on the left. So I'll

check that box that says "Australia". Okay. It's worth remembering that you can

change what limiters you've applied to your search as you go. So here, having

clicked, "Geography", I can see that I've refined my results to a point where they

just aren't as useful. I'm only returning 14 results, and I can tell that by

looking at the search results one to 10 of 14 up here. And I can see in just having

a quick look through these results here that there's really varying degrees of

relevance. All right, so to get back to more useful results, I can head over to

this current search box on the left of the page here, and I can just uncheck

"Australia" or not uncheck, but cross off Australia here by clicking this "Remove"

button.

So now looking at my search results, I've

got 921 results. If I scroll down, I can see

these results are looking initially a lot more relevant to those previous ones.

So these would be the limiters I would decide to use I think for conducting

this research on Margaret Preston today. And again, if you're ever confused as to

what limiters you have applied, you don't want to scroll through the list you can

go to this current search box and see exactly what keyword you've searched and

what limiters you've applied to this search to get these kinds of results. So

another type of material I'm sure many researchers would like to know how to

find, and general users as well, is ebooks. If I go back and remove my current

limiters, so I'll head over here and click the little cross next to "Academic

Journals" and "News", I can then refine my search by going to the "Format" feature,

clicking "Show more", and then just selecting "ebooks", and clicking this big

green "Update" button. And here we go. A relevant and scholarly publication

published in 2015 to help with my research. And I'll open this up now by

clicking the link the title, entering the item record, I can see cataloging details

here. Heading over to the left of this item record page over here and clicking

the "PDF Full Text" link...

now we have our ebook opening. And there you have it. I now have access to the entirety of this

ebook. You can see over here you can navigate this ebook via its contents or

you can just scroll through to the relevant pages. Not gonna wait for those

individual pages to load though. I'm gonna head back to my results now and

start thinking about the next step. Step four. Organize your content. Just click

back, and back. Now I'm going to uncheck "ebooks" here. And I thought we have good

results under "Academic Journals" as a limiter and "News", so I'm just gonna apply

those limiters again to go back to that those search results that we liked. So

now that I have this refined search I can now start identifying material that

is of interest to me in undertaking my Preston study rather than going into

each record and looking at each individual piece of content as I go, I'm

going to create a small group of saved content before knuckling down to start

reading. To create this smaller curated group of resources, I can click on the

little folder icon to the right of the item record. So I opened this one

previously as an example. I liked the look of it. I want to add it to this little

group, so I had it over here and I click this little manila folder with a "plus" on

it. And just see that's now changed to a full folder. I can see that this second

result is full text, so I click on the folder over here I'm going to read it as

well, and I might save the third one too.

All right, to see all of these saved items together in my personalized list, I

can click on the "Folder View" link up here on the right. And here it is. My very

select group of resources. Now I've done this using the onsite version of

eResources, which logs you in as a general Library user. This means that upon

leaving this Library computer at the end of today's session,

these saved groups will be lost. This doesn't matter so much if you're

planning to do all your research and reading in one go. But if you're anything

like me, it can be fruitful to conduct research and reading over several days

to let the ideas you're learning about really settle in your mind. Luckily, there

is an option to create a specific profile for yourself that will remember

your saved groups and keep them safe for returning to another day. So the profile

that you will need to create to do this is separate to your Library card login.

In fact, it's a profile with EBSCO, the provider with whom we collaborated to

create this enhanced portal. In creating this EBSCO profile, you'll be able to not

only access your saved groups within the Library, across various sessions, but also

remotely, so you can research at home. To create this EBSCO login, simply click on

the sign in to "My EBSCOhost" link which I'll show you here at the top of

the page, and create your profile. I'll now sign in using my profile

details and show you what it looks like.

So I just clicked on that link. It's remembering my details and I'll click

the "Sign in" button here. And so if you haven't got that EBSCO account yet,

you would go down to the bottom of this page and this text says "Don't have an

account? Create one now", and you click that link and enter your details. And

this EBSCO account is free, so I'm just going to click the "Sign in" button here.

So we're now logged in to my profile and this is the part where you can get a bit

creative with how you organize your content. If you're just beginning your

research, you could group all of your chosen material under one more generally

titled titles folder, in this case perhaps Margaret Preston. If you are further

into your research and have started to notice common threads during your

reading, you might like to break them down into those instead. Alternatively, if

you are super organized and are starting your research with an essay structure

already in mind, you could sort your content by paragraph

number. And you can see down here you can add custom folders and that's when you

can give them those custom names and those custom groupings. So being able to

so flexibly save content is a really great feature because it means you can

tailor how you organize your research in a way that best suits the way you think.

And if you'd like further help with this EBSCO folder management, you can click on

the small question mark bubble to learn more. 'll show you where that is. It's

this button at the top of the page and if you hover over that and click it,

it'll take you to EBSCO's really thorough outline and guide as to how you

best manage your custom folders. So I'd recommend you take a look at that.

All right I'll exit out of that now. and I'll go back, all the way back, to my

search results again. And on to step five. Navigate individual records. So now we've

talked about organizing content on a broader level, the collection of content,

let's take a look at how to manage individual pieces of content through

each item record. So again, I do really like this article up here. I'm gonna go

into the item record by clicking on the title. And here we have some

cataloging details and some tools and functions, and I'm going to show you some

of these features now. So over to the right of this item record page we have

the "Tools" bar. The first feature I want to show you, or the first tool I want to

show you, is this "Permalink" option. And permalinks are very important as they

are a guaranteed method of finding your way back to a particular record or page

on the Internet. These are also the links that you should

be using in your bibliography, if you're generating one, as they will provide

access to your future readers. So by clicking this "Permalink" link here, you

can see that I've got this generated permalink that will always just be

associated with this item record. So I can copy and paste that into my

bibliography. To get out of this permalink tool we'll just click this

cross button here.

Move on to another tool, the "Cite" tool. So our eResources portal will generate a variety

of citation styles for you, depending on what you're after. So I'll click on this

link on the right of the page again here, and here we go, the portal has

automatically generated a variety of bibliographic entries. So we've got the

APA, Chicago, Harvard and MLA.

So very useful to use this "Cite" tool when keeping track of all your

references. I'll exit out of this site tool now, by pressing that cross button

again. Alright, just briefly in this Tools bar there's also the option to save the

item record details to your computer, which can also be very useful. And if in

looking at this record you decide you don't actually want it in your folder

anymore, because you'll remember that I saved this one to my folder previously,

there is this "Remove from folder" option here. So there's just one more aspect of

using the portal that I'd like to touch on before wrapping up today, and

that is what you can do to access scholarly material that is not available

online. For example if I was looking for an article in an issue of In print

Journal, published by the Print Council of Australia, I might see in eResources

that the result for this material is just a citation rather than full text

content. in this instance we strongly suggest you also try a search in the

Catalogue for this material, as there are other ways you might be able to get your

hands on this content digitally without visiting the Library. So I'm gonna head

using this "Catalogue" link at the top here, back to the NLA Catalogue page, and I'm

going to search for Imprint here, typing "Imprint" in the keyword search bar here

and clicking "Find".

Right. If I scroll down, I can see the Library does indeed have imprint in its collection,

yes, physical issues published by the Print Council of Australia and I can

then check to see what issues of Imprint are held by entering the Catalogue

record, by clicking the link, the title.

Here we have the catalogue record, and I'll scroll all the way down to the bottom of

the record, and look at the details next to Items or Issues held. Upon seeing the

issue I am after is indeed in the collection,

I can then, subject to any copyright restrictions, place an order for a copy

of the article using the Library's Copies Direct service. I do this by

clicking the "Order a copy" tab, which is up here. So I'll click that now, clicking "Add

to Cart", and following the prompts specifying the details of the article

I'm after. For any questions about our Copies Direct service, please see the

Library's website. Now, heading back to our PowerPoint now. Alright, so as we come

to the end of our session today I hope that by going through these steps with

you, you've been given an idea of how our eResources portal can greatly assist

with your scholarly research. I hope that by using the Margaret Preston research

question as a kind of case study I've shown you how to best navigate and

utilize the portal to find, gather and access a wide variety of content and

material to shape your research and writing. And just to repeat those five

steps that I followed, they were, one, break down your topic and identify

keywords. Two, use keywords to search eResources. Three, refine your results.

Four, organise your content. And five, navigate individual records. Finally, we

know that becoming familiar with our enhanced eResources portal will be a

change, so we've put together a number of help guides and an introductory video to

assist you with navigating this new and improved service. You can find all of

these on the eResources homepage via the "Help" tab, and of course if you ever

need any further assistance, you can always use our Ask a Librarian service.

Thank you for listening and happy researching everyone. Ruby: Great thank you so

much Ella. We've got quite a few questions that have been asked, so we'll

cover those, and if you do have any questions for Ella before the end of the

session, please send them through and we'll work through them. All right, so we've

got um one of the first questions that got asked by Peter and um, Tara also.

Uh, Leanne also asked it. Is is it worth putting in your search results in

quotation marks? For example, putting Margaret Preston in quotation marks?

Ella: I mean you could definitely try that. My instinct is always to go as broad as

possible to begin with, because you just don't know what results you might

accidentally be eliminating by being too specific at the beginning. That's why

rather than recommending you start with an advanced search I recommend starting

with that general keyword search. So I would start without those quotation

marks. Ruby: Yes because using the quotation marks you're searching for those two

words together as a phrase and so if you wanted to narrow it down it could be

useful for a person's name but other general keywords, like Ella said, I think it

is really advisable to to start general if you're getting too many results

that's probably when it's a good idea to look at the quotation marks. Great, so

Loretta asked the question. She's still unsure if all of this that you've

demonstrated today, can be done from home or do we have to be at the Library?

Ella: No the wonderful thing about today's session is everything I've shown you can

be done from home, so you can conduct that research

home. As I mentioned the Library has three categories of eResources, free,

licensed and onsite. And to be honest, the onsite

resources which you can only access in the Library's building, they're not the

bulk of our collection. So the bulk of our collection for eResources is those

freely recent freely available resources and those ones that you can access with

your library card at home. So as long as you've registered with the Library and

you have that Library card with your user ID, you'll be able to do all of this

from home. Ruby: That's it, it should be exactly the same as Ella demonstrated. And

I suppose just touching on onsite resources, Janet noticed that that

Ancestry link came up on the side, so are you able to access Ancestry through the

NLA. Ella: So Ancestry is one of our onsite resources, so you do need to be in the

Library building, due to licensing restrictions, but again if you go to that

"Databases A to Z" feature and you filter by category, by access category, you can

see what is available to you at home and what you will have to come into the

library to use. Ruby: And I should point out with some of those big family history

databases like Ancestry, a lot of public libraries around Australia do provide

access to that so it's worth checking with your local public library to see if

they provide access to that database, as it's very popular. All right our next question is from Jennifer and

she actually has an EBSCO account with another institution so does she need a

separate login to access a separate EBSCO login for our eResources? Ella: No,

don't believe you do, I think you just need the one EBSCO account, for each

individual person, and then you can start categorizing and saving all your content

from a variety of institutions. Ruby: Excellent. And extending from the EBSCO account, Joe

asks is there a time limit to hold material in your profile. Ella: No, there's not,

unless you remove the content from the lists and the folders in your EBSCO

profile account, tthey won't ever go away, so they'll be there forever. Ruby: Great. I've

got just another question, um, someone would like you to list your five steps

again. Ella: Sure. Ruby: This is something we might send out

in the email tomorrow and it will be in the recording but if you could just

list those five steps. Ella: Sure. And I do apologise, I did actually think as I was listing them

in my conclusion just then, that I should have had a PowerPoint slide, because as

scholarly researchers, I'm sure you're all taking notes. Uh, it's not very useful

for you. But I will repeat them now. So step one, break down your topic and

identify your keywords. Step two, use these keywords to search eResources.

Step three, refine your results. Step four, organize your content. And step five,

navigate individual records. Ruby: Excellent. So we do have two more, questions we'll get

to, and if you do have any more we can stick around for a few minutes after to

answer them by text. And we also have as well on the slide there a link to our

Ask a Librarian service, where you can send us your inquiries and we can spend

up to an hour researching them. But the last two, oh, we've got a third one just

slipped in, so I might be, we might be able to get to that as well. We had a

question from Loretta about accessing JSTOR articles, and it sounds like in her

trying to access, them she's hit a paywall and she was wondering how this

would change with her Library card. Ella: Great, so if you are accessing databases

through the eResources portal, that will give you that access. So you need to log

in, if you're at home, like I showed you, through the eResources home page, and

then you'll be able to go to "Databases A to Z", lookup JSTOR and access it

that way, and there won't be any problems with that. Ruby: That's it. I think sometimes,

depending how you, if you say, search Google for an article or something, and

went through that, that's going, that's not going to give you our Library access.

You do very much need to go through that process Ella demonstrated in our eResources portal.

All right, so the next question's from Tara and in your referencing section she

says you, that her students use Harvard for referencing not Harvard Australia. Is

there a way to access this citation style through your site? Ella: No, I don't think

there is but there are plenty of freely available...

sort of free ones like KnightCite that will generate those references for you

once you put in the detail, so I'd recommend you do something [inaudible]...

Ruby: Two quick questions that have just snuck in... Ella: Sure. Ruby: ...that we'll cover. So

Loretta said thank you for answering her question before about JSTOR. Is it the

same for EEBO, which I believe is Early English Books Online. Ella: Yes. So you will

need to log in for early English books online as well through the eResources

portal, as I outlined. Ruby: Yeah. Great and then the last question comes from Robin and

she says, Am I able to research medical research journals" Ella: Okay, so the bulk of

the Library's eResources collection is social sciences focused. Nut what you can

do, is if you have a particular journal title that you want to double check

whether or not we have it in our collection online, go to that

"Publication's A to Z" function on the eResources homepage and you can search it

that way, because we do have some STEM content available online. Ruby: Excellent and I

think it is that process of trying different keywords and search terms and

seeing what we access, because we do provide access to such a large number of

databases and within them there are so many articles that it's definitely just

worth exploring. Great, well thank you so much Ella. Ella: Thank you. Thank you for

listening everyone. Ruby: And thank you everyone for those questions. And we'll

finish up today's session now, so as I showed, we've got an upcoming webinar you

can see on our screen on Ephemera. and if I go back as well, like today, we're

recording our session, if we have recorded quite a number of previous

webinars as well, which are available in our YouTube channel so if you have any

interest in some of the other topics that we've covered in previous webinars,

you can watch those. And we have more upcoming as well if you want to join our

live ones. And again if you have any further questions about our eResources or

any other Library questions, please use our Ask a Librarian service. But

thank you so much for attending today. you will get a feedback survey when you

exit out of today's webinar. We'd really appreciate if you could fill in that

survey and tell us what you think and that survey will also be emailed out

tomorrow with the recording and links and Ella's key points. All right, thank you

everyone and have a good rest of the day.

English

AllLiveWatched

Good afternoon everyone and thank you for joining us for today's webinar. My

name is Fiona Spooner and I'm the Acting Ephemera Officer here at the National

Library. I'm now going to turn off the camera, so we can focus on the presentation on

our screens... Okay, before we begin today's presentation, I'd like to acknowledge the

traditional owners of the land from which we are broadcasting this webinar,

the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples and to pay my respects to elders past present

and emerging. The National Library's Australian printed ephemera collection

is a fascinating and extensive collection that incorporates materials

relating to every facet of Australian life, from bookmarks to fruit box labels

to theatre programs and everything in between. The Library has been collecting

ephemera since 1901. In today's session, I will provide an overview of the

Library's Australian printed ephemera collections, focusing on our formed

collection of federal election campaigns ephemera.

We will also look at how to find and access items in our Ephemera collections

before answering any questions you may have at the end of the presentation.

Throughout the presentation I will highlight items in our collection

starting with this attractive example of a shop sign for Warner's rust-proof

corsets from 1918, the time when these rigid, body-shaping garments were still

playing a central role in Australian women's fashion. They began to fall out

of fashion in the night early 1920s, and by the 1960s and 70s the garment was

abandoned. Since I've been working in this role, one of the most common

questions I get asked is, "What is ephemera?" Ephemera is a term used to

describe all the minor, transient documents of everyday life, such as

pamphlets, tickets, programs, flyers and invitations. Ephemera are typically

produced for a short-term purpose such as advertising an event, and are not

intended to be kept. Ephemera material is printed, published, and usually fewer than

five pages. It spans a wide variety of formats and is often flimsy and

difficult to conserve. Ephemera can have strong relations to

other collections. For example, there are a lot of incidental items of ephemera

within Manuscripts collections, and ephemera also has strong overlaps

with our digital collecting. In the Library's collection you can find

everything from a 1796 playbill, to pizza delivery menus. Most people have no

idea that the Library collects this material and some may wonder why we are

interested in keeping items that are intended to be disposable and have short

term relevance. The Library collects ephemera as a documentary record of all

aspects of Australian life. When collected and preserved over time,

ephemera can be a useful source of historical research, providing rich

unique insights into events, people, places and social phenomena not recorded

by other more traditional Library sources. The fact that ephemera is not

designed to last is one of the reasons why it is so valuable.

Due to its direct and unmediated nature, it tends to tell the truth of the moment

and is therefore an informative primary source first for historians, students,

biographers, exhibitions, etc. Here we have an image of the Sydney Theatre playbill

of 1796, which is the oldest example of Australian printed ephemera in our

collections, and is the earliest known item to be printed in Australia. The

program, advertising three theatrical performances in Sydney, came out with the

First Fleet and was printed by the first Australian government printer George Hughes.

Ephemera is part of our national heritage, because it plays a unique role

in helping us understand our past. It evokes our past and enriches our present.

It can be a trigger for nostalgic memories or provide important insights

into past attitudes. Due to the vast quantity of ephemera material that is

produced in the community, it's not feasible to collect everything.

The Library collects a representative sample of contemporary and retrospective

ephemera, to provide a snapshot of all aspects of Australian life. Ephemera in

the collection documents cultural, sporting and political life, issues

and events of national significance, activities of Australian

people and organisations and our influence internationally. Where the

Library identifies topics of higher priority or national interest,

we aim to collect as comprehensively as possible. An example of this is seeking

to acquire campaign materials from the federal elections across all candidates,

electorates, parties and lobby groups.

Most of the ephemeral items in our collection are printed on paper, such as

brochures, flyers and posters, but we also have some objects in the collection such

as puzzles, badges and even an empty can of Hawke's Lager. Most ephemeral material

is produced in short print runs and disappears rapidly after

an event or campaign. We need to collect quickly and proactively as it can be

extremely difficult to acquire later. We acquire ephemera in a number of ways,

including through auction houses and dealers, by making direct requests for

material, such as orders of service or state memorials, for state memorials, sorry,

and crowdsourcing, whereby we enlist members of the public to help us collect.

This year we received hundreds of parcels of election of ephemera from

enthusiastic supporters right across Australia. We also get offered ephemera

donations. This well-preserved Stamina sports coat ink blotter was

donated to the Library by a gentleman who was working in a charity shop and

discovered the item being used as a bookmark. For the donor this item brought

back fond memories of his primary school years in Sydney during the 1950s. The

donor said he remembered wearing Stamina Australian wool trousers to school, and

he also recalled using Stamina blotters with their inkwell pens.

He remembered mixing up the Swan blue ink from a powder, by adding water and

taking it around the class to fill up inkwells. This demonstrates the

evocative power of ephemera. These items can help us to recall personal memories,

providing a tangible and direct link to the past.

The Australian printed ephemera collection is arranged into seven sub-

collections or sequences. These include general ephemera,

programs and invitations, Australian performing arts programs and ephemera,

trade catalogues, geography and travel ephemera,

scrapbooks and formed collections. Because the ephemera material is not

designed to last, it needs to be carefully preserved. Physical items in

the collection are stored in archival containers in a closed, secured stack in

the Library building, where temperature and humidity levels are monitored. The

collection takes up over 350 metres of shelf space and is constantly expanding

as we add more material. We'll now look at each of the sub collections that make up

our ephemera collection. Whilst the majority of the collection exists in

physical form only, a selection of items have been digitised and can be accessed

freely online. I've included samples from each sub-collection to help you

appreciate the diversity of this fascinating collection, and later in the

presentation I'll demonstrate how to find and access physical and online

content in our collections. The general ephemera sequence contains documents of

everyday life as well as issues of national importance.

Examples of categories include insurance, health, climate change and laws. From our

World War Two folder is this surrender ticket,

reportedly air dropped from a Japanese plane on Australian troops in Papua New

Guinea around 1944. This aerial propaganda leaflet

is divided into two, with an image of a wife or girlfriend waiting at home on the

left side, and on the right side her plaintive appeal is printed over a

reminder of death, with faint black and white skulls in the background. On the

back of the leaflet are instructions for surrendering. When I saw

this item for the first time it immediately had me wondering how many

soldiers might have fallen victim to this manipulative tactic, particularly

when morale was low.

A highlight of our general sequence of ephemera is the digitised menus

collection, which includes collections of menus from Airlines, department stores,

hotels, etc. These collections are useful for highlighting how much Australian

cuisine has changed throughout the years, including what we eat, how we describe,

prepare and present food and also how much we pay for it. From our collection

of department store menus is this double-sided menu for the London Stores

Cafe in Melbourne from 1936. On one side of the menu that you can see here, it

provides details and prices of light refreshments and the dinner menu. On the

reverse side shown here is a cartoon style map of Central Melbourne with the

main features of the time. This is an interesting example of a menu which

enables us to see not only what Australians dined on and paid for food

70 plus years ago, but also how the cityscape of Melbourne appeared at

this time. And here...I'm sorry...and here we have an example of a menu from a Chinese

restaurant in Elsternwick in Victoria. As well as being a tasty dining destination,

the Chinese restaurant is also an historical symbol of immigration and

cultural diversity in Australia. This menu is most probably from the 1970s, a

time when Chinese food had become popular cuisine in Australia and when

you could get a chicken chow min for just 80 cents.

However, we can see from this much earlier menu from 1911 that Chinese food

has long been an accessible cuisine in Australia. In fact, the presence of

commercially available Chinese food in Australia actually dates back to the

1850s, when the first major wave of Chinese migrants worked in cook houses

on the goldfields. Programs and invitations are curious souvenirs, which

reflect social events of national importance.

They can be related to specific events, general types of events, organisations

people or places. Within this collection is this interesting and elaborate

program in the shape of a pineapple.

The program was produced for a banquet function held at Finney's cafe in

Brisbane for a visit by the Prince of Wales in 1920. Events such as royal

visits to Australia have usually generated a large amount of ephemera

in the form of official programs, menus and invitations. The Library's Performing

Arts Programs and Ephemera, also known as our PROMPT collection, provides access to

a range of materials relating to the performing arts in Australia. It includes

programs, brochures, cast lists, publicity material, posters and flyers relating to

professional companies, artists and productions. Arrangement of the PROMPT

collection is predominantly by individual artists such as Nellie Melba,

or company, such as the Bangarra Dance Theatre, or the entrepreneur's names such

as J.C. Williamson. The Library has a great deal of material with the J.C. Williamson

provenance, including manuscripts, music and theatre programs. Known as The Firm,

J.C. Williamson limited was the dominant theatrical agency in Australia

for nearly a century, owning several theatres and bringing out to Australia a

succession of notable actors, singers and dancers. It was founded by the actor/

manager James C. Williamson in 1882, and has finally bought out in 1984. Our

collection of programs from the Tivoli Circuit is also worth highlighting. The

Tivoli Circuit is important in that it was a major music hall, review and

variety show house in Australia up until television caused its demise. The

programs in the Tivoli Collection are records of popular culture and social

life in Australia over seven decades, from the mid 1890s to the mid 1960s.

These programs can reveal taste and entertainment at a particular time and

how they've changed, who the stars were at any given time and who else was

involved through cast lists, changes in graphic design over time, and through

advertisements we can see what was fashionable and desirable, sometimes

prices, and also who was in what and where. Our collection of

trade ephemera documents organisations, companies, businesses and government

agency agencies and their products. This collection aims to reflect the

history and development of products and services in Australia over time. This

ephemera, used to advertise and sell products and services, usually involves

strong visual appeal, and a heightened use of language to attract attention and

impact on the consumer. Here's a visually attractive example from

1932. Murdoch's was a menswear store in Sydney and they issued this 80 page

clothing catalogue in time for the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge on the 19th

of March 1932. The copy in the collection also includes a blank order form and an

envelope. Also in the collection is the 1950s advertisement for a Whirlwind

Saver Lawnmower, which depicts a woman out mowing the lawn in her

bikini, whilst the man in the background is relaxing with his dog. And here we

have an image of an 1880s trade card from from an American boot and shoe

maker. The card advertising shoes and boots

made from kangaroo, porpoise, alligator and goat leather is part of the trade

cards collection in our trade sequence of ephemera. Trade cards, also known as

advertising cards, are small cards that in times past businesses would distribute

to clients and potential customers to advertise their business and wares. They

have been described as early examples of business cards and first became popular

at the beginning of the 17th century in London. Their use began to fade in the

1890s in favour of magazines and pamphlets, which were much more cost

effective. Our geography and travel collection of ephemera consists of

items that relate to the geography, history and tourist activities of places

in Australia, its Antarctic Territories and outlying islands. This includes

geographical features, national parks and reserves, regions, cities, towns and

buildings and other man-made structures. Here we have a 1925 tourism brochure

from Rottnest Island, which is being marketed as the Isle of

Girls. During its hundred years of tourism, Rottnest Island has been promoted

variously as the Isle of Youth, the Isle of Ease, and the Isle of Pleasure and the

Isle of Girls as depicted here. All of these work better than Rat's Nest, which

is the English translation of the Dutch name Rottnest. This name came about when

Dutch explorer, William de Vlamingh, mistook the Island's marsupials, known as

quokkas, for giant rats. We also have this amusing threefold tourism leaflet,

promoting the small New South Wales town of Holbrook, mocking the town's

obscurity. This leaflet asks the question, Where the hell is Holbrook?

Holbrook may not have been well-known when this modest leaflet was first

produced in the 1980s, but it speaks clearly to its aspirations with the town

being marked out on the map more prominently than the capital cities of

Canberra, Sydney and Melbourne. Whilst the Library no longer collects scrapbooks,

our collection of 19 PROMPT theatre scrapbooks, dating from 1857, are a

captivating part of the National Library's collection. A scrapbook

contains material put together by a collector around a subject or type of

material. Scrapbooks were a popular pastime during the late 19th century

through to the mid 20th century. Subject matter in our PROMPT collection of

scrapbooks includes theatre, opera ,ballet and other musical events. They include

records of performances by Dame Nellie Melba, Essendon Musical Society concerts

and photos of circus and vaudeville performers. Thanks to the generosity of

donors during the Library's 2018 appeal, digitisation work has transformed the

Library's rich collections of theatre scrapbooks. The majority of these

wonderful items are now available for new generations to enjoy online. Pictured

here are the images from Scrap...are images from Scrapbook Number 11. Nestled

within the brittle pages of this two volume scrapbook, are images of British

actress and singer Lily Brayton. On the brink of the First World War

Lily met and married Australian actor, producer and director,

Oscar Asche. Together they starred in a series of successful shows including

Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew and the musical comedy Chu Chin Chow, which

was written and directed by Oscar. A diligent fan lovingly collected images,

programs, tickets and news clippings really relating to this theatrical duo.

The Library's formed collections of ephemera are shaped around national

events, donors, a subject or a type of ephemera,

such as our delightful collection of ink blotters. The majority are around a

significant national event and their contents can be diverse.

There are currently 79 formed collections within the ephemera

collection. The images shown here are examples of digitised content from our

formed collections, including a commemorative Australian wool rug from

the 1956 Melbourne Olympics, which features a motif of Australian

wildflowers. A striking fruit box label, an ink blotter, which promotes the

insecticide Shell Tops, as just what you need for an enjoyable evening with its

pleasant odour that will remain for long periods. And a plastic bottle brush

flower, given out at the national apology to the Forgotten Australians and

former child migrants. A particular strength of our formed ephemera

collections is our holdings of federal election ephemera,

also known as Formed Collection 13. As well as our federal election posters and

broadsides, known as Broadside 403. A broadside is an early form of poster

that tended to be more textual than graphic. The National Library has been

collecting federal election campaign material comprehensively and impartially

since 1983. A huge formed collection of federal elections ephemera is thought

to be the largest of its type in Australia and includes items from every

federal election dating back to Federation in 1901. The purpose of

political....sorry....Candidates, parties and interest groups produced ephemera

during election campaigns to convey targeted messages in an

attempt to win votes. Strategies include appealing directly to the voters as

individuals, and in particular to their hip pockets. The use of humour and appeals

to our sense of patriotism are other strategies used. Having a collection such

as this ensures that a permanent documentary record of Australia's

political history is publicly available. These items are not only important in

terms of memory and preservation of the past, they also help us to analyse our

current political system and the way it operates. Campaign materials offer a

vibrant, evocative and informative insight into the dominating social and

political issues of each election and the stances that the parties took. These

items also provide wonderful insights into Australian politicians providing

evidence of their promises, policies and slogans, and the methods they use to try

and persuade us, including the use of language, symbols and images to get their

messages across. When collected over successive elections

these materials provide a meaningful record documenting the rise and fall of

policies, issues parties and careers. Even variations in the paper, colours, printing

techniques, finishes and size, will all be of interest to future scholars. As well

as having broader national significance, the material in its collection can also

have significance to individuals, who may have identified themselves with

candidates and their causes. They would can recall personal involvement, memories

and passions. An example is this poster. Picture in the top right hand corner of

the slide, that reads Vote for Guy Fawkes. This is a campaign poster from the 1969

federal election that was donated to the collection. This item has had special

significance for the donor who had recalled holding his poster when she

campaigned for the first time with her Mum and Dad as a young adult. For the

donor this poster symbolises the start of her interest in politics. The

collection is frequently used by a range of people for a wide range of purposes,

and typical users can include social historians, biographers,

students, academic researchers, authors, journalists, political parties and even

the politicians themselves. The National Library aims to collect printed election

campaign ephemera from every candidate, political party and lobby group in every

electorate in the country. Items such as flyers, how to vote cards, posters,

stickers, t-shirts, pencils and even a pair of red budgie smugglers, can be

found in this extensive and ever-expanding collection. We take in

material from previous federal election campaigns, where it can help us to fill

gaps in the collection. Online election material is collected separately and

delivered through the Australian Web Archive in Trove, which you can access

through the Library's Homepage. This year our Web Archiving team collect 1086

election-related websites. Here we have an example of political funny money.

Funny money was most...mostly issued by trade unions such as the Seaman's Union,

to support the Labour Party and/or to criticise the Liberal Country Party

policies. In this example from the 1972 campaign, the then-Treasurer of the

Liberal government, Billy Sneddon, is depicted as Billy the Billy Goat, and the

Prime Minister at the time, Billy McMahon, is described as the chief billy of them

all. From these images you can get a sense of the diverse range of federal

election campaign material we collect. We receive large quantities of paper

material, such as how to vote forms, and flyers, and t-shirts are also popular.

This one is from Kevin Rudd's 2013 campaign. Other interesting objects we

have collected include an empty pizza box ,a set of face masks of prominent

politicians, a cafe countertop election beanpole where customers can cast their

vote using coffee beans, and this year we have been...we've collected a pair of

earrings from the Stop Adani lobby group, and one of the fortune cookies that were

handed out to Melbourne commuters... commuters by the ACTU. Among the items

we don't take in are photocopies, digital scans or photographs of material.

We preserve only original material. We also don't collect ballot

papers or material from state or local government elections, which tend to be

collected by state and territory libraries. And we don't take in clippings

or adverts from journals or newspapers that we already collect, or overly large

objects in banners. We actively source campaign material from every candidate,

party and lobby group. We collect without bias, preserving material reflecting all

points of view, or electorates, and all active groups. It's vital that the

collection is as representative of the landscape of each election as possible.

We enlist voluntary public support via our website, social media and

traditional media channels, such as radio, newspapers and television. And this

crowdsourcing approach enables us to capture as much material as possible

from all over Australia, including rural and remote regions, as well as overseas

polling stations. This year we received hundreds of parcels of campaign material,

coming from every electorate in the country. We also request the help of

staff, volunteers and Friends of the Library and their personal and

professional networks. When gathered over successive years, this fascinating

material provides a unique and very meaningful documentary record that

enriches rather than replicates official versions. There is great value in

providing access to the entire multitude in one place, allowing comparison and

showing change and evolution over time.

This small snapshot of campaign ephemera from the last 118 years

document some of the major issues in Australian politics and stances the

parties took. We can get a sense of some of the issues that have raised our

passions over the years, including immigration and border control, defence

and war, gender equality, health, education taxation, the environment and climate

change, an issue which has gained prominence since the beginning of the

21st century.

This snapshot of party campaign material documents the major parties in

Australian politics, the Labour Party, Australia's oldest political party, the

Liberal Party of Australia, and the Nationals, who were formerly known as the

Country Party. They also reflect the rise of the minor parties in the post-war

period, such as the DLP, the Nuclear Disarmament Party, the Australian Greens

and Pauline Hansen's One Nation party. You can also get a sense of how some of

the parties have positioned themselves over the years. We can also gain insights

into Australian politicians, with evidence of their promises, policies and

slogans. Campaign material also reflects the rise of the cult of personality, seen

at work in politicians such as Bob Hawke and Kevin Rudd during the Kevin 07

campaign. The collection also reveals how campaign materials have

changed over the past 118 years. In the years following Federation,

electioneering was dominated by public meetings and speeches and printed media

such as posters, handbills and newspaper advertisements. These materials were

often very detailed, with very...with little use of colour or images. By the

1960s, following improvements in printing techniques, more pamphlets were being

produced, often with glossy color photographs as well as more innovative

promotional items, such as this giveaway record, which would play the candidate's

message. By the 1970s the popularity of meetings and rallies drove the demand

for printed items such as t-shirts, buttons, badges and stickers. Also around

this time market research-tested slogans became central to campaigns, such as the

most famous political slogan in Australia's history, It's Time. In the

1980s and 90s there was a shift towards TV advertising and interviews, and by

2000, mass-produced printed campaign materials dominated. This continues in

present day election campaigns, however there is now a greater influence on

communicating with voters via digital platforms. The National Library's

ephemera collection is unique, ever-expanding and

represents every political view in Australia. Quite unlike other collections

it is built through the combined efforts of people from across Australia, and

without their support we would not be able to make it happen.

Campaign material from the 2019 federal election will soon be available to

readers and researchers at the National Library. Please keep an eye on the

Finding Aid which will be updated when the material is available for access.

Material in the ephemera collection is filed by subject and collective catalogue

records are created, which describe multiple items of ephemera on a subject.

Single items of ephemera are only catalogued individually where an item is

significant or rare. A subject entry may relate to a broad subject category, such

as a place, a person, a company or an event. The easiest way to find ephemera

in the Catalogue is to add the term ephemera to keyword searches, and I'll

take you through a Catalogue search shortly. General ephemera and trade

ephemera are arranged according to a subject thesaurus, which is an

alphabetical list of subject terms which shows their relationship with other

terms. These thesauri can be helpful for finding preferred and related subject

terms when searching for ephemera, and both of these documents can be accessed

from the Finding Australian Ephemera page on the Library's website. Some

collections, particularly large or complex performing arts collections, such

as the J.C. Williamson collection, and also the federal election campaigns ephemera,

have comprehensive finding aids to assist with searching. These can help

readers to find specific material by listing the complete contents of a

specific ephemera category, as well as related resources. Links to Finding Aids

can be found in the Catalogue records of the collections they relate to, and

there's also a complete list of the Finding Aids on the Finding Australian

Ephemera page on the Library's website, which I'll also show you shortly. If you

are able to visit the National Library, you can access our physical collections

by requesting material through the Catalogue,

using your Library card. Requested material is delivered to the Special

Collections Reading Room for viewing. Although the majority of the material in

the collection is in physical form, selected items of ephemera have been

digitized and made available online. These can be accessed via links in the

Catalogue records. Physical collection items are not available for interlibrary

loan, however, material from the ephemera

collection can be copied, subject to copyright and permissions restrictions

and preservation risks. Low resolution copies of digitised collection items can

be freely downloaded through the Trove viewer, whilst high-resolution print and

digital copies can be ordered through our Copies Direct service by links in

the Catalog records and also in the Trove image viewer.

Okay, so I'll now take you through the process of searching for ephemera

material in our collections, using the Library's Catalogue, which we can link to

from the National Library's home page.

Before we get started, I'll just highlight a link here to the Get a Library Card,

which is about halfway down the homepage, so if you don't already have a

Library card, just click on this link, complete the online form and we can post a

card out to your residential address free of charge. And you'll need a Library

card if you'd like to visit the Library to access our physical ephemera

collections. Okay, so we're just going to go back up to near the top of the homepage.

We've got a link here where we can go straight in and do you a search of the

Catalogue. On this occasion I'm actually going to click into the Catalogue page. Okay,

and as I said I'll just demonstrate an example of a search of, um, for ephemera

material in our collections. So if for example we're looking for ephemera on

the topic of ice cream, we simply just type in the keywords "ice cream", and we

add the term ephemera to the search. Then we just

click on the "Find" button here and here's our results. It's only actually brought up

three results, but we can see that this first result in the list looks like it's

going to be relevant to our search. But I just also before I go in and have a

closer look at that record, I just wanted to point out the difference between the

first two records that have come up in the search results. The second record

down you may be able to see has square brackets around the title. Now this

indicates that it is a Collective subject record and most of the ephemera

in the collection is catalogued as a Collective record. In other words, this

record describes multiple items of ephemera on a particular subject, so in

the case, this case here, the second result down, it's a collection of

ephemera that relates to Australian shop counter display advertisements. Okay, so

we'll just go up to this first result now. There's no square brackets around the

title and this is an example of a ephemera item that has been catalogued

individually as a standalone item. So this usually happens for significant or

rare items in the collection, for example.

Okay, so this is the catalogue record for Podesta's Grand Pacific ice cream cones.

You can see first, I'll just point out first of all a little bit about the

Catalogue record and where we can find particular things. I'll just start by

pointing out where this particular, as I said, it's an item of ephemera, and if you

want to work out where it sits within the ephemera collections, the easiest way

to do that is just to come down to the tabs at the bottom of the screen. Click

on the "In the Library" tab, and you get the item record here which in this case

it shows that this item can be found in the Food Industry, Confectionary and

Ice-cream file, within our trade catalogues sequence of ephemera.

Okay, so we can find out a little bit more information about the item itself here

in the description and the summary fields. The description field shows mostly

physical details about the item and also the publication date, which in this case

has been estimated to be between 1900 and 1909. And we can see that it's a

carton packaging label for ice cream cones manufactured by Podesta and Sons.

And there's also a little bit about the history of the company here in the

record, under the "Biography History" field. So if you have a Library card and you're

able to visit the Library and you want to view the physical item in the

collection, you just need to come down to the "In the Library" tab again, and click

on the "Request this" button. If you've already logged into the Catalogue, it will

take you to another screen where you do need to click on "Submit "to complete the

request, and the material will be delivered to the Special Collections

Reading Room when it's available for viewing. If however you aren't able to

make it into the Library and you want to just view the digitised item, so as I

explained in this case it is a physical collection item, which has been digitised,

and we can tell that simply by the presence of the thumbnail image at the

top of the record. But there's also a hyperlink here in the "Online Versions"

field of the record, which is the fourth field down. And also if you go to the

bottom of the record to the "Online" tab, you can again see that there is a hyperlink

to the record. So you can click on any of these to gain access to the

digitised version of the item. Now this opens up the image of the item in our

Trove viewer, and you'll notice that at the bottom of the image here there's a

number of controls, which can help you to manipulate the images for easier viewing.

So we have for example buttons to zoom in and out, left and right arrows for

navigating through when there's multiple images, we can also go to show for that,

go to a full-screen view, um and yeah there's various things that you

can do there just to make viewing a bit easier. I'll also point out the sidebar menu

on the left hand side of the page, you can see there's a series of icons

running down the side of the page there. Just a few that I'll point out today,

second one down is a "C" with a circle around it, that's the copyright button. If

you click on that, you can find out what the copyright status of this particular item

is. In this case the item was published before 1955, so it is out of copyright.

Now just to bear in mind with the collective entries that I talked about

earlier, which described multiple pieces of ephemera on a particular subject, you

won't be able to find out the copyright status. It'll come up as "Copyright status

undetermined", and that's simply because the collection will contain as I said,

numerous pieces that will have a range of publication dates. But in this case

it's a single item, so we are able to find out what the copyright status is.

Okay we're just going to move down now to the the button, the icon, that's fourth

from the bottom, and that is the download icon. And here you can download a low

resolution copy of the image. You've got different files that can download to

here. JPEG files, a PDF, or a text file in this case here. And just below that

button is the "Order" icon, and you click on that if you would like to order

high-quality, uh sorry, high-resolution or publishing quality copies of an item.

And if you click on the "Order now" button, that will take you through to our Copies

Direct page and you would just need to complete an online form. Okay, so just

go back to the National Library homepage.

We'll now do another search, but this time

we will also refer to the General Ephemera Subject Thesaurus. Now when

you're searching for ephemera, a good place to start is the "Finding Australian

Ephemera page". You can get to this page by clicking on the "Collections" drop down

menu at the top of the Library's homepage.

And then ... get there eventually, sorry, and then selecting the "Ephemera"

heading, which takes us to the Ephemera collection homepage. Now we need to

scroll to the bottom of its page, to the "In this section" heading, and then click

on the "Finding Australian Ephemera" link, and on this page you will find useful

information and resources for finding and accessing ephemera in our

collect